HRH King Henry Plantagenet III of England1

M, #3331, b. October 10, 1206, d. November 16, 1272
Father*King John Plantagenet I of England1 b. December 24, 1166, d. October 19, 1216
Mother*Isabella Taillefer, Queen of England b. 1185
King Henry III
     He was styled as "Rex Angliae, Dominus Hiberniae, et Dux Aquitaniae". He left off the "Dux Normaniae" of his predecessors.2 HRH King Henry Plantagenet III of England, son of King John Plantagenet I of England and Isabella Taillefer, Queen of England, was born on October 10, 1206 in Winchester, Hampshire, England.1,2
He held the title of King of England during the period 1216 to 1272.2 His coronation as King of England was held on October 28, 1216 at Gloucester Cathedral, Gloucestershire, England. He was crowned by Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester.2
Gloucester Cathedral
His coronation as King of England was held on May 17, 1220 at Westminster Abbey, London, Middlesex, England. He was crowned by Stephen Langton, Archbishop of Canterbury.2
Henry married Eleanor Berenger, Eleanor of Provence on January 14, 1236 at Canterbury, Kent, England.2
Henry died on November 16, 1272 in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffok, England, at age 66.2 He was buried in November, 1272 in Westminster Abbey in London, Middlesex, England.2
Westminster Abbey

Henry III, the first monarch to be crowned in his minority, inherited the throne at age nine. His reign began immersed in the rebellion created by his father, King John. London and most of the southeast were in the hands of the French Dauphin Louis and the northern regions were under the control of rebellious barons - only the midlands and southwest were loyal to the boy king. The barons, however, rallied under Henry's first regent, William the Marshall, and expelled the French Dauphin in 1217. William the Marshall governed until his death in 1219; Hugh de Burgh, the last of the justiciars to rule with the power of a king, governed until Henry came to the throne in earnest at age twenty-five.
(http://www.britannia.com.)

Family

Eleanor Berenger, Eleanor of Provence b. 1222
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

King John Plantagenet I of England1,2

M, #3332, b. December 24, 1166, d. October 19, 1216
Father*HRH King Henry Plantagenet II of England1 b. March 5, 1133, d. July 6, 1189
Mother*Eleanor of Aquitaine "The Eagle", Duchess of Aquitane b. 1122, d. April 1, 1204
King John I of England
     He was styled as "Joannes Rex Anglia et Dominus Hiberniae, Dux Normanaie et Aquitaniae et Comes Andigaviae".3 King John Plantagenet I of England, son of HRH King Henry Plantagenet II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine "The Eagle", Duchess of Aquitane, was born on December 24, 1166 in Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.1,3
John (his first marriage) married Isabel of Gloucester (?) on August 29, 1189 at Marlborough, Wiltshire, England.3
He held the title of King of England during the period 1199 to 1216.3 His coronation as King of England was held on May 27, 1199 at Westminster Abbey, London, Middlesex, England. He was crowned by Hubert Walter, Archbishop of Canterbury.3
Westminster Abbey
The marriage of King John Plantagenet I of England and Isabel of Gloucester (?) was annulled before 1200. by reason of consanguinity.
CONSANGUINITY - The relation subsisting among all the different persons descending from the same stock or common ancestor. Some portion of the blood of the common ancestor flows through the veins of all his descendants, and though mixed with the blood flowing from many other families, yet it constitutes the kindred or alliance by blood between any two of the individuals. This relation by blood is of two kinds; lineal and collateral.
Lineal consanguinity is that relation which exists among persons, where one is descended from the other, as between the son and the father or the grandfather, and so upwards in a direct ascending line; and between the father and the son or the grandson, and so downwards in a direct descending line. Every generation in this direct course makes a degree, computing either in the ascending or descending line. This being the natural mode of computing the degrees of lineal consanguinity, it has been adopted by the civil, the canon, and the common law.
Collateral consanguinity is the relation subsisting among persons who descend from the same commnon ancestor, but not from each other. It is essential to constitute this relation, that they spring from the same common root or stock, but in different branches. The mode of computing the degrees is to discover the common ancestor and, beginning with him to reckon downwards, so the degree the two persons, or the more remote of them, is distant from the ancestor is the degree of kindred subsisting between them. For instance, two brothers are related to each other in the first degree because from the father to each of them is one degree. An uncle and a nephew are related to each other in the second degree, because the nephew is two degrees distant from the common ancestor, and the rule of computation is extended to the remotest degrees of collateral relationship. This is the mode of computation by the common and canon law. The method of computing by the civil law is to begin at either of the persons in question and count up to the common ancestor, and then downwards to the other person, calling it a degree for each person, both ascending and descending, and the degrees they stand from each other is the degree in which they stand related. Thus, from a nephew to his father is one degree; to the grandfather, two degrees and then to the uncle, three; which points out the relationship.
The mode of the civil law is preferable, for it points out the actual degree of kindred in all cases; by the mode adopted by the common law different relations may stand in the same degree. The uncle and nephew stand related in the second degree by the common law, as are two first cousins or two sons of two brothers. But by the civil law the uncle and nephew are in the third degree and the cousins are in the fourth. However, the mode of computation is immaterial as both will establish the same person to be the heir.3 John was the illegitimate daughter of King John Plantagenet I of England, she was born circa 1200 was the father of an illegitimate daughter, Joan Plantagenet, who was born circa 1200.3
John (his first marriage) married Isabella Taillefer, Queen of England on August 24, 1200 at départment of Gironde, région of Aquitaine, France.3
John died on October 19, 1216 at Newark Castle in Nottinghamshire, England, at age 49 of dysentery.3 He was buried in October, 1216 in Worcester Cathedral (Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary) in Worcester, Worcestershire, England.3
Famous as the king who signed the Magna Carta in 1215, John was the youngest and favourite son of Henry II. On his father's death in 1189 his brother, Richard, became king. John received titles, lands and money, but this was not enough. In October 1190 Richard recognized his nephew, Arthur, as his heir. Three years later, when Richard was imprisoned in Germany, John tried to seize control. He was unsuccessful and, when Richard returned in early 1194, was banished. The two were soon reconciled and, when Arthur was captured by Philip II in 1196, Richard named John heir.

Three years later Richard was dead and John was king. War with France was renewed, triggered by John's second marriage. While asked to mediate between the rival families of Lusignan and Angoulême, he married the Angoulême heiress Isabella, who had been betrothed to Hugh de Lusignan. The Lusignans were not amused. A rebellion broke out and John was ordered to appear before his overlord in France, Philip II. He never showed up; war followed.

A good start rapidly spiralled downhill and, by 1206, he had lost Normandy, Anjou, Maine and parts of Poitou. These failures were a damaging blow to John's prestige and he was determined to win them back. This required money. His government became increasingly ruthless and efficient in its financial administration. Taxes soared and he began to exploit his feudal rights ever more harshly.

This heavy taxation bred increasing baronial discontent. An unsuccessful plot to remove him made matters worse. Negotiations between John and his barons failed and civil war broke out in May 1215. When the rebels seized London, John was compelled to negotiate further and, on 19th June at Runnymede, he accepted the baronial terms embodied in the Magna Carta, which ensured feudal rights and restated English law.

This settlement was soon rendered impractical by the more stubborn barons and John's appeal to Pope Innocent. Innocent took his side and in the ensuing civil war John laid waste to the northern counties and the Scottish border. But he then had to face Prince Louis of France, who invaded at the barons' request. John continued to wage war vigorously but died, leaving the issues undecided. His death enabled a compromise peace that restored the rebels and the succession of his son Henry III.
(http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/john_i_king.shtml.)

Family 1

Isabel of Gloucester (?) b. 1169

Family 2

Child

Family 3

Isabella Taillefer, Queen of England b. 1185
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S4447] Internet Site: Wikopedia The Free Encyclopedia).
  3. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

HRH King Henry Plantagenet II of England1,2

M, #3333, b. March 5, 1133, d. July 6, 1189
Father*Count Geoffrey De Gatinais IV of Anjou1 b. August 24, 1113, d. September 7, 1151
Mother*HRH Queen Matilda (?) of England b. February 7, 1102, d. September 10, 1167
Henry II, King of England
     His sobriquet was "Curt Mantle", "Fitz Empress" or "The Lion of Justice."2 He was styled as "Rex Angliae, Dux Normnaniae et Aquitaniae et Comes Andigavaie".3 HRH King Henry Plantagenet II of England, son of Count Geoffrey De Gatinais IV of Anjou and HRH Queen Matilda (?) of England, was born on March 5, 1133 in Le Mans, Maine canton, départment of Sarthe, région of Pays de la Loire, France.3 He held the titles of Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy during the period 1151 to 1189.3
He held the title of Duke of Aquitaine during the period 1152 to 1189.3
Henry married Eleanor of Aquitaine "The Eagle", Duchess of Aquitane, daughter of William X, Duke of Aquitaine and Aenor Aimery, on May 18, 1152 at Poitiers, Poitou, France. she brought with her 42 gowns, 14 pairs of shoe, 5 mantles and 10 undershirts.3
He held the title of King of England during the period 1154 to 1189.3 His coronation as King of England was held on December 19, 1154 at Westminster Abbey, London, Middlesex, England. He was crowned by Theobald, Archbishop of Canterbury.3
Westminster Abbey

Henry died on July 6, 1189 in Chinon canton, départment of Centre, région of Indre-et-Louire, France, at age 56.3 He was buried in July, 1189 in Fontevraud Abbey in Anjou canton, départment of Maine-et-Loire, région of Pays de la Loire, France.3
Fonetevraud Abbey

Henry II, first of the Angevin kings, was one of the most effective of all England's monarchs. He came to the throne amid the anarchy of Stephen's reign and promptly collared his errant barons. He refined Norman government and created a capable, self-standing bureaucracy. Henry survived wars, rebellion, and controversy to successfully rule one of the Middle Ages' most powerful kingdoms.
Henry was raised in the French province of Anjou and first visited England in 1142 to defend his mother's claim to the disputed throne of Stephen. His continental possessions were already vast before his coronation: He acquired Normandy and Anjou upon the death of his father in September 1151, and his French holdings more than doubled with his marriage to Eleanor of Aquitane (ex-wife of King Louis VII of France). In accordance with the Treaty of Wallingford, a succession agreement signed by Stephen and Matilda in 1153, Henry was crowned in October 1154. The continental empire ruled by Henry and his sons included the French counties of Brittany, Maine, Poitou, Touraine, Gascony, Anjou, Aquitane, and Normandy. Henry was technically a feudal vassal of the king of France but, in reality, owned more territory and was more powerful than his French lord. Although King John (Henry's son) lost most of the English holdings in France, English kings laid claim to the French throne until the fifteenth century. Henry also extended his territory in the British Isles in two significant ways. First, he retrieved Cumbria and Northumbria form Malcom IV of Scotland and settled the Anglo-Scot border in the North. Secondly, although his success with Welsh campaigns was limited, Henry invaded Ireland and secured an English presence on the island.
(www.britania.com.)

Family

Eleanor of Aquitaine "The Eagle", Duchess of Aquitane b. 1122, d. April 1, 1204
Children

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S4447] Internet Site: Wikopedia The Free Encyclopedia).
  3. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Count Geoffrey De Gatinais IV of Anjou1,2

M, #3334, b. August 24, 1113, d. September 7, 1151
Father*Fulk V "The Younger", Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem1 b. 1092, d. November 13, 1144
Mother*, Countess of Maine b. 1095
     His sobriquet was Le Bel. Count Geoffrey De Gatinais IV of Anjou, son of Fulk V "The Younger", Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem and , Countess of Maine, was born on August 24, 1113.1,2
Geoffrey married HRH Queen Matilda (?) of England, daughter of HRH King Henry I Norman "Beauclerc" of England and Matilda Dunkeld, on August 26, 1127 at Le Mans, Maine canton, départment of Sarthe, région of Pays de la Loire, France.2
He was knighted by King Henry I on June 10, 1128, in Rouen.2
He held the title of County of Anjou during the period 1129 to 1151.2
He held the title of Duke of Normandy during the period 1144 to 1151.2 He abdicated before 1150.2
Geoffrey died on September 7, 1151 in Sarthe, at age 38.1,2 He was buried in September, 1151 in Le Mans Cathedral (Cathédrale St-Julien du Mans) in Le Mans, Maine canton, départment of Sarthe, région of Pays de la Loire, France.2

Family

HRH Queen Matilda (?) of England b. February 7, 1102, d. September 10, 1167
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Fulk V "The Younger", Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem1

M, #3335, b. 1092, d. November 13, 1144
Father*Count Fulk De Gatinais IV of Anjou1 b. 1043, d. April 14, 1109
Mother*Bertrada de Montfort b. 1059
     Fulk of Anjou, king of Jerusalem (1092-1143), was the son of Fulk IV, count of Anjou, and his wife Bertrada (who ultimately deserted her husband and became the mistress of Philip I of France).
He became count of Anjou (as Fulk V) in 1109. He was originally an opponent of Henry I of England and a supporter of Louis VI of France, but in 1127 he allied with Henry when Henry arranged for his daughter Matilda to marry Fulk's son Geoffrey Plantagenet.

Fulk visited the Holy Land in 1120, and become a close friend of the Templars. After his return he began to subsidize the Templars and also maintained two knights in the Holy Land for a year. In 1128 he was preparing to return to the East when he received an embassy from King Baldwin II of Jerusalem who had no male heir to succeed him. Baldwin arranged for Fulk to marry his daughter Melisende, which would allow Fulk to succeed Baldwin as king. Fulk accepted the offer and in 1129 he and Melisende were married, with the towns of Acre and Tyre as her dowry.

In 1131 Fulk became king of Jerusalem when Baldwin II died. The kingdom under Fulk was prosperous, and at the beginning of his reign he also acted as regent of the Principality of Antioch. As regent he had Raymund of Poitou marry the infant Constance, daughter of Bohemund II of Antioch. However, the greatest concern during Fulk's reign was the rise of atabeg Zengi of Mosul.

In 1137 Fulk was defeated near Barin. Fulk then allied with the vizier of Damascus, who was also threatened by Zengi, and was able to capture the fort of Banias, to the north of Lake Tiberias. Fulk also strengthened the kingdom to the south. His butler Paganus built the fortress of Kerak to the south of the Dead Sea, and to help give the kingdom access to the Red Sea, Fulk had Blanche Garde and other forts built in the south-west to overpower the Egyptian fortress at Ascalon.

In 1137 and 1142, Byzantine emperor John II Comnenus arrived in Syria attempting to impose Byzantine control over the Crusader States. John's arrival was ignored by Fulk, who declined an invitation to meet John in Jerusalem. Fulk died in 1143, leaving two sons who both became kings, as Baldwin III and Amalric I.

William of Tyre described Fulk as a capable soldier and politician, who defended both the kingdom and the church, reflecting the policies of his predecessors Baldwin I and Baldwin II. William felt that the major fault of Fulk's reign was his inattention to the defense of the states to the north against the invasions of Zengi, which culminated in the fall of the County of Edessa in 1143.

(http://www.fact-index.com/f/fu/fulk_of_jerusalem.html.) His family name was de Gatinais.2 Fulk V "The Younger", Count of Anjou and King of Jerusalem, son of Count Fulk De Gatinais IV of Anjou and Bertrada de Montfort, was born in 1092.2
He held the title of Count of Anjou during the period 1109 to 1129.2
     He held the title of County of Maine from 1110 to 1129.2
Fulk married , Countess of Maine on July 11, 1110.2 He abdicated his titles of Count of Anjou and Count of Maine in 1129.2
Fulk married Melisande (?), Queen of Jerusalem in 1129 at Jerusalem, Israel.2
     He was the King of Jerusalem from 1131 to 1143.2 His coronation as King of Jerusalem was held on September 14, 1131 at Jerusalem, Israel.2
Fulk died on November 13, 1144 in Acre (Akko), Israel.1,2

Family 1

, Countess of Maine b. 1095
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Count Fulk De Gatinais IV of Anjou1,2

M, #3336, b. 1043, d. April 14, 1109
Father*Geoffrey Ferole of Gastiorus1
Mother*Ermengard d'Anjou b. 1018, d. March 21, 1076
     His sobriquet was "The Rude", "The Contrary" or "The Surly." Count Fulk De Gatinais IV of Anjou, son of Geoffrey Ferole of Gastiorus and Ermengard d'Anjou, was born in 1043.2
Fulk (his first marriage) married Hildegard de Beaugency circa 1062.2
He held the title of Count of Anjou during the period 1068 to 1109.2
Fulk (his second marriage) married Bertrada de Montfort in 1089.2
Fulk died on April 14, 1109.1,2
Fulk IV of Anjou (1043-1109), also known as Fulk le Réchin, was Count of Anjou from 1068 to 1109.
The nickname by which he is usually referred has no certain translation. Philologists have made numerous very different suggestions, including "quarreler", "sullen", and "heroic".

He was the younger son of Geoffrey (sometimes known as Alberic), count of Gâtinais, and Ermengarde of Anjou, a daughter of Fulk Nera, count of Anjou, and sister of Geoffrey Martel, also count of Anjou.

When Geoffrey Martel died without direct heirs he left Anjou to his nephew Geoffrey IV of Anjou, Fulk le Réchin's older brother.

Fulk fought with his brother, whose ruled was deemed incompetent, and captured him in 1067. Under pressure from the Church he released Geoffrey. The two brothers soon fell to fighting again, and the next year Geoffrey was again imprisoned by Fulk, this time for good.

Substantial territory was lost to Angevin control due to the difficulties resulting from Geoffrey's poor rule and the subsequent civil war. Saintonge was lost, and Fulk had to give the Gâtinais to Philip I of France to placate the king.

Much of Fulk's rule was devoted to regaining control over the Angevin baronage, and to a complex struggle with Normandy for influence in Maine and Brittany.

In 1096 Fulk wrote an incomplete history of Anjou and its rulers, though the authorship and authenticity of this work is disputed. If he did write it, it is one of the first medieval works of history written by a layman.

Fulk may have married as many as five times; there is some doubt regarding two of the marriages.

His first wife was Ermengarde de Beaugency. After her death he married Ermengarde de Borbon, and then possibly Ermengarde de Châtellailon. Both these were repudiated, possibly on grounds of consanguinity.

Next he married Bertrade de Montfort, who apparently left him for Philip I of France. Finally, he may have married a daughter of Walter of Brienne.

He had two sons. The eldest (a son of Ermengarde de Borbon), Geoffrey Martel II, ruled jointly with his father for some time, but died in 1106. The younger (a son of Bertrade de Montfort) succeeded as Fulk V.

He also had a daughter, Ermengarde, who married William VII the Young, count of Poitou and duke of Aquitaine.

References
Jim Bradbury, "Fulk le Réchin and the Origin of the Plantagenets", in Studies in Medieval History Presented to R. Allen Brown.

Family 2

Bertrada de Montfort b. 1059
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Geoffrey Ferole of Gastiorus1

M, #3337
     Geoffrey married Ermengard d'Anjou, daughter of Fulk III "The Black, Nerra", Count of Anjou.

Family

Ermengard d'Anjou b. 1018, d. March 21, 1076
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Earl Humphrey Bohun, 3rd Earl of Herford, 2nd Earl of Essex1,2

M, #3338, b. 1248, d. December 31, 1297
Father*Humphrey Bohun1 d. circa 1265
Mother*Eleanor de Braose1
     He held the title of Earl of Hereford.3
He held the title of Earl of Essex.3 Earl Humphrey Bohun, 3rd Earl of Herford, 2nd Earl of Essex, son of Humphrey Bohun and Eleanor de Braose, was born in 1248.1,3
Humphrey married Maude de Fiennes, daughter of Enguerran II de Fiennes and Daughter of de Conde, in 1275.1,3
Humphrey died on December 31, 1297.1,3 He was buried in January, 1298 in Walden, Essex, England.3

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3335] 1870 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Samuel S. Williams household.
  3. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Maude de Fiennes1

F, #3339
Father*Enguerran II de Fiennes
Mother*Daughter of de Conde

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Humphrey Bohun1,2

M, #3340, d. circa 1265
Father*Humphrey Bohun 2nd Earl of Hereford, 1st Earl of Essex1 b. 1208, d. September 24, 1275
Mother*Maude d'Eu1
     Humphrey married Eleanor de Braose, daughter of William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny and Eva Marshal.1
Humphrey died circa 1265 at Beeston Castle in Cheshire, England.1,3

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3335] 1870 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Samuel S. Williams household.
  3. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Eleanor de Braose1

F, #3341
Father*William de Braose, Lord of Abergavenny
Mother*Eva Marshal

Family

Humphrey Bohun d. circa 1265
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Humphrey Bohun 2nd Earl of Hereford, 1st Earl of Essex1,2

M, #3342, b. 1208, d. September 24, 1275
Father*Henry de Bohun1 b. 1176, d. 1220
Mother*Maude de Mandiville, Countess of Essex1
     He held the title of Earl of Hereford, awarded 1200.2 Humphrey Bohun 2nd Earl of Hereford, 1st Earl of Essex, son of Henry de Bohun and Maude de Mandiville, Countess of Essex, was born in 1208.1
Humphrey married Maude d'Eu, daughter of Ralph de Lusignan, Count of Eu and (?), Countess of Eu.1
He held the title of Earl of Essex, awarded 1236.2
Humphrey died on September 24, 1275.2

Family

Maude d'Eu
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.
  2. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).

Maude d'Eu1

F, #3343
Father*Ralph de Lusignan, Count of Eu
Mother*(?), Countess of Eu
     Maude d'Eu was also known as Maude de Lusignan.2
Maude married Humphrey Bohun 2nd Earl of Hereford, 1st Earl of Essex, son of Henry de Bohun and Maude de Mandiville, Countess of Essex.2

Family

Humphrey Bohun 2nd Earl of Hereford, 1st Earl of Essex b. 1208, d. September 24, 1275
Child

Citations

  1. [S3332] Internet Site: A Royal Genealogy Database).
  2. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Henry de Bohun1

M, #3344, b. 1176, d. 1220
Father*Humphrey de Bohun IV
Mother*(?), Countess of Hereford1
     Henry de Bohun, son of Humphrey de Bohun IV and (?), Countess of Hereford, was born in 1176.1
Henry married Maude de Mandiville, Countess of Essex, daughter of Geoffrey FitzPiers, 4th Earl of Essex and Beatrice de Say.1
Henry died in 1220.1

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Maude de Mandiville, Countess of Essex1

F, #3345
Father*Geoffrey FitzPiers, 4th Earl of Essex
Mother*Beatrice de Say

Family

Henry de Bohun b. 1176, d. 1220
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Humphrey de Bohun IV1

M, #3346
Father*Humphrey de Bohun III, Lord of Trowbridge1
Mother*Margaret de Pietres1
     Humphrey married (?), Countess of Hereford, daughter of (?), Earl of Huntington and Adelaide de Warren.1

Family

(?), Countess of Hereford
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

(?), Countess of Hereford1

F, #3347
Father*(?), Earl of Huntington
Mother*Adelaide de Warren

Family

Humphrey de Bohun IV
Child

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Humphrey de Bohun III, Lord of Trowbridge1

M, #3348
Father*Humphrey de Bohun II The Great1
Mother*Maude de Salisbury1
     Humphrey married Margaret de Pietres, daughter of Miles de Pitres, 3d Earl of Herford and Sybil.1

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Humphrey de Bohun II The Great1

M, #3350
Father*Humphrey The Old1
     Humphrey married Maude de Salisbury.1

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Maude de Salisbury1

F, #3351
     Maude married Humphrey de Bohun II The Great, son of Humphrey The Old.1

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

Humphrey The Old1

M, #3352

Citations

  1. [S423] Boone Family Tree CD 7.

William Edward Hopen1,2

M, #3353, b. June 8, 1886, d. May 4, 1935
Father*Anton J. Hopen3,4,5,6,7 b. February 10, 1857, d. February 15, 1939
Mother*Rose Clare Martin3,5,6,7 b. February 25, 1865, d. December 28, 1945
ChartsWilliam Bock Descendents
William Bock Descendant Chart (Indented)
     Conflicting evidence placed his birth as having occurred in Kansas.8 William Edward Hopen, son of Anton J. Hopen and Rose Clare Martin, was born on June 8, 1886 in Osage Township, St. Thomas, Cole County, Missouri.9,2,3,10,4,11,5,6,12,13,7,14
William Edward was a farm laborer. in 1900 at Missouri.10
William was enumerated as the son of Anton J. Hopen under the name of "Willie Hopen" on the 1900 U. S. Census of Osage Township, Cole County, Missouri. He was listed as a 13-year-old single white male, born in Missouri as was his father. His mother was born in Ohio. He is able to read, write, and speak English.10
William married Frances Bock, daughter of Joseph Bock and Katherine E. Twehous, on November 17, 1908 at Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri.1,15,16,7
While residing in Pratt, Kansas, William helped to establish a Catholic Church there and later, a window was placed in the church as a memorial for all of his effort.5
William appeared on the 1915 Kansas state census Valley, Pratt County being described as a 29-year-old white male, who rents his home and farm.. Enumerated with him were, his wife Frances Bock, his daughters Luella Veronica Hopen and Pauline A. Hopen, his son Joseph Anthony Hopen.17
In 1917 William Edward Hopen farmed in Valley, Pratt County, Kansas.11 William registered for the draft United States Military on June 5, 1917 at Kansas, in which he is described as a Caucasian, married with three children, of medium height, medium build, with gray eyes and brown hair.11
Frances and William Edward Hopen lived on June 5, 1917 at RFD No. 2 in Cunningham, Kingman County, Kansas. Residing with them were..11
In 1920 William Edward Hopen farmed at South Valley Township in Pratt County, Kansas,and also raised cattle on this farm.9,5
Frances and William Edward Hopen lived in 1920 at South Valley Township in Kansas. Residing with them were, their children Luella, Joseph, Pauline and Raymond..9
William is a head of household on the 1920 U. S. Census of Pratt County, Kansas. He was identified as a 33-year-old white married male, who rents his farm. He is able to read, write, and speak English. He and both of his parents were born in Missouri.. Enumerated with him were: his wife Frances, his son Joseph Anthony and Raymond Edward, his daughter Luella Veronica and Pauline A.9
He is included in a photo taken 1921. He is on the left side of the middle row in the photo. Also included in the photo: Joseph Anthony Hopen, Luella Veronica Hopen, Frances Bock, Raymond Edward Hopen, Pauline A. Hopen and Clarence Herman Hopen Sr.
Bill and Frances Hopen Family
Photograph by Bob

On his return to Missouri, he established a dairy, but ill health soon forced his retirement. After this he engaged in several businesses.5 William Edward Hopen and Frances Bock moved in 1924 from Kansas to Missouri. Moving with William were Luella Veronica Hopen, Joseph Anthony Hopen, Pauline A. Hopen, Raymond Edward Hopen and Clarence Herman Hopen Sr..5
William was a sponsor for William Francis Mertens's baptism on June 29, 1924 at St. Stanislaus Catholic Church, Wardsville, Cole County, Missouri.18
William attended an anniversary party held forPeter Paul Otto Mertens and Mary Bock on April 25, 1926 at Wardsville, Missouri.19
William Edward was a popcorn stand worker. in 1930 at Cole County, Missouri.15
William is a head of household, under the name of "William Hopen", on the 1930 U. S. Census of 1310 Greenberry Road, Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri. He was identified as a 43-year-old white male, married since the age of twenty-two years. He and his parents were born in Missouri. He rents his home for $27.00 per month and does not own a radio set. He is able to read, write, and speak English. He is not a veteran.. Enumerated with him were: his wife Frances, his sons Joseph Anthony, Raymond Edward and Clarence Herman, his daughter Pauline A.15
William Edward Hopen lived in 1933 Moreau Drive, Jefferson City, Missouri.20
William Edward was County Treasurer before 1935 at Missouri.3
William died on May 4, 1935 at Greenberry Road in Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri, at age 48, Frances Bock was the informant on his death certificate.2,3,12,13,7,14 His cause of death was Hypertrophic pulmonary emphysema, myocardial failure, and tricuspid insufficiency.3
His obituary was published in the The News and Tribune on May 5, 1935 at Missouri.5 His obituary stated:
Well Known Local Resident Had Been In Ill Health for Over Year
County Treasurer William E. Hopen Died at his home on the Green Berry Road early Saturday morning after a lingering illness of asthma. Mr. Hopen had not been in good health for more than a year. He was in his office only a few hours a day up to several months ago when he was forced to remain away entirely. His daughter Pauline assumed the duties of the office when his health failed and has been in charge for nearly a year.
Old Family
He was a member of one of the county's oldest and best known families. He was born in St. Thomas June 8, 1866 the son of Mr. and Mrs. Anton J. Hopen. He was reared on a farm there. Nov. 7, 1908, he married Miss Frances Bock,who, with five children, Mrs. Richter of St. Louis, Joseph, Raymond and Clarence and Miss Pauline Hopen all of this city, in addition to his aged parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Hopen, survives. Mr. Hopen resided for some time in Pratt, Kan., where he conducted a cattle farm. While there he helped to establish a Catholic parish there and in recognition of his services a memorial window was placed in the church for him.
Returned in 1924
He returned to Jefferson City in 1924 and established a dairy but ill health quickly forced his retirement. He engaged in various businesses here until 1933 when he was elected county treasurer. Unless the legislature changes the law he will be the county's treasurer, the office having been abolished.
5
William Edward Hopen was buried on May 7, 1935 in St. Peters Catholic Cemetery in Jefferson City, Cole County, Missouri, With his wife, Frances Bock Hopen in Row 6, Block B.3,12,7
William Edward and Frances Bock Hopen Tombstone

William was mentioned in Frances Bock's obituary on July 6, 1968 as preceding the deceased in death.22
William was mentioned in Joseph Anthony Hopen's obituary in June, 1986 as preceding the deceased in death.1,23

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1900Osage Township, Cole County, MissouriAnton J. Hopen10
1915Valley, Pratt County, KansasWilliam Edward Hopen17
1920Pratt County, KansasWilliam Edward Hopen9
19301310 Greenberry Road, Jefferson City, Cole County, MissouriWilliam Edward Hopen15

Family

Frances Bock b. May 17, 1885, d. July 4, 1968
Children

Citations

  1. [S635] Joseph A. Hopen Obituary, June 15, 1986.
  2. [S6142] Betty Hageman Smith Letter.
  3. [S6282] William Edward Hopen Death Certificate.
  4. [S6344] Missouri Birth Records, 1851-1910, Ancestry.com (database online), 2007.
  5. [S6571] William E. Hopen Obituary, May 5, 1935.
  6. [S6424] Correspondence, Betty Hageman Smith to Linda Frank Berg.
  7. [S7226] Judy Richter Holzhauser, Family Group Sheet for Descendants of Frances Bock Family.
  8. [S8972] 1940 — Sixteenth Census of the United States (Population Schedule), Missouri, Joseph Hopen household.
  9. [S3316] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), William E Hopen household.
  10. [S6334] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Anton Hopen household.
  11. [S6352] Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918.
  12. [S7103] Quentin F. Veit, The William Hopen Clan of Missouri, pqge 57.
  13. [S5086] St. Peters Cemetery.
  14. [S7433] Funeral Card for William E. Hopen.
  15. [S6333] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), William Hopen household.
  16. [S6134] Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002, Ancestry.com (database online), 2007, book 6, page 106.
  17. [S6357] 1915 Kansas State Census, Valley, Pratt County, Kansas, Kansas State Census COllection, 1855-1915.
  18. [S2516] St. Stanislaus Catholic Church, St Stanislaus, Wardsville Church Record Book.
  19. [S6610] Jefferson City Tribune "April 28, 1926, page 6, column 5."
  20. [S6447] Jefferson City Post-Tribune "issue of March 1, 1933."
  21. [S552] Tombstone photo, taken by Taken by Linda A. Frank Berg.
  22. [S6350] Frances Bock Hopen Obituary, July 6, 1968.
  23. [S3238] Obituary of Joseph A. Hopen.

Lumina Wilson1

F, #3354
     Lumina married Simon Hankey circa 1870.1

Family

Simon Hankey b. 1821
Children

Citations

  1. [S31] Maries County, Missouri Message Board.
  2. [S388] Historical Society of Maries County, Maries County, Missouri, Volume II, page 251.

Ralph de Neville, 1st Earl of Westmoreland

M, #3355
     Ralph married Joan de Beaufort.

Family

Joan de Beaufort
Child

Joan de Beaufort

F, #3356

Ralph de Lusignan, Count of Eu

M, #3357
Father*Hugh de Lusignan VIII
Mother*Bourgogne de Rancon
     Ralph married (?), Countess of Eu.

(?), Countess of Eu

F, #3358

Hugh de Lusignan VIII

M, #3359
     Hugh married Bourgogne de Rancon.

Bourgogne de Rancon

F, #3360
     Bourgogne married Hugh de Lusignan VIII.