Edward Morgan

M, #3301, b. 1670, d. 1732
Father*Sir James Morgan, 4th Baronet of Llantarnum b. 1640
Mother*Lady Alice Hopton b. 1640, d. 1734
     Edward Morgan was also known as Edward Morgan the tailor.1 Edward Morgan, son of Sir James Morgan, 4th Baronet of Llantarnum and Lady Alice Hopton, was born in 1670.
Edward married Elizabeth Jarman, daughter of John Jarman.
Edward Morgan lived in 1683 Radnor, Deleware County, Pennsylvania.1 Edward was a member of the Society of Friends in 1695 at Towamencin Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.1
Edward Morgan lived in 1695 Pennsylvania, They built a house and owned 500 acres of land.1 ; The homestead that Edward Morgan purchased in February, 1708
The homestead that Edward Morgan purchased in February, 1708

This 2 1/2 story log house, the only one of its kind still surviving in America, was built by grandparents of Daniel Boone, the frontiersman, and forebears of General Daniel Morgan famed Revolutionary War "raider." In this house the American roots of a distinguished family tree were planted. This cabin erected on an 800 acre site by well-to-do Welch Quaker Edward Morgan. Near Gwynedd, PA, site of historic William Penn Inn, The Morgan House adjoins Valley Forge road and Allentown Road. The latter was the escape route taken by those escorting the Liberty Bell to be hidden in Allentown's Zion Church. Edward Morgan's son, Morgan, had built a house on 197 acres of the original 800 acres in 1718.
Edward died in 1732.
Edward Morgan and Elizabeth, his wife, both free, arrived at Philadelphia in the same ship (The Morning Star) from Liverpool, in the 9th month 1683 (20th 9th month)." (Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol 8, page 329). (note: does this mean that they were married before the 1683 sailing or that it should be restated that Edward and Elizabeth his wife to be, arrived.......)
The ancestry of Edward Morgan, progenitor of the Morgan family of Montgomery County, Penn., and grandfather of explorer Daniel Boone & Edward Boone, is still a matter of speculation. One of the most objective analyses of the identity and family of Edward Morgan was made some fifty years ago by Mrs. Hazel Atterbury Spraker, in her book, THE BOONE FAMILY. Excerpts from this source are as follows:
"There is an early record which states that "Edward Morgan and Elizabeth his wife, both free, arrived at Philadelphia in the same ship (The Morning Star) from Liverpool, in the 9th month 1683 (20th 9th month)." (Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, Vol.8,page 329)
"Another Edward Morgan, recorded in Radnor Monthly Meeting, was born in Merionithshire, Wales, 25 August 1679; was a son of Cadwalader Morgan, and came to Pennsylvania with his parents."
"A third Edward Morgan is referred to by Thomas Allen Glenn in his Welsh Founders of Pennsylvania, Vol. 2, page 1, in which it is stated that Edward Morgan of near Bala, Co. Merionithshire, a tailor, had a son named Morgan
who removed to Gwynedd, PA, about 1700 and was a freeholder of 800 acres of land in Gwynedd, died in Towamencin, 1727, leaving a wife Dorothy.
A fourth record of an Edward Morgan is found in a "History of the Family of Morgan, from the year 1089 to Present Times," by James Appleton Morgan, New York (1897-1902). In this it is stated that Edward Morgan was the son of Sir James Morgan, 4th Baronet of Llantarnum, and wife, Lady Alice Hopoton; that Edward came to America with his sister Sarah, wife of Stephen Beasley, married Margaret --- and had a daughter Sarah Morgan who married Squire Boone. No authority is given for this last statement. In this book the ancestry is carried back through many royal lines to as early as the year 605.
At this late date it seems impossible to determine which, if any of the above Edward Morgans was the father of Sarah, and hence the grandfather of Daniel Boone. Although his ancestry, his early life and the name of his wife, may always remain in obscurity, we yet have a brief history of the later life and children of Edward of Gwynedd, as given in "Historical Collections of Gwynedd by Howard Jenkins, page 410." This history of Edward Morgan reads as follows:
"The first settler in Gwynedd or its vicinity named Morgan, was Edward. He seems to have been here as early as 1704, as the road upward through Gwynedd, made in that year, was to go as far as his place. He was a tailor by trade, a Welshman by birth, no doubt, and probably advanced in years when he came. He had lived previously near Philadelphia. In February, 1708, he bought 300 acres of land in what is now Towamencin, of Griffith Jones, merchant, Philadelphia. The tract lay along William John's land, and was therefore on the township line. In 1714 he bought 500 acres more, nearby, of George Claypool of Philadelphia, who, like Griffith Jones,was a speculative holder of Towamencin lands. By 1713 he had apparently moved to Montgomery; in the deed from Claypool he is described as a "yeoman of Montgomery."
Edward Morgan no doubt had several children. His sons probably received and held the Towamencin lands. In the list of 1734, for that township there appear: Joseph Morgan, 200 acres, Daniel Morgan, 200; John Morgan, 100. In 1727, Morgan Morgan of Towamencin died leaving a will in which he mentions his wife Dorothy, his brothers Joseph, John and William, his two sons Edward and Jesse (both minors), and his niece Elizabeth, John's daughter."
Karen_Williams@ibi.com wrote: Notes for Edward Morgan: It is known that Edward Morgan was in Philadelphia in 1684 when he was granted a lot in the city: (Seal) William Penn Proprietary & Governor of Pennsylvania & ye territories thereunto belonging At ye request of Edward Morgan yt I would grant him to take up a lott in ye City of Philadelphia These are to will & require thee forthwith to survey or cause to be surveyed unto him a lott in ye center on Skullkill side be fencing it in & building upon ye same wthin. six months from ye date of survey & make returns thereof into my Secretarys office. Given at Philadelphia ye 27th of ye 5th mo 1684
Wm Penn
For Thomas Holme
Surveyr. Genl.
In 1681 William Penn sold all of Pennsylvania to speculative holders (in Wales) in portions of 5000 acres. By 1682 all allotments were completed and the books were closed. One of the speculators, Griffith Jones, made his purchase in Wales and upon his arrival in Pennsylvania he found that much of his land had been settled. He only received 2290 acres of his original 5000 acres, of which 600 acres were in Towamencin. In 1702 Jones received a patent from the Commissioners of Property for the 600 acres in Towamencin and sold 300 acres of it to Edward Morgan by deed dated 26 February 1708. This tract adjoined the land of William John and was on the Township line (Valley Forge Road). James Claypoole, a merchant, got a grant of patent for 1000 acres in Towamencin from William Penn on 02 February 1686. At James Claypoole's death his son George. Claypoole inherited the 1000 acres, which was recorded on 25 April 1700. George Claypoole sold the tract to another speculator, Clements Plumstead, in 1702 and then bought it back on 26 June 1708. On 22 September 1714 Edward Morgan received a deed for 500 acres of Claypoole's 1000 acres in Towamencin. The 800 acres were distributed by Edward Morgan to his sons as follows: James Claypoole Tract Griffith Jones Tract
Morgan Morgan 197 acres Joseph Morgan 250 acres
Daniel Morgan 222 acres John Morgan 54 acres
John Morgan 50 acres Vacant land 27 acres
John Morgan's parcels of the two main tracts adjoined.
"The first settler in Gwynedd or its vicinity named Morgan, was Edward. He seems to have been here as early as 1704, as the road upward through Gwynedd, made in that year, was to go as far as his place. He was a tailor by
trade, a Welshman by birth, no doubt, and probably advanced in years when he came. He had lived previously near Philadelphia. In February, 1708, he bought 300 acres of land in what is now Towamencin, of Griffith Jones, merchant, Philadelphia. The tract lay along William John's land, and was therefore on the township line. In 1714 he bought 500 acres more, nearby, of George Claypool of Philadelphia, who, like Griffith Jones,was a speculative holder of Towamencin lands. By 1713 he had apparently moved to Montgomery; in the deed from
Claypool he is described as a "yeoman of Montgomery."
Edward Morgan no doubt had several children. His sons probably received and held the Towamencin lands. In the list of 1734, for that township there appear: Joseph Morgan, 200 acres, Daniel Morgan, 200; John Morgan, 100. In 1727, Morgan Morgan of Towamencind died leaving a will in which he mentions his wife Dorothy, his brothers Joseph, John and William, his two sons Edward and Jesse (both minors), and his niece Elizabeth, John's daughter."
Children of Edward Morgan and Elizabeth Jarman are:
i. Alice Morgan, married Jenkins Evans August 17, 1718 in Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, Gwynedd, Montgomery County, PA; born 1695. More About Jenkins Evans and Alice Morgan: Marriage: August 17, 1718, Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, Gwynedd, Montgomery County, PA
ii. Joseph Morgan
iii. Morgan Morgan, born in Bucks, PA; died Abt. 1727 in Whitpain Twp, Philadelphia, PA; married Dorothy Hughes 1718 in Gwynedd, Montgomery County, PA.
iv. William Morgan, married (1) Elizabeth Roberts August 27, 1713 in Radnor Monthly Meeting; married (2) Catherine Robeson October 07, 1731. Marriage Notes for William Morgan and Elizabeth Roberts: 8-27, 1713. Marriage of William Morgan, son of Edward Morgan of or near Gwynedd, Co. of Phila., and Elizabeth Roberts. Witnessed by Alice Morgan, Edd. Morgan, Edd. Morgan, Jr., Daniel Morgan and others. William Morgan, widower, married Catherine Robeson on the 07th of the 10th month, 1731.
More About William Morgan and Elizabeth Roberts: Marriage: August 27, 1713, Radnor Monthly Meeting
v. Edward Morgan, died Abt. 1718 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA; arried Margaret.
vi. Elizabeth Morgan, born Abt. 1683 in Towamincin, Montgomery County, PA; married Cadwallader Morris March 24, 1709/10 in Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, Montgomery County, PA; born Abt. 1690 in Gwynedd, Philadelphia County, PA. Marriage Notes for Elizabeth Morgan and Cadwallader Morris: WHEREAS Cadwalader Morris of Gwynedd in the County of Philadelphia and Elisabeth Morgan of the same Place having declared their Intentions of Marriage with each other before severall Monthly Meetings of the people Quakers according to the good Order Used among them whose Proceedings therein after a deliberate Consideration thereof and having consent of Parents and Relations concerned were Permited by the sayd Meetings NOW these are to Certifie all whom it may concern that for the full accomplishing of their sayd Intentions this 24th day of the 3 month 1710 the sayd Cadr Morris & Eliza: Morgan appeared in a publick Meeting of the sayd People at their Publick Meeting Place at Gwynedd afforesayd and the sayd Cadr Morris taking the sayd Eliza: Morgan by the hand in Solemn Manner Openly declare that he took her to be his wife Promising with Gods assistance to be unto her a Faithfull and loving Husband Untill Death should separate them and then and there in the sayd assembly the sayd Eliza Morgan did in like Manner declare that she took the sayd Caddr Morris to be her Husband Promising with Gods assistance to be unto him a faithfull and Loving Wife Untill death should separate them and Moreover the sayd Caddr & Eliza: she according to the Custome of Marriage assuming the Name of her Husband as a further Confirmation thereof did then and there to these Presents sett their hands and we whose names are underwritten being among others Present at ye Solemnization of the sd Marriage and subscription in manner aforesayd as witnesses thereunto have also to these Prsents sett our hands the day and year above written. Cadwalader Morris Cathrine Edward Ellis Pugh Elizabeth Morris Eliza: Morgan Jno Pugh Margt Morgan Robt Jones Alex: Edwards Mary William John Humphrey Edd Morgan Bridget Griffith Hugh Evans Hugh Griffith Catherine Griffith Evan Griffith John Williams Mary Pugh Edd Foulke Wm Morgan Anne Evan Jno William John Morgan Jane Evan Jno Robert Morgan Morgan Ellin Hugh Jno Bevan Wm Jones Gainor Humphrey Evan Jones Dad Pugh Gainor Jones Evan Griffith
More About Cadwallader Morris and Elizabeth Morgan: Marriage: March 24, 1709/10, Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, Montgomery County, PA
vii. John Morgan, married Sarah Lloyd September 08, 1721 in Merion Monthly Meeting, Montgomery County, PA; born July 14, 1701.
Marriage Notes for John Morgan and Sarah Lloyd: 1721 Minutes of Gwynedd Monthly Meeting 3rdly Application being made on behalf of John Morgan for a Certificate to Haverford Monthly Meeting in order to proceed in Marriage with one Sarah Lloyd belonging to the said Meeting. John Jones and Cadwalader Foulke to make Necessary Enquiry and to write one agst next Meeting. 1st The friends Appointed last Meeting laid Down one Certificate for John Morgan 9-8, 1721. Marriage of John Morgan, son of Edward of Gwynedd, and Sarah Lloyd, daughter of Thomas of Merion. Witnessed by Dorothy Morgan, Edw. Morgan, William Morgan, Daniel Morgan, Sarah Boone, Squire Boone and others.
More About John Morgan and Sarah Lloyd: Marriage: September 08, 1721, Merion Monthly Meeting, Montgomery County, PA
viii. Daniel Morgan, married Elizabeth Roberts September 02, 1718 in Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, Gwynedd, Montgomery County, PA. Notes for Daniel Morgan: According Faragher's book, "Daniel Boone" --- The son of Daniel Boone - "Daniel" namesake and his mother's (Sarah Morgan) older brother. He was a traveling Quaker minister, "noted as a man of great bodily strength fearlessly encountering the perils of the wilderness," as descendants proudly put it.
Marriage Notes for Daniel Morgan and Elizabeth Roberts: 9-2, 1718. Daniel Morgan, son of Edward, adjacent Gwynedd, yeoman, and Elizabeth Roberts, dau. of Robert dec'd of Gwynedd, at Gwynedd Meeting House. Witnessed by Edward Morgan, William Morgan, John Morgan, Morgan Morgan, Joseph Morgan and others. More About Daniel Morgan and Elizabeth Roberts: Marriage: September 02, 1718, Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, Gwynedd, Montgomery County, PA
ix. Margaret Morgan, married Samuel Thomas March 01, 1712/13 in Chester County, PA. Marriage Notes for Margaret Morgan and Samuel Thomas: 3-1, 1713. Marriage of Samuel Thomas of Montgomery, Co. of Phila., and Margaret Morgan, dau. of Edward Morgan of the twp. and co. aforesaid; witnessed by Edward Morgan, Elizabeth Morgan, William Morgan, John Morgan, Daniel Morgan, Edward Morgan, Jr. and others. More About Samuel Thomas and Margaret Morgan: Marriage: March 01, 1712/13, Chester County, PA
x. Sarah Morgan, born Abt. 1700; died Abt. 1777 in Rowan County, NC; married Squire Boone July 23, 1720 in Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, Gwynedd, Montgomery County, PA; born November 26, 1696 in Devonshire, England; died January 02, 1765 in Rowan County, NC. More About Sarah Morgan: Burial: Joppa Cemetery, Mocksville, NC Marriage Notes for Sarah Morgan and Squire Boone: Squire Boone and Sarah Morgan apparently met at Gwynedd Meeting where, following Quaker custom, they announced to the group that they intended to get married: 5-26, 1720. Squire Boone and Sarah Morgan declare intentions: Caddr Evans and Robert Jones Catherine William and Ganior Jones to inquire. 6-30, 1720. Squire Boone and Sarah Morgan, 2nd time Caddr Evans and Robert Jones to see the marriage orderly accomplished. 7-27, 1720. Marriage of Squire Boone reported decently accomplished. Squire and Sarah were married on the 23rd day of the 07th month 1720: Whereas Squire Boone Son of George Boone of ye County of Philad & Province of Pensilvania Yeoman and Sarah Morgan Daughter of Edw Morgan of the Said County and Province Haveing Declared Their Intention of Marriage of Each Other before two Monthly Meetings of ye People Called Quakers Held at Gwynedd in ye Said County According to ye Good Order Used Among Them Whose Proceedings Therein After a Diliberate Consideration Therein and haveing Consent of Parents and Relation Concerned Their Said Proceedings Are Allowed of By Ye Said Meeting Now These Are to Certify All Whom it may Concern that for ye Full Accomplishing of Their Said Intentions This Twenty Third Day of ye Seventh Month In ye Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Twenty They ye Sd. Squire Boone and Sarah Morgan Appeared At A Solemn Assembly of ye Said People for ye Purpose Appointed at Their Publick meeting Place In Gwynedd Afforesd And ye Said Squire Boone Took ye Said SarahMorgan by ye Hand Did In A Solemn Manner Openly Declare he Took her To Be his Wife Promising To be Unto Her A Faithfull and Loveing Husband Untill Death Should Seperate Them And Then & There In the Said Assembly the said Sarah Morgan Did Likewise Declare She Took ye Said Squire Boone To be her Husband In Like Manner Promiseing to be Unto him a Faithfull and Loveing Wife Untill Should Seperate Them And Moreover The Said Squire Boone & Sarah She According to ye Custom of Marriage Assuming ye Name of Her Husband as Farther Confirmation Thereof Did Then and There to these presents Set There Hands And We Whose Names Are Under Written Being Among Others Present at ye Solemnization of the Said Marriage And Subscription in Manner Afforesd As Witnesses Thereunto have also to These Presents Set Our Hands ye Day & Year Above Writte n Samll Thomas Mary Webb Squire Boone Jenk Evans Eliz Morris Sarah Boone Robt Jones Dorothy Morgan Geo BooneMorgan Hugh Eliz Hughs Edw Morgan Jno Edwards Mary Hamer Eliz Morgan Tho Evan Eliz Morgan Geo Boone Cadr Evan Jane Griffith Ja Morgan Robt Evan Eliz Griffth Wm Morgan Jno Cadwalader Margt Jones Jno Morgan Jno William Ellen Evans Danll Morgan. More About Squire Boone and Sarah Morgan: Marriage: July 23, 1720, Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, Gwynedd, Montgomery County, PA.

Family

Elizabeth Jarman
Children

Citations

  1. [S424] Tom Morgan, "Family of Sarah Morgan, Daniel's Mother," Boone Family Discussion Group, Online posting dated July 12, 1998.

Elizabeth Jarman1

F, #3302
Father*John Jarman1

Family

Edward Morgan b. 1670, d. 1732
Children

Citations

  1. [S424] Tom Morgan, "Family of Sarah Morgan, Daniel's Mother," Boone Family Discussion Group, Online posting dated July 12, 1998.

Sir James Morgan, 4th Baronet of Llantarnum

M, #3303, b. 1640
Father*Sir Edward Morgan1 b. 1594
     Sir James Morgan, 4th Baronet of Llantarnum, son of Sir Edward Morgan, was born in 1640.
James married Lady Alice Hopton.

Family

Lady Alice Hopton b. 1640, d. 1734
Child

Citations

  1. [S1910] Internet Site: Boone Family Web Site).

Lady Alice Hopton

F, #3304, b. 1640, d. 1734
     Lady Alice Hopton was born in 1640 in Canon-Frome, Herefordshire, England.1
Alice married Sir James Morgan, 4th Baronet of Llantarnum, son of Sir Edward Morgan.
Alice died in 1734.

Family

Sir James Morgan, 4th Baronet of Llantarnum b. 1640
Child

Citations

  1. [S424] Tom Morgan, "Family of Sarah Morgan, Daniel's Mother," Boone Family Discussion Group, Online posting dated July 12, 1998.

Sir Edward Morgan, Second Baronet of Llantarnum1

M, #3305, b. 1562, d. 1653
Father*William Morgan, First Baronet of Llantarnum2 b. before 1553, d. March 29, 1592
Mother*Lady Francis Somerset2 b. 1562, d. 1653
     Edward married Francis (?)3 Sir Edward Morgan, Second Baronet of Llantarnum, son of William Morgan, First Baronet of Llantarnum and Lady Francis Somerset, was born in 1562.1,3 Conflicting evidence placed his birth in 1600.
Edward married Mary Englefield, daughter of Sir Francis Englefield Baronet.2
Edward died in 1653.1
He lived in Pencoed Castle.

Family 1

Francis (?)

Family 2

Mary Englefield
Child

Citations

  1. [S424] Tom Morgan, "Family of Sarah Morgan, Daniel's Mother," Boone Family Discussion Group, Online posting dated July 12, 1998.
  2. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  3. [S1910] Internet Site: Boone Family Web Site).

Mary Englefield

F, #3306
Father*Sir Francis Englefield Baronet1

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S1910] Internet Site: Boone Family Web Site).

Sir Francis Englefield Baronet1

M, #3307

Family

Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

William Morgan, First Baronet of Llantarnum1,2

M, #3308, b. before 1553, d. March 29, 1592
Father*John Morgan of Caerleon2 b. 1519
Mother*Elizabeth (?)2
     William Morgan, First Baronet of Llantarnum, son of John Morgan of Caerleon and Elizabeth (?), was born before 1553.1,3
William purchased He purchased the grange of Ceven vyneche and Llantarnam Abbey. at Ceven Vyneche, England, in 1553.2,3
William was he was sheriff of the county. in 1568.
William was member of Parliament for the county. in 1571.2
William married Lady Francis Somerset, daughter of Edward Somerset Earl of Worcester and Lady Elizabeth Hastings.1
William died on March 29, 1592.3 Conflicting evidence placed his death in 1628 (World Family Tree CD7.)1

Family

Lady Francis Somerset b. 1562, d. 1653
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S424] Tom Morgan, "Family of Sarah Morgan, Daniel's Mother," Boone Family Discussion Group, Online posting dated July 12, 1998.
  3. [S1910] Internet Site: Boone Family Web Site).

Lady Francis Somerset1

F, #3309, b. 1562, d. 1653
Father*Edward Somerset Earl of Worcester1 b. 1550, d. 1626/27
Mother*Lady Elizabeth Hastings1 d. 1621
     Lady Francis Somerset, daughter of Edward Somerset Earl of Worcester and Lady Elizabeth Hastings, was born in 1562 in Llantarnam, Monmouthshire, England.1,2
Francis married William Morgan, First Baronet of Llantarnum, son of John Morgan of Caerleon and Elizabeth (?).1
Francis died in 1653.1,2

Family

William Morgan, First Baronet of Llantarnum b. before 1553, d. March 29, 1592
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S424] Tom Morgan, "Family of Sarah Morgan, Daniel's Mother," Boone Family Discussion Group, Online posting dated July 12, 1998.

Edward Somerset Earl of Worcester1

M, #3310, b. 1550, d. 1626/27
     Edward Somerset Earl of Worcester was born in 1550.1
Edward married Lady Elizabeth Hastings, daughter of Francis Hastings and Lady Catherine Pole.1
Edward died in 1626/27.1

Family

Lady Elizabeth Hastings d. 1621
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Lady Elizabeth Hastings1

F, #3311, d. 1621
Father*Francis Hastings1 b. 1514, d. 1560
Mother*Lady Catherine Pole1 d. 1576
     Elizabeth married Edward Somerset Earl of Worcester.1
Elizabeth died in 1621.1

Family

Edward Somerset Earl of Worcester b. 1550, d. 1626/27
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Francis Hastings1

M, #3312, b. 1514, d. 1560
Father*George Hastings Earl of Huntington1 b. 1488, d. 1560
Mother*Anne Stafford1
     Francis Hastings, son of George Hastings Earl of Huntington and Anne Stafford, was born in 1514.1
Francis married Lady Catherine Pole.1
Francis died in 1560.1

Family

Lady Catherine Pole d. 1576
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Lady Catherine Pole1

F, #3313, d. 1576
     Catherine married Francis Hastings, son of George Hastings Earl of Huntington and Anne Stafford.1
Catherine died in 1576.1

Family

Francis Hastings b. 1514, d. 1560
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

George Hastings Earl of Huntington1

M, #3314, b. 1488, d. 1560
     George Hastings Earl of Huntington was born in 1488.1
George married Anne Stafford, daughter of Henry Stafford and Catherine Wydeville.1
George died in 1560.1

Family

Anne Stafford
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Anne Stafford1

F, #3315
Father*Henry Stafford1
Mother*Catherine Wydeville1
     Anne married George Hastings Earl of Huntington.1

Family

George Hastings Earl of Huntington b. 1488, d. 1560
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Henry Stafford1

M, #3316
Father*Earl Humphrey de Stafford1 d. 1455
Mother*Margaret Beaufort Somerset1
     Henry married Catherine Wydeville.1

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Catherine Wydeville1

F, #3317

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Earl Humphrey de Stafford1

M, #3318, d. 1455
Father*Earl Humphrey de Stafford1 d. 1403
Mother*Lady Anne Neville1 b. 1424, d. 1480
     Humphrey married Margaret Beaufort Somerset.1
Humphrey died in 1455.1

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Margaret Beaufort Somerset1

F, #3319

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Lady Anne Neville1

F, #3320, b. 1424, d. 1480
Father*Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland
Mother*Joan de Beaufort
     Anne married Earl Humphrey de Stafford, son of Earl Edward de Stafford and Countess Anne Plantagenet.1 Lady Anne Neville, daughter of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland and Joan de Beaufort, was born in 1424.1
Anne died in 1480.1

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Earl Humphrey de Stafford1

M, #3321, d. 1403
Father*Earl Edward de Stafford1 d. 1403
Mother*Countess Anne Plantagenet1 b. 1380, d. 1438
     Humphrey married Lady Anne Neville, daughter of Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland and Joan de Beaufort.1
Humphrey died in 1403.1

Family

Lady Anne Neville b. 1424, d. 1480
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Earl Edward de Stafford1

M, #3322, d. 1403
     Edward married Countess Anne Plantagenet, daughter of Prince Thomas Plantagenet and Lady Eleanor Bohun.1
Edward died in 1403.1

Family

Countess Anne Plantagenet b. 1380, d. 1438
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Countess Anne Plantagenet1

F, #3323, b. 1380, d. 1438
Father*Prince Thomas Plantagenet1 b. between 1353 and 1354
Mother*Lady Eleanor Bohun1 d. 1385
     Anne married Earl Edward de Stafford.1 Countess Anne Plantagenet, daughter of Prince Thomas Plantagenet and Lady Eleanor Bohun, was born in 1380.1
Anne died in 1438.1

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Lady Eleanor Bohun1,2

F, #3324, d. 1385
Father*William Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton1 b. circa 1312, d. September 13, 1360
Mother*Elizabeth de Badlesmere1 d. 1419
     Eleanor married Prince Thomas Plantagenet, son of Edward III (?), King of England and ,.1
Eleanor died in 1385.1,3

Family

Prince Thomas Plantagenet b. between 1353 and 1354
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3335] 1870 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Samuel S. Williams household.
  3. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Prince Thomas Plantagenet1

M, #3325, b. between 1353 and 1354
Father*Edward III (?), King of England b. November 13, 1312, d. June 22, 1377
Mother*, b. 1314, d. 1369
     Prince Thomas Plantagenet, son of Edward III (?), King of England and ,, was born between 1353 and 1354.1
Thomas married Lady Eleanor Bohun, daughter of William Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton and Elizabeth de Badlesmere.1

Family

Lady Eleanor Bohun d. 1385
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Humphrey Bohun, 4th Earl of Herford, 3rd Earl of Essex1,2

M, #3326, b. 1276
Father*Earl Humphrey Bohun, 3rd Earl of Herford, 2nd Earl of Essex1 b. 1248, d. December 31, 1297
Mother*Maude de Fiennes1
     He held the title of Earl of Essex.2
He held the title of Earl of Herford.2 Humphrey Bohun, 4th Earl of Herford, 3rd Earl of Essex, son of Earl Humphrey Bohun, 3rd Earl of Herford, 2nd Earl of Essex and Maude de Fiennes, was born in 1276.1
Humphrey married Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet, daughter of HRH King Edward Plantagenet I of England and Countess Eleanor (?) de Ponthieu, on November 14, 1302 at Westminster, England.1,2
Humphrey died on March 16, 1322 in Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire, England, killed in battle.2 He was buried in March, 1322 in York, North Yorkshire, England.2 Conflicting evidence placed his death May 5, 1316 (Boone World Family Tree CD 7.)1

Family

Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet b. August, 1282, d. May 5, 1316
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet1

F, #3327, b. August, 1282, d. May 5, 1316
Father*HRH King Edward Plantagenet I of England1 b. June 17, 1239, d. July 8, 1307
Mother*Countess Eleanor (?) de Ponthieu b. 1244, d. November 28, 1290
     Her family name was Plantagenet.2 Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet, daughter of HRH King Edward Plantagenet I of England and Countess Eleanor (?) de Ponthieu, was born in August, 1282 in Rhuddlan Castle, Caemarvon, Gynedd, Wales, England.1,2

Elizabeth married , Count of Holland and Zeeland on January 18, 1297 at Ipswich, Suffolk, England.2
Elizabeth married Humphrey Bohun, 4th Earl of Herford, 3rd Earl of Essex, son of Earl Humphrey Bohun, 3rd Earl of Herford, 2nd Earl of Essex and Maude de Fiennes, on November 14, 1302 at Westminster, England.1,2
Elizabeth died on May 5, 1316 in England at age 33.1,2 She was buried in May, 1316 in Walden Abbey in Essex, England.2

Family 1

, Count of Holland and Zeeland d. November 10, 1299

Family 2

Humphrey Bohun, 4th Earl of Herford, 3rd Earl of Essex b. 1276
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

William Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton1,2

M, #3328, b. circa 1312, d. September 13, 1360
Father*Humphrey Bohun, 4th Earl of Herford, 3rd Earl of Essex1 b. 1276
Mother*Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet1 b. August, 1282, d. May 5, 1316
     William Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton, son of Humphrey Bohun, 4th Earl of Herford, 3rd Earl of Essex and Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet, was born circa 1312.1,2
He held the title of Earl of Northampton, awarded 1337.2
William married Elizabeth de Badlesmere, daughter of Bartholemew de Badlesmere, Lord Badlesmere and Margaret de Clare.1,2
William died on September 13, 1360.1,2

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Elizabeth de Badlesmere1,2

F, #3329, d. 1419
Father*Bartholemew de Badlesmere, Lord Badlesmere
Mother*Margaret de Clare

Family

William Bohun, 1st Earl of Northampton b. circa 1312, d. September 13, 1360
Children

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

HRH King Edward Plantagenet I of England1,2,3

M, #3330, b. June 17, 1239, d. July 8, 1307
Father*HRH King Henry Plantagenet III of England1 b. October 10, 1206, d. November 16, 1272
Mother*Eleanor Berenger, Eleanor of Provence b. 1222
King Edward I of England
     His sobriquet was "Longshanks" or "Hammer of the Scots" during the period he was King of England. He was styled as "Rex Angliae, Dominus Hiberniae, et Dux Aqutaniae".2
He held the title of Earl of Chester.2 HRH King Edward Plantagenet I of England, son of HRH King Henry Plantagenet III of England and Eleanor Berenger, Eleanor of Provence, was born on June 17, 1239 in Westminster, London, Middlesex, England.1,2
Edward married Countess Eleanor (?) de Ponthieu, daughter of HRH King Ferdinand Hapsburg III of Castile and Leon and Johanna of Ponthieu (?), Countess Aumale, in October, 1254 at Burgos, Castile and Leon, Spain.2
He held the title of King of England during the period 1272 to 1307.2 His coronation as King of England was held on August 19, 1274 at Westminster Abbey, London, Middlesex, England. He was crowned by Robert Kilwardby, Archbishop of Canterbury.2
Edward married ,, daughter of Philip III (?), King of France, on September 8, 1299 at Canterbury Cathedral, Kent, England.2
Edward died on July 8, 1307 in Burgh-by-Sands, Cumbria, England, at age 68.1,2 He was buried in July, 1307 in Westminster Abbey in London, Middlesex, England.2

Edward I by William Henry Worthington (born c.1790)(c) Royal Collection
Born in June 1239 at Westminster, Edward was named by his father Henry III after the last Anglo Saxon king (and his father's favourite saint) Edward the Confessor. Edward's parents were renowned for their patronage of the arts (his mother, Eleanor of Provence, encouraged Henry III to spend money on the arts, which included the rebuilding of Westminster Abbey and a still-extant magnificent shrine to house the body of Edward the Confessor), and Edward received a disciplined education - reading and writing in Latin and French, with training in the arts, sciences and music. In 1254, Edward travelled to Spain for an arranged marriage at the age of 15 to 9-year-old Eleanor of Castile. Just before Edward's marriage, Henry III gave him the duchy of Gascony, one of the few remnants of the once vast French possessions of the English Angevin kings. Gascony was part of a package which included parts of Ireland, the Channel Islands and the King's lands in Wales to provide an income for Edward. Edward then spent a year in Gascony, studying its administration. Edward spent his young adulthood learning harsh lessons from Henry III's failures as a king, culminating in a civil war in which he fought to defend his father. Henry's ill-judged and expensive intervention in Sicilian affairs (lured by the Pope's offer of the Sicilian crown to Henry's younger son) failed, and aroused the anger of powerful barons including Henry's brother-in-law Simon de Montfort. Bankrupt and threatened with excommunication, Henry was forced to agree to the Provisions of Oxford in 1258, under which his debts were paid in exchange for substantial reforms; a Great Council of 24, partly nominated by the barons, assumed the functions of the King's Council. Henry repudiated the Provisions in 1261 and sought the help of the French king Louis IX (later known as St Louis for his piety and other qualities). This was the only time Edward was tempted to side with his charismatic and politically ruthless godfather Simon de Montfort - he supported holding a Parliament in his father's absence. However, by the time Louis IX decided to side with Henry in the dispute and civil war broke out in England in 1263, Edward had returned to his father's side and became de Montfort's greatest enemy. After winning the battle of Lewes in 1264 (after which Edward became a hostage to ensure his father abided by the terms of the peace), de Montfort summoned the Great Parliament in 1265 - this was the first time cities and burghs sent representatives to the parliament. (Historians differ as to whether de Montfort was an enlightened liberal reformer or an unscrupulous opportunist using any means to advance himself.) In May 1265, Edward escaped from tight supervision whilst hunting. On 4 August, Edward and his allies outmanoeuvred de Montfort in a savage battle at Evesham; de Montfort predicted his own defeat and death 'let us commend our souls to God, because our bodies are theirs ... they are approaching wisely, they learned this from me.' With the ending of the civil war, Edward worked hard at social and political reconciliation between his father and the rebels, and by 1267 the realm had been pacified. In April 1270 Parliament agreed an unprecedented levy of one-twentieth of every citizen's goods and possessions to finance Edward's Crusade to the Holy Lands. Edward left England in August 1270 to join the highly respected French king Louis IX on Crusade. At a time when popes were using the crusading ideal to further their own political ends in Italy and elsewhere, Edward and King Louis were the last crusaders in the medieval tradition of aiming to recover the Holy Lands. Louis died of the plague in Tunis before Edward's arrival, and the French forces were bought off from pursuing their campaign. Edward decided to continue regardless: 'by the blood of God, though all my fellow soldiers and countrymen desert me, I will enter Acre ... and I will keep my word and my oath to the death'. Edward arrived in Acre in May 1271 with 1,000 knights; his Crusade was to prove an anticlimax. Edward's small force limited him to the relief of Acre and a handful of raids, and divisions amongst the international force of Christian Crusaders led to Edward's compromise truce with the Baibars. In June 1272, Edward survived a murder attempt by an Assassin (an order of Shi'ite Muslims) and left for Sicily later in the year. He was never to return on Crusade. Meanwhile, Henry III died on 16 November 1272. Edward succeeded to the throne without opposition - given his track record in military ability and his proven determination to give peace to the country, enhanced by his magnified exploits on Crusade. In Edward's absence, a proclamation in his name delcared that he had succeeded by hereditary right, and the barons swore allegeiance to him. Edward finally arrived in London in August 1274 and was crowned at Westminster Abbey. Aged 35, he was a veteran warrior ('the best lance in all the world', according to contemporaries), a leader with energy and vision, and with a formidable temper. Edward was determined to enforce English kings' claims to primacy in the British Isles. The first part of his reign was dominated by Wales. At that time, Wales consisted of a number of disunited small Welsh princedoms; the South Welsh princes were in uneasy alliance with the Marcher lords (feudal earldoms and baronies set up by the Norman kings to protect the English border against Welsh raids) against the Northern Welsh based in the rocky wilds of Gwynedd, under the strong leadership of Llywelyn ap Gruffyd, Prince of Gwynedd. In 1247, under the Treaty of Woodstock, Llywelyn had agreed that he held North Wales in fee to the English king. By 1272, Llywelyn had taken advantage of the English civil wars to consolidate his position, and the Peace of Montgomery (1267) had confirmed his title as Prince of Wales and recognised his conquests.
However, Llywelyn maintained that the rights of his principality were 'entirely separate from the rights' of England; he did not attend Edward's coronation and refused to do homage. Finally, in 1277 Edward decided to fight Llywelyn 'as a rebel and disturber of the peace', and quickly defeated him. War broke out again in 1282 when Llywelyn joined his brother David in rebellion. Edward's determination, military experience and skilful use of ships brought from England for deployment along the North Welsh coast, drove Llywelyn back into the mountains of North Wales. The death of Llywelyn in a chance battle in 1282 and the subsequent execution of his brother David effectively ended attempts at Welsh independence. Under the Statute of Wales of 1284, Wales was brought into the English legal framework and the shire system was extended. In the same year, a son was born in Wales to Edward and Queen Eleanor (also named Edward, this future king was proclaimed the first English Prince of Wales in 1301). The Welsh campaign had produced one of the largest armies ever assembled by an English king - some 15,000 infantry (including 9,000 Welsh and a Gascon contingent); the army was a formidable combination of heavy Anglo-Norman cavalry and Welsh archers, whose longbow skills laid the foundations of later military victories in France such as that at Agincourt. As symbols of his military strength and political authority, Edward spent some £80,000 on a network of castles and lesser strongholds in North Wales, employing a work-force of up to 3,500 men drawn from all over England. (Some castles, such as Conway and Caernarvon, remain in their ruined layouts today, as examples of fortresses integrated with fortified towns.) Edward's campaign in Wales was based on his determination to ensure peace and extend royal authority, and it had broad support in England. Edward saw the need to widen support among lesser landowners and the merchants and traders of the towns. The campaigns in Wales, France and Scotland left Edward deeply in debt, and the taxation required to meet those debts meant enrolling national support for his policies.
To raise money, Edward summoned Parliament - up to 1286 he summoned Parliaments twice a year. (Parliament came from the 'parley' or talks which the King had with larger groups of advisers.) In 1295, when money was needed to wage war against Philip of France (who had confiscated the duchy of Gascony), Edward summoned the most comprehensive assembly ever summoned in England. This became known as the Model Parliament, for it represented various estates: barons, clergy, and knights and townspeople. By the end of Edward's reign,
Parliament usually contained representatives of all these estates. Edward used his royal authority to establish the rights of the Crown
at the expense of traditional feudal privileges, to promote the uniform administration of justice, to raise income to meet the costs of war and government, and to codify the legal system. In doing so, his methods emphasised the role of Parliament and the common law. With the able help of his Chancellor, Robert Burnell, Bishop of Bath and Wells, Edward introduced much new legislation. He began by commissioning a thorough survey of local government (with the results entered into documents known as the Hundred Rolls), which not only defined royal rights and possessions but also revealed administrative abuses. The First Statute of Westminster (1275) codified 51 existing laws - many originating from Magna Carta - covering areas ranging from extortion by royal officers, lawyers and bailiffs, methods of procedure in civil and criminal cases to freedom of elections. Edward's first Parliament also enacted legislation on wool, England's most important export at the time. At the request of the merchants, Edward was given a customs grant on wool and hides which amounted to nearly £10,000 a year. Edward also obtained income from the licence fees imposed by the Statute of Mortmain (1279), under which gifts of land to the Church (often made to evade death duties) had to have a royal licence. The Statutes of Gloucester (1278) and Quo Warranto (1290) attempted to define and regulate feudal jurisdictions, which were an obstacle to royal authority and to a uniform system of justice for all; the Statute of Winchester (1285) codified the policing system for preserving public order. Other statutes had a long-term effect on land law and on the feudal framework in England. The Second Statute of Westminster (1285) restricted the alienation of land and kept entailed estates within families: tenants were only tenants for life and not able to sell the property to others. The Third Statute of Westminster or Quia Emptores (1290) stopped subinfeudation (in which tenants of land belonging to the King or to barons subcontracted their properties and related feudal services). Edward's assertion that the King of Scotland owed feudal allegiance to him, and the embittered Anglo-Scottish relations leading to war which followed, were to overshadow the rest of Edward's reign in what was to become known as the 'Great Cause'. Under a treaty of 1174, William the Lion of Scotland had become the vassal to Henry II, but in 1189 Richard I had absolved William from his allegiance. Intermarriage between the English and Scottish royal houses promoted peace between the two countries until the premature death of Alexander III in 1286. In 1290, his granddaughter and heiress, Margaret the 'Maid of Norway' (daughter of the King of Norway, she was pledged to be married to Edward's then only surviving son, Edward of Caernarvon), also died. For Edward, this dynastic blow was made worse by the death in the same year of his much-loved wife Eleanor (her body was ceremonially carried from Lincoln to Westminster for burial, and a memorial cross erected at every one of the twelve resting places, including what became known as Charing Cross in London). In the absence of an obvious heir to the Scottish throne, the disunited Scottish magnates invited Edward to determine the dispute. In order to gain acceptance of his authority in reaching a verdict, Edward sought and obtained recognition from the rival claimants that he had the 'sovereign lordship of Scotland and the right to determine our several pretensions'. In November 1292, Edward and his 104 assessors gave the whole kingdom to John Balliol or Baliol as the claimant closest to the royal line; Balliol duly swore loyalty to Edward and was crowned at Scone. John Balliol's position proved difficult. Edward insisted that Scotland was not independent and he, as sovereign lord, had the right to hear in England appeals against Balliol's judgements in Scotland. In 1294, Balliol lost authority amongst Scottish magnates by going to Westminster after receiving a summons from Edward; the magnates decided to seek allies in France and concluded the 'Auld Alliance' with France (then at war with England over the duchy of Gascony) - an alliance which was to influence Scottish history for the next 300 years. In March 1296, having failed to negotiate a
settlement, the English led by Edward sacked the city of Berwick near the River Tweed. Balliol formally renounced his homage to Edward in April 1296, speaking of 'grievous and intolerable injuries ... for instance by summoning us outside our realm ... as your own whim dictated ... and so ... we renounce the fealty and homage which we have done to you'. Pausing to design and start the rebuilding of Berwick as the financial capital of the country, Edward's forces overran remaining Scottish resistance. Scots leaders were taken hostage, and Edinburgh Castle, amongst others, was seized. Balliol surrendered his realm and spent the rest of his life in exile in England and Normandy. Having humiliated Balliol, Edward's insensitive policies in Scotland continued: he appointed a trio of Englishmen to run the country (ignoring the claim of Robert the Bruce to the Scottish Crown). Edward had the Stone of Scone - also known as the Stone of Destiny on which Scottish sovereigns had been crowned - removed to London and subsequently placed in the Coronation Chair in Westminster Abbey (where it remained until it was returned to Scotland in 1996). Edward never built stone castles on strategic sites in Scotland, as he had done so successfully in Wales - possibly because he did not have the funds for another ambitious castle-building programme. By 1297, Edward was facing the biggest crisis in his reign, and his
commitments outweighed his resources. Chronic debts were being incurred by wars against France, in Flanders, Gascony and Wales as
well as Scotland; the clergy were refusing to pay their share of the costs, with the Archbishop of Canterbury threatening excommunication; Parliament was reluctant to contribute to Edward's expensive and unsuccessful military policies; the Earls of Hereford and Norfolk refused to serve in Gascony, and the barons presented a formal statement of their grievances. In the end, Edward was forced to reconfirm the Charters (including Magna Carta) to obtain the money he required; the Archbishop was eventually suspended in 1306 by the new Gascon Pope Clement V; a truce was declared with France in 1297, followed by a peace treaty in 1303 under which the French king restored the duchy of Gascony to Edward. In Scotland, Edward pursued a series of campaigns from 1298 onwards. William Wallace had risen in Balliol's name and recovered most of Scotland, before being defeated by Edward at the battle of Falkirk in 1298. (Wallace escaped, only to be captured in 1305 allegedly by
the treachery of a fellow Scot and taken to London, where he was executed.) In 1304, Edward summoned a full Parliament (which elected
Scottish representatives also attended), in which arrangements for the settlement of Scotland were made. The new government in Scotland
featured a Council, which included Robert Bruce. Bruce unexpectedly rebelled in 1306 by killing a fellow counsellor and was crowned king
of Scotland at Scone. Despite his failing health, Edward was carried north to pursue another campaign, but he died en route at Burgh on
Sands on 7 July 1307 aged 68. According to chroniclers, Edward requested that his bones should be carried on Scottish campaigns and that his heart be taken to the Holy Land. However, Edward was buried at Westminster Abbey in a plain black marble tomb, which in later years was painted with the words Scottorum malleus (Hammer of the Scots) and Pactum serva (Keep troth). Throughout the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, the Exchequer paid to keep candles burning 'round the body of the Lord Edward, formerly King of England, of famous memory'.

Family 1

Countess Eleanor (?) de Ponthieu b. 1244, d. November 28, 1290
Children

Family 2

, b. 1281

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).
  3. [S4447] Internet Site: Wikopedia The Free Encyclopedia).