(?) Howard1

M, #4081
ChartsOndzeg Matiegu Descendant Chart (Indented)
     (?) married Irene M. Weber, daughter of William Charles Weber and Anna A. Wallach.1

Family

Irene M. Weber b. 1908

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

(?) Hagemeister1

M, #4082
ChartsOndzeg Matiegu Descendant Chart (Indented)
     (?) married Mary A. Weber, daughter of William Charles Weber and Anna A. Wallach.1

Family

Mary A. Weber b. 1910

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

(?) Becker1

M, #4083
ChartsOndzeg Matiegu Descendant Chart (Indented)
     (?) married Wilma A. Weber, daughter of William Charles Weber and Anna A. Wallach.1

Family

Wilma A. Weber b. September, 1912

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

(?) Orth1

M, #4084
ChartsOndzeg Matiegu Descendant Chart (Indented)
     (?) married Helen L. Weber, daughter of William Charles Weber and Anna A. Wallach.1

Family

Helen L. Weber b. March, 1915

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

Konrad Ulz Jr.1,2

M, #4085, b. August 25, 1905, d. January, 1961
Father*Konrad Ulz3 b. 1877
Mother*Bibiana Eqarter b. 1886, d. 1968
     Konrad Ulz Jr., son of Konrad Ulz and Bibiana Eqarter, was born on August 25, 1905 in Austria.4,2 Conflicting evidence placed his birth in 1906 (1920 census.)2
Konrad lived with his parents, Bibiana, in 1908 in Huttenberg, Austria.5
Konrad immigrated along with Bibiana Eqarter on April 21, 1908 at New York, New York County, New York, traveling on the S. S. Zeeland.5
Konrad Ulz Jr. was naturalized in 1919 in Illinois.2
Konrad was enumerated as the son of Konrad Ulz on the 1920 U. S. Census of Gillespie Township, Gillespie, Macoupin County, Illinois. He was listed as a 14-year-old male born in Austria and was attending school.2
Konrad married Hazel F. Young, daughter of W. C. Young, in 1928.3,6
Konrad was a coal miner in 1930.6
Konrad Ulz Jr. and Hazel F. Young lived in 1930 706 Spruce Street, Gillespie, Macoupin County, Illinois.6
Konrad is a head of household on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 2, Gillespie, Macoupin County, Illinois. He was identified as a 24-year-old male born in Austria as were his parents. He was renting a home for $15.00 per month and did not have a radio.He was married at the age of 22. Enumerated with him was his wife, Hazel F.6
Konrad died in January, 1961 at age 55.4

Family

Hazel F. Young b. 1908
Child

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S2141] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Konrad Ulz household.
  3. [S1553] Mr. and Mrs. William C. Ulz Twins Obituary, c 1957.
  4. [S358] Social Security Death Index, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.
  5. [S2724] Inc. The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, "Ellis Island Passenger Records" database.
  6. [S6990] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Conrad Ulz household.

Fred H. Sass1

M, #4086, b. October, 1864
Father*Fred Sass2 b. 1822
Mother*Ernestina (?)2 b. 1828, d. before 1900
     Fred H. Sass, son of Fred Sass and Ernestina (?), was born in October, 1864 in Missouri.1,3,4 Conflicting evidence placed his birth in Germany (1880 & 1900 census.)2,3
Fred H. immigrated along with Fred Sass in 1866 or 1868.3,5

Fred H. was a farm laborer in 1880.2
He lived with his parents, Ernestina and Fred, in 1880 in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.2
Fred was enumerated as the son of Fred Sass on the 1880 U. S. Census of Missouri. He was listed as a single 17-year-old male born in Germany as were his parents.2
Fred married Pauline Mengenwith in 1888.1,3
Fred H. was a carpenter in 1900.3
He lived with his father-in-law, Fred H. Sass and mother-in-law, Pauline Mengenwith in 1900 at South Stafford Street in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.3
Fred is a head of household on the 1900 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri. He was identified as a 35-year-old male born in Germany as were his parents. He had been married for 12 years and owned a home which was mortgaged. Enumerated with him were: his wife Pauline, his sons Walter H., Erwin A., Carl H., Fred Edward and Julius Martin John, his daughter Ella his father, Fred.3
Fred H. was a home builder in 1910 at Missouri.5
Pauline and Fred H. Sass lived in 1910 in Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Walter, Erwin, Carl, Ella, Fred, Julius and Alfred..5
Fred is a head of household, under the name of "Frederich Sasse", on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Missouri. He was identified as a 47-year-old male born in Germany, his parents were also born in Germany; he owned a home which was not mortgaged. This was his first marriage; they had been married for 21 years. Enumerated with him were: his wife Pauline, his sons Walter H., Erwin A., Carl H., Fred Edward, Julius Martin John and Alfred J., his daughter Ella.5
Fred H. was a carpenter in 1920.1
Pauline and Fred H. Sass lived in 1920 at 5078 Minerva in St. Louis, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Walter, Carl, Fred, Julius and Alfred, their son-in-law Pauline Mengenwith..1
Fred is a head of household on the 1920 U. S. Census of Ward 26, St. Louis, Missouri. He was identified as a married 57-year-old male born in Missouri, his parents were born in Germany; he owned a home which was mortgaged. Enumerated with him were: his wife Pauline, his sons Walter H., Carl H., Fred Edward, Julius Martin John and Alfred J.1 Fred H. Sass retired before 1930.4
Pauline and Fred H. Sass lived in 1930 at 1211 Highland terrace in Richmond Heights, St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were, their child, Walter, their daughter-in-law Pauline Mengenwith..4
Fred is a head of household on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Richmond Heights, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was identified as a 67-year-old male born in Missouri, his parents were born in Germany. He was 26-years-old at time of his first marriage. He owneda home valued at $9,000.00 and a radio; he was not a veteran. Enumerated with him were: his wife Pauline, his son Walter H.4

Family 1

Pauline Mengenwith b. 1873
Children

Family 2

Child

Citations

  1. [S4940] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred H. Sass household.
  2. [S4942] 1880 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred Sass household.
  3. [S4941] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred Sass household.
  4. [S4946] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Frederick Sass household.
  5. [S4948] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Frederich Sasse household.
  6. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

Ella Sass1,2

F, #4087, b. February, 1896
Father*Fred H. Sass1 b. October, 1864
Mother*Pauline Mengenwith b. 1873
     Ella married H. L. Gehlert.1 Ella Sass, daughter of Fred H. Sass and Pauline Mengenwith, was born in February, 1896 in Missouri.2
She lived with her parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1900 at South Stafford Street, Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.2
Ella was enumerated as the daughter of Fred H. Sass on the 1900 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri. She was listed as a four-year-old girl born in Missouri, her parents were born in Germany.2
She lived with her parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1910 at Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.3
Ella was enumerated as the daughter of Fred H. Sass under the name of "Elda Sasse" on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Missouri. She was listed as a 14-year-old female born in Missouri as were her parents; she was attending school.3

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1900Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, MissouriFred H. Sass2
1910Ward 3, MissouriFred H. Sass3

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S4941] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred Sass household.
  3. [S4948] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Frederich Sasse household.

H. L. Gehlert1

M, #4088
     H. married Ella Sass, daughter of Fred H. Sass and Pauline Mengenwith.1

Family

Ella Sass b. February, 1896

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

Walter H. Sass1,2

M, #4089, b. July 16, 1891, d. March, 1978
Father*Fred H. Sass1 b. October, 1864
Mother*Pauline Mengenwith3 b. 1873
     Walter H. Sass, son of Fred H. Sass and Pauline Mengenwith, was born on July 16, 1891 in Washington, Franklin County, Missouri.2,3,4
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1900 at South Stafford Street in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.4
Walter was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass on the 1900 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri. He was listed as an eight-year-old boy born in Missouri, his parents were born in Germany. He had attended school for ten months during the year.4
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1910 in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.5
Walter H. was a cutter in a shoe factory in 1910.5
Walter was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass under the name of "Walter Sasse" on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Missouri. He was listed as a single 18-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents; he was not attending school.5 At the time of his draft registration for World War I in 1917, Walter resided at 5078 Minerva in St. Louis, Missouri.2 He was employed by Swift and Company at 3919 Papin Street, St. Louis, Missouri, in 1917 as a stenographer.2
Walter enlisted in the U. S. Army on May 5, 1917.2
His military serial number was 1,453,321.6
Walter was inducted into the U. S. Army on May 26, 1917 at St. Louis, Missouri.6
Walter served from May 26, 1917 to October 1, 1917 in the U. S. Army. He was assigned to Company I, 5th Infantry, Missouri National Guard.6 Walter registered for the draft for World War I on June 5, 1917 at Draft Board 26, St. Louis, Missouri, he was listed as medium height and build with gray eves and light hair, slightly bald.2
Walter served from October 2, 1917 to September 20, 1918 in the U. S. Army. He was assigned to Company I, 138th Infantry.6
Walter served overseas from May 19, 1918 to April 27, 1919.6
Walter served from June 21, 1918 to September 20, 1918 in the U. S. Army. He was assigned to Company C, 110 Field Signal Battalion.6
Walter served from September 21, 1918 to April 27, 1919 in the U. S. Army. He was assigned to Company B, 110 Field Signal Battalion.6
Walter was released from active military duty on April 27, 1919. He was honorably discharged and had no disablities.6 He was promoted to corporal in October, 1919.6
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1920 at 5078 Minerva in Missouri.3
Walter H. was working at a milling company in 1920.3
Walter was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass on the 1920 U. S. Census of Ward 26, St. Louis, Missouri. He was listed as a single 28-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents.3
Walter married (?) (?) in 1923.7 His wife, (?), died before 1930.7
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1930 at 1211 Highland terrace in Richmond Heights, St. Louis County, Missouri.7
Walter H. was a poultry salesman in 1930 at Missouri.7
Walter was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Richmond Heights, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was listed as a widowed 37-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents. He was married for the first time at the age of 30 and was a veteran of World War I.7 At the time of his death the location for mailing benefits was reported as Rosebud, Gasconade County, Missouri by the Social Security Administration.8
Walter died in March, 1978 at age 86.8

Family

(?) (?) d. before 1930

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S4953] Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.
  3. [S4940] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred H. Sass household.
  4. [S4941] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred Sass household.
  5. [S4948] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Frederich Sasse household.
  6. [S4956] Walter H. Sass, Soldiers Database: War of 1812 - World War I.
  7. [S4946] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Frederick Sass household.
  8. [S358] Social Security Death Index, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.

Carl H. Sass1,2

M, #4090, b. September 27, 1894, d. May, 1974
Father*Fred H. Sass1 b. October, 1864
Mother*Pauline Mengenwith b. 1873
     Carl H. Sass was also known as Charles.3 Carl H. Sass, son of Fred H. Sass and Pauline Mengenwith, was born on September 27, 1894 in Washington, Franklin County, Missouri.4,5,3 Conflicting evidence placed his birth on September 27 1893 (WWI Draft Card.)4
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1900 at South Stafford Street in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.3
Carl was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass on the 1900 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri. He was listed as a five-year-old boy born in Missouri, his parents were born in Germany.3
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1910 in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.6
Carl was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass under the name of "Charles Sasse" on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Missouri. He was listed as a 15-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents; he was attending school.6 Carl H. Sass was employed by Laclede Gas Company at 2922 Easton Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri, in 1917 as an accountant.4 At the time of his registration for the draft during World War I in 1917, Carl resided at 5078 Minerva in St. Louis, Missouri.4
Carl enlisted in the U. S. Army in March, 1917.4
Carl was inducted into the U. S. Army on May 26, 1917 at St. Louis, Missouri.7
Carl served from May 26, 1917 to October 1, 1917 in the U. S. Army. He was assigned to Company L, 5th Infantry, Missouri National Guard.7 Carl registered for the draft for World War I on June 5, 1917 at Draft Board 26, St. Louis, Missouri, he was listed as tall and slender with gray eyes and dark hair.4
Carl served from October 2, 1917 to December 28, 1917 in the U. S. Army. He was assigned to Company L, 138th Infantry.7
Carl served from December 29, 1917 to January 22, 1918 in the U. S. Army. He was assigned to Company C, 110th Field Signal Batallion.7
Carl served from January 23, 1918 to April 27, 1919 in the Pigeon Section, 110th Field Signal Battalion.7
The use of signal communication in WWI was extensive and the tasks of the Signal Corps varied. Some of the tasks were: radio, telephone, photographic, pigeon and other special services.
The pigeon service did not exist in the American Army prior to WWI. Experiments on the Mexican border had been unsuccessful due to the inexperience of the personnel handling the birds. However the Chief Signal Officer of the American Expeditionary Force (A.E.F.) recommended the establishment of a pigeon service as a branch of the Signal Corps and it was quite successful. In the Meuse-Argonne offensive, a total of 442 American birds were used and approximately four hundred messages were delivered."
During World War I, messages were sometimes transmitted by wire (telegraph of field phone), but two-way radio communications had not yet become available. Sometimes a unit was ordered to attack over a broad and often difficult terrain, making it impossible to string the wire necessary for communications. In these situations, a field commander often carried with him several carrier pigeons.
Pigeons served many purposes during the war, racing through the skies with airplanes, or even being fitted with cameras to take pictures of enemy positions. One of the most important roles they served in was as messengers. An important message could be written on a piece of paper, then that paper neatly folded and secured in a small canister attached to a pigeon's leg. Once the pigeon was released, it would try to fly to its home back behind the lines, where the message would be read and transmitted to the proper military planners.
The Army is divided among several different specialties and the men from each specialty are trained for a particular kind of work. Infantrymen are trained to fight on the ground, artillerymen are responsible for the big guns, armor refers to the men who fight in tanks, and the Air Service was the name for the group of soldiers who flew airplanes World War I. One of the oldest of these groups of soldiers is the U. S. Army Signal Corps. These men are the ones responsible for insuring that messages between all units get through to the right people. The Army Signal Corps identifies itself by a torch with two crossed flags. These represent signal flags, a common way that messages were passed using code.
When the United States entered World War I in 1917, the Army Signal Corps was given 600 pigeons for the purpose of passing messages when signal flags or a field phone couldn't do it. The pigeons were donated by bird breeders in Great Britain, and then were trained by American soldiers.
During the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, the 2-month battle that finally ended World War I, 442 pigeons were used in the area of Verdun in France to carry hundreds of messages. This is how the system worked:
When a commander in the field needed to send a message, he first wrote it out on paper, trying to be both brief and yet as detailed as possible. Then he called for one of his Signal Corps officers, who would bring one of the pigeons that went with the soldiers into battle. The message would be put in the capsule on the bird's leg, and then the bird would be tossed high in the air to fly home.
The carrier pigeon would fly back to his home coop behind the lines. When he landed, the wires in the coop would sound a bell or buzzer, and another soldier of the Signal Corps would know a message had arrived. He would go to the coop, remove the message from the canister, and then send it by telegraph, field phone or personal messenger, to the right persons.
Carrier pigeons did an important job. It was also very dangerous. If the enemy soldiers were nearby when a pigeon was released, they knew that the bird would be carrying important messages, and tried their best to shoot the pigeon down so the message couldn't be delivered.
Some of these pigeons became quite famous among the infantrymen they worked for. One pigeon named "The Mocker", flew 52 missions before he was wounded. Another was named "President Wilson". He was injured in the last week of the war and it seemed impossible for him to reach his destination. Though he lost his foot, the message got through and saved a large group of surrounded American infantrymen.
Charles Whittlesey was a lawyer in New York, but when the United States sent out a call for soldiers to help France fight for its freedom, Mr. Whittlesey joined the Army and went to Europe to help. He was made the commander of a battalion of soldiers in the 77th Infantry Division, known as "The Liberty Division" because most of the men came from New York and wore a bright blue patch on their shoulders that had on it the Statue of Liberty.
On October 2, 1918, Major Whittlesey led more than 500 men in an attack that broke through the enemy lines. Major Whittlesey had his men set up defensive positions in a pocket in the dense Argonne Forest, just above a small creek that had been their objective. He didn't know that his battalion was the only one that had broken through the lines. That night enemy soldiers crept in and surrounded the pocket. All alone, ahead of all the other friendly units, Major Whittlesey's battalion was alone, surrounded, and already running low on food, ammunition, and even soldiers just from the fight to get into the Argonne Forest.
Two days later American Artillery men tried to send some protection. The big guns fired hundreds shells into the ravine where the Germans had surrounded Major Whittlesey. The Germans were now attacking the lost battalion with machineguns, rifles and grenades. Unfortunately, the American commanders didn't know exactly where the American soldiers were, and started dropping the big shells right on top of them. It was a horrible situation that might have resulted in Major Whittlesey and all his men getting killed—killed by their own army, no less.
The most famous of the World War I carrier pigeons was named Cher Ami, French words meaning "Dear Friend". Cher Ami spent several months on the front lines. In the fall of 1918 he flew 12 important missions to deliver messages. Perhaps the most important was the message he carried on October 4, 1918.
When his men were being shelled on October 4th, Major Whittlesey called for his last pigeon, Cher Ami. He wrote a quick and simple note, telling the men who directed the artillery guns where his battalion was located and asked them to stop. The note that was put in the canister on Cher Ami's left leg simply said:
"We are along the road parallel to 276.4.
"Our own artillery is dropping a barrage directly on us.
"For heaven's sake, stop it."
As Cher Ami tried to fly back home, the Germans saw him rising out of the brush and opened fire. For several minutes, bullets zipped through the air all around him. It looked at first like the little pigeon was going to fall, that he wasn't going to make it. The doomed American infantrymen were crushed; their last hope was plummeting to earth against a very heavy attack from German bullets.
Somehow Cher Ami managed to spread his wings and start climbing again, higher and higher, beyond the range of the enemy guns. He flew 25 miles in only 25 minutes to deliver his message. A short time later the shelling stopped. More than 200 American lives were saved...all because the little bird wouldn't quit trying.
On his last mission, Cher Ami was badly wounded. When he finally reached his coop, he could fly no longer. The soldier that answered the sound of the bell found the little bird lying on his back, covered in blood. He had been blinded in one eye, and a bullet had hit his breastbone, making a hole the size of a quarter. From that awful hole, hanging by just a few tendons, was the almost severed leg of the brave little bird. Attached to that leg was a silver canister, with the all-important message. Once again, Cher Ami wouldn't quit until he had finished his job.
Major Whittlesey's men had gone for days without food, water, or bandages for the wounded. On the fourth day, Lieutenants Erwin Bleckley and Harold Goettler from the Army's Air Service tried to fly over the lost battalion to drop supplies. It was the first air drop in U.S. Army history.
Despite the heavy enemy fire the brave airmen wouldn't give up. They flew as low as they could to try and find the Lost Battalion. Sadly, their airplane was shot down. They died trying to help their fellow soldiers.
After 5 days the Lost Battalion was found and rescued. The tired men who hadn't eaten for more than 100 hours, marched happily out of the forest.
Of the 500 men who went into the Argonne forest with Major Whittlesey, only 194 remained to march out of the woods with him. They survived because of the heroism of their leaders--and because a little bird named Cher Ami had taught them no matter how bad things get, you can never give up!!
Cher Ami that was the hero of the 77th Infantry Division. Medics worked hard to patch him up. When French soldiers heard about Cher Ami's bravery they gave him one of their greatest honors. Cher Ami was presented a medal called the French Croix de guerre with a palm leaf.
Though the medics saved Cher Ami's life, they couldn't save his leg. Major Whittlesey and his men took care of the little bird that had saved 200 of their friends and even carved a small wooden leg for him. When Cher Ami was well enough to travel he was put on a boat to the United States. The commander of all of the United States Army, General John J. Pershing, personally saw Cher Ami off as he departed France.
Cher Ami died of his multiple war wounds on June 13, 1919--less than a year after he had completed his service to the United States Army Signal Corps. Upon his death a taxidermist preserved the small pigeon for future generations, a bird with a story that became an inspiration to millions over the years.8
Cher Ami Carrier Pigeon

Carl served overseas from May 19, 1918 to April 27, 1919 in the first world war.7 He was promoted to sergeant in U. S. Army in January, 1919.7
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1920 at 5078 Minerva in Missouri.2
Carl H. was working in a dry goods store in 1920.2
Carl was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass on the 1920 U. S. Census of Ward 26, St. Louis, Missouri. He was listed as a single 25-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents.2
Carl married Estella (?) in 1928.9
Carl H. was the manager of a garage in 1930.9 Estella and Carl H. Sass lived in 1930 at 6647 Berchold in St. Louis, Missouri.9
Carl is a head of household on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 24, St. Louis, Missouri. He was identified as a 34-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents. He had been married for two years and was renting a home for $32.50 per month. He was a veteran of the world war. Enumerated with him were: his wife Estella.9
Carl died in May, 1974 at age 79.5

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1900Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, MissouriFred H. Sass3
1910Ward 3, MissouriFred H. Sass6
1920Ward 26, St. Louis, MissouriFred H. Sass2
1930Ward 24, St. Louis, MissouriCarl H. Sass9

Family

Estella (?) b. October 10, 1897, d. April, 1979

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S4940] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred H. Sass household.
  3. [S4941] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred Sass household.
  4. [S4949] Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.
  5. [S358] Social Security Death Index, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.
  6. [S4948] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Frederich Sasse household.
  7. [S4954] Carl H. Sass, Soldiers Database: War of 1812 - World War I.
  8. [S4957] Internet Site: Cher Ami and the Lost Battalion of World War I).
  9. [S4943] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Carl H. Sass household.

Fred Edward Sass1,2,3

M, #4091, b. December 8, 1897
Father*Fred H. Sass1 b. October, 1864
     Fred Edward Sass, son of Fred H. Sass, was born on December 8, 1897 in Missouri.3,4
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1900 at South Stafford Street in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.4
Fred was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass on the 1900 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri. He was listed as a two-year-old boy born in Missouri, his parents were born in Germany.4
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1910 in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.5
Fred was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass under the name of "Frederick Sasse" on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Missouri. He was listed as a 12-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents; he was attending school.5 At the time of his draft registration for World War I in 1918, Fred resided at 5078 Minerva in St. Louis, Missouri.3 He was employed by Brown Shoe Company at 17st Street and Washington Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri, in 1918 as a telephone operator.3 Fred registered for the draft for World War I on September 12, 1918 at Draft Board 26, St. Louis, Missouri, he was described as 5'10" tall with a medium build and brown eyes and hair.3
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1920 at 5078 Minerva in Missouri.2
Fred Edward was a shipping clerk in 1920.2
Fred was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass on the 1920 U. S. Census of Ward 26, St. Louis, Missouri. He was listed as a single 22-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents.2

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1900Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, MissouriFred H. Sass4
1910Ward 3, MissouriFred H. Sass5
1920Ward 26, St. Louis, MissouriFred H. Sass2

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S4940] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred H. Sass household.
  3. [S4952] Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.
  4. [S4941] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred Sass household.
  5. [S4948] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Frederich Sasse household.

Julius Martin John "Jules" Sass1,2,3,4

M, #4092, b. February 10, 1900, d. February, 1968
Father*Fred H. Sass1 b. October, 1864
Mother*Pauline Mengenwith b. 1873
     He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1900 at South Stafford Street in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.5 Julius Martin John "Jules" Sass, son of Fred H. Sass and Pauline Mengenwith, was born on February 10, 1900 in Missouri.6,4,5
Julius was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass on the 1900 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri. He was listed as a three-month-old boy born in Missouri, his parents were born in Germany.5
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1910 in Washington, Frankllin County, Missouri.7
Julius was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass under the name of "Julius Sasse" on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 3, Missouri. He was listed as a ten-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents; he was attending school.7 Julius Martin John "Jules" Sass was employed by Hauschmidt at 5144 Easton Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri, in 1918 as a pattern maker.4 At the time of his registration for the draft for World War I in 1918, Julius resided at 5078 Minerva in St. Louis, Missouri.4 Julius registered for the draft for World War I on September 12, 1918 at Draft Board 26, St. Louis, Missouri, he was listed as tall with blue eyes and light hair.4
He lived with his parents, Pauline and Fred, in 1920 at 5078 Minerva in Missouri.2
Julius Martin John was a pattern maker in 1920.2
Julius married Lillie (?) in 1920.3
Julius was enumerated as the son of Fred H. Sass on the 1920 U. S. Census of Ward 26, St. Louis, Missouri. He was listed as a single 20-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents.2
Julius Martin John was a pattern maker in a pattern shop in 1930.3
Lillie and Julius Martin John "Jules" Sass lived in 1930 at 6410 St. Louis Avenue in St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were, their child, Jules..3
Julius is a head of household on the 1930 U. S. Census of Central Township, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was identified as a 29-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents. He was married for the first time at the age of 20 and owned a home valued at $2,700.00 and was not a veteran. Enumerated with him were: his wife Lillie, his son Jules E.3 At the time of his death the location for mailing benefits was reported as St. Louis, Missouri by the Social Security Administration.6
Julius died in February, 1968.6

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1900Ward 3, Washington, Frankllin County, MissouriFred H. Sass5
1910Ward 3, MissouriFred H. Sass7
1920Ward 26, St. Louis, MissouriFred H. Sass2
1930Central Township, St. Louis County, MissouriJulius Martin John "Jules" Sass3

Family

Lillie (?) b. May 29, 1897, d. January, 1975
Child

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S4940] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred H. Sass household.
  3. [S4945] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Jules J. Sass household.
  4. [S4951] Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.
  5. [S4941] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Fred Sass household.
  6. [S358] Social Security Death Index, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.
  7. [S4948] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Frederich Sasse household.

John Vico1

M, #4093, b. 1879
     John Vico was born in 1879 in Italy.2
John married Angelina (?) in 1904.1,2
John was a charmann in a sugar refinery in 1930 at Contra Costa County, California.2
Angelina and John Vico lived in 1930 at 1414 Frames Street in Crockett, Contra Costa County, California. Residing with them were, their children Enrico, Rose, Avi and Silvio..2

Family

Angelina (?) b. 1885
Children

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S8922] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Vico household.

Angelina (?)1

F, #4094, b. 1885
     Angelina (?) was born in 1885 in Italy.2
Angelina married John Vico in 1904.1,2
Angelina and John Vico lived in 1930 at 1414 Frames Street in Crockett, Contra Costa County, California. Residing with them were, their children Enrico, Rose, Avi and Silvio..2

Family

John Vico b. 1879
Children

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S8922] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Vico household.

Enrico Vico1

M, #4095, b. 1908
Father*John Vico1 b. 1879
Mother*Angelina (?)1 b. 1885
     Enrico Vico, son of John Vico and Angelina (?), was born in 1908 in California.2
He lived with his parents, Angelina and John, in 1930 at 1414 Frames Street in Crockett, Contra Costa County, California.2
Enrico was a sugar tender in a sugar refinery in 1930 at Contra Costa County, California.2

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S8922] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Vico household.

Rose Vico1

F, #4096, b. 1910
Father*John Vico1 b. 1879
Mother*Angelina (?)1 b. 1885
     Rose married (?) George.1 Rose Vico, daughter of John Vico and Angelina (?), was born in 1910 in California.2
She lived with her parents, Angelina and John, in 1930 at 1414 Frames Street, Crockett, Contra Costa County, California.2
Rose was packing sugar in a sugar refinery in 1930 at Contra Costa County, California.2

Family

(?) George

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S8922] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Vico household.

(?) George1

M, #4097
     (?) married Rose Vico, daughter of John Vico and Angelina (?).1

Family

Rose Vico b. 1910

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

Silvio Pete Vico1

M, #4098, b. 1912
Father*John Vico1 b. 1879
Mother*Angelina (?)1 b. 1885
     Silvio Pete Vico, son of John Vico and Angelina (?), was born in 1912 in California.2
He lived with his parents, Angelina and John, in 1930 at 1414 Frames Street in Crockett, Contra Costa County, California.2
Silvio Pete was a salesman in a dry goods store in 1930 at Contra Costa County, California.2

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S8922] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Vico household.

Virginia Vico1

F, #4099
Father*John Vico1 b. 1879
Mother*Angelina (?)1 b. 1885
     Virginia married (?) Bonnini.1

Family

(?) Bonnini

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

(?) Bonnini1

M, #4100
     (?) married Virginia Vico, daughter of John Vico and Angelina (?).1

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

Josephine Vico1

F, #4101
Father*John Vico1 b. 1879
Mother*Angelina (?)1 b. 1885

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

Virginia Viar1

F, #4102
      Virginiamarried, an unknown person (his first marriage) Wirt Edward Knapp Jr. (his second marriage) , son of Wirt Edward Knapp and Rowina Fay Harris, circa 1930.1,2

Family

Wirt Edward Knapp Jr. b. February 16, 1906, d. September 13, 1972

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S1528] Obituary of Wirt Edward Knapp Jr.

Marie Faye Knapp1

F, #4103
Father*Wirt Edward Knapp Jr.1 b. February 16, 1906, d. September 13, 1972
Mother*Molka "Marie" Frieberger1 b. 1907, d. February 20, 1986
     Marie (her first marriage) marrried William F. Dickson (his first marriage) on May 8, 1943 at Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas.1,2
Marie (her second marriage) married John Navigato in 1977 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.2

Family 2

John Navigato

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S1085] Alfred Averill Knapp, The Genealogy of the Descendants of Nicholas Knapp.

William F. Dickson1

M, #4104
     William (his first marriage) married Marie Faye Knapp (her first marriage), daughter of Wirt Edward Knapp Jr. and Molka "Marie" Frieberger, on May 8, 1943 at Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas.1,2

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S1085] Alfred Averill Knapp, The Genealogy of the Descendants of Nicholas Knapp.

Alfred Sellenriek1

M, #4105
      Alfred married Mary Jane Knapp (her second marriage), daughter of Wirt Edward Knapp and Hazel Sibothan, circa 1960.1,2,3

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S1741] David Berg e-mail to Robert Berg, January 18, 2001.
  3. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Alexander H. Lueken1,2

M, #4106, b. September 29, 1900, d. September 1, 1973
     Alexander H. Lueken was born on September 29, 1900.2
Alexander married Gertrude A. Carney (her second marriage), daughter of John Patrick "Pat" Carney and Nora Ignatia Brennan, before 1942.1,3
Alexander died on September 1, 1973 at age 72.4
Alexander and Gertrude Carney Leuken Tombstone

Family

Gertrude A. Carney b. April 21, 1902, d. October 21, 1985

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S556] Internet Site: 2Find-A-Grave Web Site).
  3. [S6948] St. Louis Post Dispatch "John P. Carney Obituary", July 27, 1942, page 18.
  4. [S556] Internet Site: Find-A-Grave Web Site).

Samuel P. Laumand1

M, #4107, b. 1851, d. before 1920
     Samuel P. Laumand was also known as Soren.2
Samuel P. Laumand and Christian P. Laumand may have been related. Possibly were brothers although Christian immigrated in 1900 and Samuel in 1892. Samuel P. Laumand was born in 1851 in Denmark.1
Samuel married (?) (?) circa 1875.1
Samuel married Mary (?) Howe in 1886.1
Samuel P. Laumand immigrated in 1892 from Denmark. Date may be incorrect, not real legible on census and his wife, Mary, is shown is immigrating in 1882.1
Samuel P. was a laborer for a home builder in 1910.1
Mary and Samuel P. Laumand lived in 1910 at 646 Marshall Avenue in Webster Groves, St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Robert, George, William, James and Mable..1
Samuel is a head of household on the 1910 U. S. Census of St. Louis, Missouri. He was identified as a 69-year-old man born in Denmark as were his parents; he owned a home which was mortgaged. Enumerated with him were: his wife Mary, his sons Robert Johnson, George Peter, William and James, his daughter Mable C.1
Samuel died before 1920.3

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1910St. Louis, MissouriSamuel P. Laumand1

Family 1

Child

Family 2

(?) (?)
Children

Family 3

Mary (?) Howe b. 1861
Children

Citations

  1. [S3510] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Samuel P. Laumand household.
  2. [S5323] William Laumand Death Certificate.
  3. [S3512] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Mary Laumond household.
  4. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.

Lawrence Roseman1

M, #4108
Father*Otto Henry Roseman1 b. March 24, 1886, d. October, 1970
Mother*Anna Katherine Schmitz1 b. 1886

Citations

  1. [S3636] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Otto H. Rosemann household.

William Harold Van Horn1,2

M, #4109, b. January, 1897
Father*Amos Andrew Van Horn2 b. April 20, 1870, d. April 10, 1919
Mother*Bertha White2 b. 1877
     William Harold Van Horn, son of Amos Andrew Van Horn and Bertha White, was born in January, 1897 in Richmond, Decatur County, Indiana.1,3,4
He lived with his parents, Bertha and Amos, in 1900 at 174 Nineteenth Street in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio.3
William was enumerated as the son of Amos Andrew Van Horn under the name of "Harrod Van Horn" on the 1900 U. S. Census of Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio. He was listed as a three-year-old boy born in Ohio, his father was born in Iowa and his mother in Indiana.5
William married Florence Cecellia Scott in 1919.1
William Harold was a chauffeur for a laundry company in 1930.1
Florence and William Harold Van Horn lived in 1930 at 4227 Oakwood Avenue in Pine Lawn, St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were..1
William is a head of household on the 1930 U. S. Census of Central Township, Pine Lawn, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was identified as a 33-year-old man born in Indiana as was his mother, his father was born in Ohio. He had been married since the age of 22 and was not a veteran. Enumerated with him were: his wife Florence Cecellia.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1900Columbus, Franklin County, OhioAmos Andrew Van Horn5
1930Central Township, Pine Lawn, St. Louis County, MissouriWilliam Harold Van Horn1

Family

Florence Cecellia Scott b. 1899

Citations

  1. [S3637] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), William Van Horn household.
  2. [S3623] Family Tree titled "Ancestry - One World Tree Project," Ancestry World Tree.
  3. [S3641] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Walter Van Horn household.
  4. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  5. [S3639] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), A. A. Van Horn household.

Clara K. Laumand1

F, #4110, b. 1895, d. November, 1982
Father*Samuel P. Laumand1 b. 1851, d. before 1920
Mother*Mary (?) Howe2 b. 1861
     Clara K. Laumand, daughter of Samuel P. Laumand and Mary (?) Howe, was born in 1895 in Missouri.3 Conflicting evidence placed her birth on January 9, 1892 (Social Security Death Index.)4
Clara and George Frederic Heege lived in 1917 at 309 Heege Avenue in Kirkwood, St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were, their child, Maurine..5
Clara married George Frederic Heege, son of Frederick Heege and Rose Schumacher, in 1917.1
Clara and George Frederic Heege lived in 1920 at 311 Heege Avenue in Kirkwood, St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Maurine, Constance and Shirley..3
Clara was enumerated as the wife of George Frederic Heege under the name of "Clara Heege" on the 1920 U. S. Census of Bonhomme Township, Kirkwood, St. Louis County, Missouri. She was listed as a married 25-year-old woman born in Missouri, her parents were born in Germany. She was able to read, write and speak English.3
Clara and George Frederic Heege lived in 1930 at 239 West Way Avenue in Kirkwood, St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Constance, Maurine, Shirley and George..6
Clara was enumerated as the wife of George Frederic Heege under the name of "Clara Heege" on the 1930 U. S. Census of Bonhomme Township, Missouri. She was listed as a married 37-year-old woman born in Missouri, her parents were born in Germany. She was able to read and write. She was married for the first time at the age of 24.6 At the time of her death the location for mailing benefits was reported as St. Louis, Missouri by the Social Security Administration.4
Clara died in November, 1982.4

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1920Bonhomme Township, Kirkwood, St. Louis County, MissouriGeorge Frederic Heege3
1930Bonhomme Township, MissouriGeorge Frederic Heege6

Family

George Frederic Heege b. June 15, 1891, d. March, 1983
Children

Citations

  1. [S463] Research Papers, Berg, Blume and Schoettle Families. Prepared by Dorothea Berg Hoemann.
  2. [S3510] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Samuel P. Laumand household.
  3. [S3484] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), George Heege household.
  4. [S358] Social Security Death Index, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.
  5. [S4125] Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Ancestry.com (database online), 2002.
  6. [S3485] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), George F. Heege household.