Lillian H. Hayward1

F, #14251
     Lillian H. Hayward was also known as Haeward.1
Lillian married Francis W. Boggs, son of George W. Boggs and Alabama McMeans, circa 1895.1

Family

Francis W. Boggs b. circa 1870, d. October 27, 1911
Child

Citations

  1. [S1819] Rootsweb Message Boards.

Edwin Boggs1

M, #14252, b. circa 1897
Father*Francis W. Boggs1 b. circa 1870, d. October 27, 1911
Mother*Lillian H. Hayward1
     Edwin Boggs, son of Francis W. Boggs and Lillian H. Hayward, was born circa 1897.1

Citations

  1. [S1819] Rootsweb Message Boards.

Elizabeth Boggs1

F, #14253, b. circa 1790
Father*John McKinley Boggs1 b. circa 1758, d. April 5, 1847
Mother*Martha Oliver1 b. circa 1770
     Elizabeth Boggs, daughter of John McKinley Boggs and Martha Oliver, was born circa 1790 in Pennsylvania.1
Elizabeth married John McDaniel on October 14, 1813 at Gallia County, Ohio.1

Family

John McDaniel b. circa 1789, d. before October, 1859

Citations

  1. [S1998] D. Frank Beard, October 5, 2001.

John McDaniel1

M, #14254, b. circa 1789, d. before October, 1859
     John McDaniel was born circa 1789 in Orange County, South Carolina.1
John married Elizabeth Boggs, daughter of John McKinley Boggs and Martha Oliver, on October 14, 1813 at Gallia County, Ohio.1
John died before October, 1859 in Ray County, Missouri.1

Family

Elizabeth Boggs b. circa 1790

Citations

  1. [S1998] D. Frank Beard, October 5, 2001.

James Coleman Boggs1

M, #14255, b. May 18, 1810, d. February 17, 1854
Father*John McKinley Boggs1 b. circa 1758, d. April 5, 1847
Mother*Martha Oliver1 b. circa 1770
     James Coleman Boggs, son of John McKinley Boggs and Martha Oliver, was born on May 18, 1810 in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky.1
James married Elizabeth Margaret Pegus circa 1835 at Kentucky.1
James died on February 17, 1854 in Leona, Leon County, Texas, at age 43.1

Family

Elizabeth Margaret Pegus b. circa 1815

Citations

  1. [S1998] D. Frank Beard, October 5, 2001.

Thomas Jefferson Boggs1

M, #14256, b. circa 1812
Father*John McKinley Boggs1 b. circa 1758, d. April 5, 1847
Mother*Martha Oliver1 b. circa 1770
     Thomas Jefferson Boggs, son of John McKinley Boggs and Martha Oliver, was born circa 1812 in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky.1
Thomas married Sopia Barnes circa 1834 at Kentucky.1

Family

Sopia Barnes

Citations

  1. [S1998] D. Frank Beard, October 5, 2001.

Joseph Oliver Boggs1

M, #14257, b. circa 1814
Father*John McKinley Boggs1 b. circa 1758, d. April 5, 1847
Mother*Martha Oliver1 b. circa 1770
     Joseph Oliver Boggs, son of John McKinley Boggs and Martha Oliver, was born circa 1814 in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky.1

Citations

  1. [S1998] D. Frank Beard, October 5, 2001.

Sopia Barnes1

F, #14258
     Sopia married Thomas Jefferson Boggs, son of John McKinley Boggs and Martha Oliver, circa 1834 at Kentucky.1

Family

Thomas Jefferson Boggs b. circa 1812

Citations

  1. [S1998] D. Frank Beard, October 5, 2001.

Elizabeth Margaret Pegus1

F, #14259, b. circa 1815
     Elizabeth Margaret Pegus was born circa 1815 in Fayette County, Kentucky.1
Elizabeth married James Coleman Boggs, son of John McKinley Boggs and Martha Oliver, circa 1835 at Kentucky.1

Family

James Coleman Boggs b. May 18, 1810, d. February 17, 1854

Citations

  1. [S1998] D. Frank Beard, October 5, 2001.

Robert Scott Swift1

M, #14260
Father*Robert Swift2
Mother*Linda (?)2
     Scott Swift and Julie Ann Berg were engaged on June 1, 2001 at St. Charles, St. Charles County, Missouri.1
Scott married Julie Ann Berg, daughter of Robert Henry Berg and Linda Ann Frank, on December 22, 2001 at St. Joseph Catholic Church, Cottleville, St. Charles County, Missouri. The marriage ceremony was performed by Reverend Larry Huber.2,3

Citations

  1. [S1484] Personal knowledge of compiler.
  2. [S2105] Program for the wedding of Scott Swift and Julie Berg.
  3. [S2125] Invitation to Scott Swift and Julie Ann Berg wedding.

Maria Ignacia Jaramillo1

F, #14261, b. circa 1825
Father*Don Francisco Jaramillo1 b. circa 1756
     Maria Ignacia Jaramillo, daughter of Don Francisco Jaramillo, was born circa 1825.

Family

Thomas Oliver Boggs b. August 22, 1824
Children

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Don Francisco Jaramillo1

M, #14262, b. circa 1756
     Francisco married Maria Apalonia Vigil.2 Don Francisco Jaramillo was born circa 1756.1

Family 1

Children

Family 2

Maria Apalonia Vigil
Child

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
  2. [S2000] Stephen Chinn, October 8, 2001.

Maria Josefa Jaramillo1

F, #14263, b. March 19, 1828, d. April 23, 1868
Father*Don Francisco Jaramillo1 b. circa 1756
Mother*Maria Apalonia Vigil2
Maria Josefa Jarmillo Carson
     Maria Josefa Jaramillo, daughter of Don Francisco Jaramillo and Maria Apalonia Vigil, was born on March 19, 1828 in Santa Fe, Sante Fe County, New Mexico.1,2
Mariamarried, an unknown person (his first marriage) Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson (his third marriage) , son of Lindsey Carson and Rebecca Robertson, on February 6, 1843 at Guadalupe Church, Taos, Taos County, New Mexico.1,2,3
Maria and Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson lived in 1850 in Taos County, Northern Division, New Mexico Territory. Residing with them was their child, Charles.4
Kit Carson's home in Taos
Josefa and Christopher Carson Junior

Maria and Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson lived in 1860 in La Placita de los Lucsros, Taos County, New Mexico Territory. Residing with them were, their children William, Teresina, Christopher and Juano..5
Boggsville home where Kit and Josefa lived at the time of her death during childbirth

Maria died on April 23, 1868 in Boggsville, Bent County, Colorado, at age 40.2 She was buried in Colorado.2 She was buried in 1869 in Kit Carson Cemetery in Taos, Taos County, New Mexico, moved along with her husband, Kit Carson.6,77
Maria Josefa Jarmillo Carson Tombstone

Family

Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson b. December 24, 1809, d. May 23, 1868
Children

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
  2. [S2000] Stephen Chinn, October 8, 2001.
  3. [S4509] U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1850-1900, Ancestry.com (database online), 2004.
  4. [S8953] 1850 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Christopher Carson household.
  5. [S8954] 1860 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Christopher Carson household.
  6. [S2007] Internet Site: Cristopher 'Kit' Carson's Grave).
  7. [S556] Internet Site: Find-A-Grave Web Site).

Pablo Jaramillo1

M, #14264, b. circa 1825
Father*Don Francisco Jaramillo1 b. circa 1756
     Pablo Jaramillo, son of Don Francisco Jaramillo, was born circa 1825.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson1,2

M, #14265, b. December 24, 1809, d. May 23, 1868
Father*Lindsey Carson2 b. August 1, 1754, d. September 4, 1818
Mother*Rebecca Robertson2 b. from 1759 to 1797
Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson
Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson
Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson
Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson
Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson
Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson
     Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson was short, of solid stature with a steadfast character. He weighed about 115 pounds, was 5'8" tall with gray blue eyes and light sandy hair. His voice was said to be "as soft and gentle as a woman's."3 His nickname was "Kit." Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson, son of Lindsey Carson and Rebecca Robertson, was born on December 24, 1809 in Madison County, Kentucky, in a cabin of hand hewed logs on a hill in a modest wooded area.1,2,3,4
Christopher moved along with Lindsey Carson and Rebecca Robertson in 1811 to Boonslick, Old Franklin, Howard County, Missouri.5
Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson After his father's death Kit was apprenticed to a saddle and harness maker but ran away from home, joining with a caravan of traders bound for Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1826.5,6
Kit Carson

Kit Carson’s father had come to Kentucky from South Carolina, and the boy who would in time become one of the most famous of the Mountain Men, was born on Dec. 24, 1809, in Madison County. Kentucky, Kit was the smallest boy in the family. He never topped five feet six inches. Despite his size, he early learned wilderness ways. He stood guard against Indian attacks, and he was an expert shot with a rifle. When he was eight, he could shoot a squirrel at 50 yards, he could neither read, nor write when in his early years. he was the ninth of 14 children. When Kit was about a year and a half old, the family moved to Missouri (then part of the Louisiana Territory). They settled in Boone’s Lick district, which later became Howard County. At that time Indian raids happened often.
When Kit was nine, a falling tree limb killed his father. When he was 15, his mother apprenticed him to a saddler and harness maker in the nearby town of Franklin. Kit didn't like being kept indoors over a saddler’s bench. He missed the hunting and the wooded land along the Missouri River. From hunters and wagon drivers who stopped by the shop he heard tales of dangerous adventure. These men traveled with the great wagon trains that carried goods over the Santa Fe Trail. After a year Kit could stand confinement no more, so he ran away. He asked a wagon boss for a job and was laughed at. Kit kept begging, and finally they made him a cavy boy, one who drove the spare mules and oxen.

Although accustomed to outdoor life, Kit had to endure greater hardship than he had ever known. As the wagon trains pushed slowly forward through desert dust, Kit suffered extreme thirst. The wagon trains kept moving all day long, and at night the men shared watches. On one occasion Kit helped amputate the shattered arm of an injured man. Kit grew lean and strong, and he began to love the new life. From Santa Fe, he went to Taos. He worked as a cook and errand boy and helped repair harnesses and other leather articles. Then Carson traveled back to his home state of Missouri where he had met with another great American Mountain Man explorer, Captain Isaac Graham and other mountain men. However, after three years, In 1829, Ewing Young, a pioneer trapper, hired him for his trapping expedition to California.

Kit returned to Taos in 1831, and was then hired by Thomas Fitzpatrick to trap in the north mountains. When the Blackfeet attacked him and his men at Fort Robidou his shoulder was shattered by a bullet. Kit later became the chief hunter for Bent's Fort in Colorado. In charge of keeping the fort supplied with meat. In 1836 he married an Arapaho. They had one child, Adaline. Kit's wife died, he took his daughter east to Missouri and left her to be educated.

Kit then met the man that would bring him everlasting fame, John Charles Fremont. Fremont was ordered the job of mapping the Western trails. He had previously heard of Kit Carson from other mountain men, and so hired him as his guide for his first expedition that lasted from June to October, 1842. After the expedition, Kit then returned to Taos, and in 1843, married a beautiful Mexican girl named Maria Josefa Jaramillo. Later that same year, Kit joined Fremont's second expedition at the Arkansas River. He led the party across the Sierra Nevada mountain range during the height of winter.

In 1845 Kit and John Fremont departed on their third expedition. They left Bent's Fort on August 26, and when they reached California word came that the United States was at war with Mexico. After they captured of Los Angeles, John Fremont appointed Kit as a lieutenant and sent him to Washington D.C. with dispatches to than President Polk. In March, of 1847, Kit was again sent to Washington D.C. with dispatches. With a small party he crossed the continent in only three months. There, Carson was proclaimed a hero.. Kit then returned to California, and once again was sent back to Washington D.C. with important dispatches. While In Santa Fe he learned that the Senate had voted down his commission as lieutenant. Kit completed his mission to Washington and then returned to Taos.

After the American Civil War broke out, Kit resigned as an Indian agent and co-organized the 1st New Mexican Volunteer Infantry Regiment of the Union Army. Kit's force was first put up against Apaches and Navajos, and than later against the Comanches and Kiowas. In 1865 he was made a brigadier general and in 1866, he took command of Fort Garland in western Colorado. However, bad health forced him to resign the following year. In 1868 the Carson family moved to Boggsville, Colorado. Kit was still very sick, but he went to Washington with a group of Utes to help plead their case before a commission. While there he visited doctors in New York and Boston, but they were unable to help him regain his health. Kit returned home to Colorado. And it was there that his wife died on April 23, 1868.

Kit was taken to Fort Lyons for care. It was there where he died on May 23, 1868. The Carson's had seven children. ….7
Kit Carson was born the 9th of 14 children on Christmas Eve, 1809, in Madison County, Kentucky. During his long and illustrious career ranging throughout the Desert Southwest, he was a trapper, guide, military scout, Indian agent, soldier, rancher and authentic legend.

Kit spent most of his boyhood in the Boone's Lick district of Missouri (then part of the Louisiana Territory), which later became Howard County. His father was killed by a falling tree limb when Kit was only 9 years old, and the need to work prevented him from receiving an education. He was apprenticed to a saddle- and harness-maker when he turned 14, but grew restless after a year and left home in 1826 with a wagon train heading west to Santa Fe.

From Santa Fe, Kit went north to Taos where he worked as a cook, errand boy and harness repairer. When he was 19, he was hired for a fur trapping expedition to California, where, in spite of his small stature (he never exceeded 5 and a half feet) he soon proved himself able and courageous. Between 1828 and 1840, Carson used Taos as a base camp for many fur-trapping expeditions throughout the mountains of the West, from California's Sierra Nevadas to the Colorado Rockies.

Like other white trappers, Carson traveled and lived extensively among Indians. His first two wives were Arapaho and Cheyenne, one of whom bore a daughter in 1836 and died shortly thereafter. But unlike other trappers, he gained renown for his honesty, courage and unassuming manner. According to one acquaintance, his "word was as sure as the sun comin' up."

In about 1840, he became employed by William Bent as chief hunter for Bent's Fort in Colorado, where his job was to keep the fort supplied with meat. In 1842, while returning from Missouri, where he took his daughter to be educated in a convent, Carson happened to meet John C. Fremont on a Missouri Riverboat. Fremont hired Carson as guide for his1st expedition to map and describe Western trails to the Pacific Ocean. After returning to Taos from California in 1843, Carson married his third wife, Maria Josefa Jaramillothen.

Over the next few years, Carson's service guiding Fremont across the deserts and mountains of the American West -- documented in Fremont's widely-read reports of his expeditions -- made Kit Carson a national hero.

Carson was still serving as Fremont's guide when Fremont joined California's short-lived Bear-Flag Rebellion, just before the outbreak of the Mexican-American War in 1846. Carson also led the forces of U.S. General Stephen Kearney from Socorro, New Mexico into California, when a Californio band led by Andrés Pico mounted a challenge to American occupation of Los Angeles later that year.

On Dec. 6, 1846, these forces were attacked by Mexicans at San Pasqual, about 30 miles north of San Diego. On the third night of this battle, Carson and two others snuck through enemy lines and ran the entire distance to San Diego, where they brought help for Kearny's pinned-down forces.

Carson spent the next few years carrying dispatches to President James Polk Washington, DC. At the end of the war, he returned to Taos and took up ranching. In 1853, he and his Mexican herders drove 6,500 sheep to Sacramento, fetching high prices because of the California Gold Rush.

In 1854 he was appointed Indian agent at Taos for two tribes of Utes -- a post he held with distinction until 1861 -- and occasionally served the Army as a scout in clashes with warring Apaches.

When the Civil War broke out, Carson resigned as Indian agent and helped organize the 1st New Mexican Volunteer Infantry of the Union Army, which saw action at Valverde in 1862. He was elected a lieutenant colonel and later rose to colonel. It was during his Civil War service when he finally learned to read and write.

Most of Carson's military actions were directed against the Navajo, who had refused to be confined on a distant reservation. In 1863, Carson initiated a brutal economic campaign, marching through Navajo territory destroying crops, orchards and livestock. Other tribes, who for centuries had suffered at the hands of the Navajo, took up arms and joined Carson. After surrendering in 1864, 8,000 Navajo men, women and children were forced to take what came to be called the "Long Walk" of 300 miles from Arizona to Fort Sumner, New Mexico, where they suffered in confinement until 1868.

In 1865 Carson was given a commission as brigadier general and cited for gallantry and distinguished service. In the summer of 1866, he moved to Colorado to expand his ranching business and took command of Fort Garland. Ill health forced him to resign the following year, and in 1868 the family moved to Boggsville, near present-day La Junta, Colorado. He died in nearby Fort Lyons on May 23, 1868. The following year, his remains were moved to a small cemetery near his old home in Taos.6
From Santa Fe, Kit went north to Taos where he worked as a cook, errand boy and harness repairer. When he was 19, he hired for a fur trapping expedition to California. Between 1828 and 1840, Carson used Taos as a base camp for many trapping expeditions throughout the mountains of the West.6
Christopher Houston Carson was born on Christmas Eve in the year 1809 in Madison County, KY. His family moved to Boon's Lick, MO and he spent most of his childhood there.

He shortened his name to Kit when he was still young. When he was fifteen years old he ran away from the harness-maker to whom he had been apprenticed.

He went to Taos in 1826 when he was sixteen years old. He worked as a cook and teamster until 1829 when he finally attained the rank of trapper.

In 1829 he left with Ewing Young's trapping expedition for California. They were plagued with bad luck to and from California. They trapped very few beavers and many of their horses and mules drowned crossing the Rio Grande river.

The next expedition in which Kit Carson was involved was with Thomas Fitzpatrick of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company. He was a guide for John Fremont in 1842, in 1843-1844 and again in 1846.

In 1843 Kit Carson married Maria Josefa Jaramillo and they had a child named Alice. Josefina was fifteen years old.

As for the mountain man's clothing "buckskin breeches, a blanket Capote, and a beaver skin cap makes up our rig," said mountain man Joe Meek.

Kit Carson had eight children. Seven survived infancy.

In 1861, Kit was made colonel of the N.M. Volunteer Regiment. At Valverde, NM, in 1862, he fought the Confederate Forces.

Kit gathered about 400 Apaches and placed them on a reservation near Fort Summer, NM, in 1862.

Kit was in charge of another campaign against the Navajo Indians. He forced about 8,000 Navajos to accept reservation life.

Kit took command of Fort Garlands, CO, in 1866 and he was made Brigadier General in 1865. He was one of eight men who raised the Union flag in New Mexico when he was head of the third New Mexico regiment.

Carson chased many southwest Indians. He chased Kiowas, Commanches, Plains Indians, Mescalero and White Mountain Apache.

Carson retired at the ripe old age of 58. His only assets were a $3,000 note from Lucien Maxwell and a $7,900 estate. He died May 23, 1868.8
Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson Bent's Fort (Fort Wiliam), a fur trading ost on the upper Arkansas river was established. in 1834 at Bent's Fort (Fort William), New Mexico.5
Christopher (his first marriage) married Waa-Nibe in 1835.1,2 His wife, Waa-Nibe, died in 1838.2
Christopher (his second marriage) married Making-Out-Road in 1840.2
     When her tribe migrated, Making-Out-Road walked off and left Kit circa 1842.2
Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson Bent, St. Vrain and Company's wagon train reached Missouri after an April to early May journey across "Kansas" on the Santa Fe trail, from Bent's Fort on the upper Arkansas River. Kit Carson was with Charles Bent on this trip and brought with him his young half-Arapaho daughter, Adaline, to be cared for and educated in Missouri in 1842.5
Christopher (his third marriage) married Maria Josefa Jaramillo, daughter of Don Francisco Jaramillo and Maria Apalonia Vigil, on February 6, 1843 at Guadalupe Church, Taos, Taos County, New Mexico.1,2,9
Christopher Houston was a farmer in 1850 at Taos County, New Mexico Territory.10
Maria and Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson lived in 1850 in Taos County, Northern Division, New Mexico Territory. Residing with them was their child, Charles.10
Kit Carson's home in Taos

Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson Kit Carson who had left Rayado, New Mexico on March 17 arrived at Kansas City, Missouri, by way of Bent's Fort. His account stated: " I remained in Rayado till March and then started for St. Louis, took with me twelve wagons of Mr. Maxwell for the purpose of bringing out goods for him..." on May 1, 1851.5
He left Kansas city, Missouri early in June 1951 with 12 of Lucien Maxwell's wagons filled with goods, bound for Santa Fe. The company consisted of Carson, his daughter, Adaline, his niece, Susan (wife of Jesse Nelson), and 15 employees (Jesse Nelson, a French-Canadian and 13 Mexicans.)5
Christopher Houston was an indian agent in 1860 at New Mexico Territory.11
Maria and Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson lived in 1860 in La Placita de los Lucsros, Taos County, New Mexico Territory. Residing with them were, their children William, Teresina, Christopher and Juano..11 Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel in the first New Mexico volunteer infantry on July 25, 1861.3 He was promoted to Colonel in New Mexico volunteer infantry on September 20, 1861.3
Christopher served on February 21, 1862 in the Battle of Valverde, stationed at New Mexico.3
Map of Valverde

     Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson fought against the Mescalero Apaches and the Navajos circa 1863.3
     Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson fought against the Kiowas and Comanches in 1864.3
Indian Affairs. Laws and Treaties. Vol. II.

In testimony whereof, the said Commissioners as aforesaid, and the undersigned chiefs and headmen of the confederated tribes of the Arrapahoes and Cheyennes of the Upper Arkansas, have hereunto set their hands and seals, at the place and on the day and year first hereinbefore written.
John B. Sanborn,
Wm. S. Harney,
Thos. Murphy,
Kit Carson,
Wm. W. Bent,
J. H. Leavenworth,
James Steele,
Commissioners on the part of the United States.
Moke-ta-ve-to, or Black Kettle, head chief, his x mark,
Oh-to-ah-ne-so-to-wheo, or Seven Bulls, chief, his x mark,
Hark-kah-o-me, or Little Robe, chief, his x mark,
Moke-tah-vo-ve-ho, or Black White Man, chief, his x mark,
Mun-a-men-ek, or Eagle's Head, headman, his x mark,
O-to-ah-nis-to, or Bull that Hears, headman, his x mark,
On the part of the Cheyennes.
Oh-has-tee, or Little Raven, headchief, his x mark,
Oh-hah-mah-hah, or Storm, chief, his x mark,
Pah-uf-pah-top, or Big Mouth, chief, his x mark,
Ah-cra-kah-tau-nah, or Spotted Wolf, chief, his x mark,
Ah-nah-wat-tan, or Black Man, headman, his x mark,
Nah-a-nah-cha, or Chief in Everything, headman, his x mark,
Chi-e-nuk, or Haversack, headman, his x mark,
On the part of the Arrapahoes.
Signed and sealed in the presence of—
John S. Smith, United States interpreter.
E. W. Wynkoop,
W. R. Irwin,
Bon. H. Van Havre,
O. T. Atwood, secretaries.
J. E. Badger,
S. A. Kingman,W.W. Rich.
D. C. McNeil,

N.B.—The Apache tribe was brought into the provisions of the above treaty by the second article of the treaty with the Apaches, Cheyennes and Arrapahoes, proclaimed May 26, 1866.

TREATY WITH THE APACHE, CHEYENNE, AND ARAPAHO (1865, Oct. 17)
14 Stat., 713.
Ratified May 22, 1866.
Proclaimed May 26, 1866.

Whereas a treaty was made and concluded, by and between the undersigned commissioners on the part of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs and head-men of the Cheyenne and Arrapahoe tribes of Indians, on the part of said tribes, on the fourteenth day of October, A. D. 1865, at the council-grounds on the Little Arkansas River, in the State of Kansas; and, whereas, the Apache Indians, who have been heretofore confederated with the Kiowa and Comanche tribes of Indians, are desirous of dissolving said confederation and uniting their fortunes with the said Cheyennes and Arrapahoes; and whereas the said last-named tribes are willing to receive among themselves on an equal footing with the members of their own tribes, the said Apache Indians; and the United States, by their said commissioners, having given their assent thereto; it is therefore hereby agreed by and between the United States, by their said commissioners, and the said Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache Indians, by the undersigned chiefs and head-men of said tribes respectively, as follows, viz:

ARTICLE 1. The said Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache tribes, henceforth shall be and they are hereby united, and the United States will hereafter recognize said tribes as the confederated bands or tribes of Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache Indians.

ARTICLE 2. The several terms, stipulations and agreements to be done and performed on the part of the United States for and with the said Cheyenne and Arrapahoe tribes of Indians, and by the said Cheyenne <892> and Arrapahoe tribes of Indians, for and with the United States, by the provisions of said treaty of October 14th, A. D. 1865, shall be done and performed by the United States for and on behalf of the said confederated tribes or bands of Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache Indians, and on their part shall be done, observed and performed to, with and for the United States in the same manner, to the same extent, and for like objects, to all intents and purposes, as would have been the case had said treaty been originally made and executed with the said confederated tribes of Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache Indians.

In testimony whereof, the undersigned, Commissioners on the part of the United states, and the chiefs and headmen of said tribes, have hereunto set their hands and seals at the council-ground on the Little Arkansas, in the State of Kansas, this 17th day of October, A. D. 1865.
John B. Sanborn,
Wm. S. Harney,
James Steele,
Wm. W. Bent,
Kit Carson,
Thos. Murphy,
J. H. Leavenworth,
Commissioners on the part of the United States.
Kou-zhon-ta-co, or Poor Bear, head chief, his x mark.,
Ba-zhe-ech, or Iron Shirt, his x mark.,
Az-che-om-a-te-ne, or the Old Fool Man, chief, his x mark.,
Karn-tin-ta, or The Crow, chief, his x mark.,
Mah-vip-pah, or The Wolf Sleeve, chief, his x mark.,
Nahn-tan, or The Chief, his x mark.,
On the part of the Apaches.
Moke-ta-ve-to, or Black Kettle, head chief, his x mark.,
Oh-to-ah-ne-so-to-wheo, or Seven Bulls, chief, his x mark.,
Hark-kah-o-me, or Little Robe, chief, his x mark.,
Moke-tah-vo-ve-ho, or Black White Man, chief, his x mark. ,
Mun-a-men-ek, or Eagle's Head, headman, his x mark.,
O-to-ah-nis-to, or Bull that Hears, headman, his x mark.,
On the part of the Cheyennes.
Oh-has-tee, or Little Raven, head chief, his x mark.,
Oh-hah-mah-hah, or Storm, chief, his x mark.,
Pah-uf-pah-top, or Big Mouth, chief, his x mark.,
Ah-cra-ka-tau-nah, or Spotted Wolf, chief, his x mark.,
Ah-nah-wat-tan, or Black Man, headman, his x mark.,
Nah-a-nah-cha, Chief in Everything, headman, his x mark.,
Chi-e-nuk, or Haversack, headthan, his x mark.,
On the part of the Arrapahoes.
Signed and sealed in presence of—
W. R. Irwin, Secretary.
D.C. McNeil.
12
Indian Affairs. Laws and Treaties. Vol. II.
In testimony whereof, the said Commissioners as aforesaid, and the undersigned chiefs and headmen of the confederated tribes of the Arrapahoes and Cheyennes of the Upper Arkansas, have hereunto set their hands and seals, at the place and on the day and year first hereinbefore written.
John B. Sanborn,
Wm. S. Harney,
Thos. Murphy,
Kit Carson,
Wm. W. Bent,
J. H. Leavenworth,
James Steele,
Commissioners on the part of the United States.
Moke-ta-ve-to, or Black Kettle, head chief, his x mark,
Oh-to-ah-ne-so-to-wheo, or Seven Bulls, chief, his x mark,
Hark-kah-o-me, or Little Robe, chief, his x mark,
Moke-tah-vo-ve-ho, or Black White Man, chief, his x mark,
Mun-a-men-ek, or Eagle's Head, headman, his x mark,
O-to-ah-nis-to, or Bull that Hears, headman, his x mark,
On the part of the Cheyennes.
Oh-has-tee, or Little Raven, headchief, his x mark,
Oh-hah-mah-hah, or Storm, chief, his x mark,
Pah-uf-pah-top, or Big Mouth, chief, his x mark,
Ah-cra-kah-tau-nah, or Spotted Wolf, chief, his x mark,
Ah-nah-wat-tan, or Black Man, headman, his x mark,
Nah-a-nah-cha, or Chief in Everything, headman, his x mark,
Chi-e-nuk, or Haversack, headman, his x mark,
On the part of the Arrapahoes.
Signed and sealed in the presence of—
John S. Smith, United States interpreter.
E. W. Wynkoop,
W. R. Irwin,
Bon. H. Van Havre,
O. T. Atwood, secretaries.
J. E. Badger,
S. A. Kingman,W.W. Rich.
D. C. McNeil,

N.B.—The Apache tribe was brought into the provisions of the above treaty by the second article of the treaty with the Apaches, Cheyennes and Arrapahoes, proclaimed May 26, 1866.

TREATY WITH THE APACHE, CHEYENNE, AND ARAPAHO (1865, Oct. 17)
14 Stat., 713.
Ratified May 22, 1866.
Proclaimed May 26, 1866.
Whereas a treaty was made and concluded, by and between the undersigned commissioners on the part of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs and head-men of the Cheyenne and Arrapahoe tribes of Indians, on the part of said tribes, on the fourteenth day of October, A. D. 1865, at the council-grounds on the Little Arkansas River, in the State of Kansas; and, whereas, the Apache Indians, who have been heretofore confederated with the Kiowa and Comanche tribes of Indians, are desirous of dissolving said confederation and uniting their fortunes with the said Cheyennes and Arrapahoes; and whereas the said last-named tribes are willing to receive among themselves on an equal footing with the members of their own tribes, the said Apache Indians; and the United States, by their said commissioners, having given their assent thereto; it is therefore hereby agreed by and between the United States, by their said commissioners, and the said Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache Indians, by the undersigned chiefs and head-men of said tribes respectively, as follows, viz:
ARTICLE 1. The said Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache tribes, henceforth shall be and they are hereby united, and the United States will hereafter recognize said tribes as the confederated bands or tribes of Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache Indians.
ARTICLE 2. The several terms, stipulations and agreements to be done and performed on the part of the United States for and with the said Cheyenne and Arrapahoe tribes of Indians, and by the said Cheyenne <892> and Arrapahoe tribes of Indians, for and with the United States, by the provisions of said treaty of October 14th, A. D. 1865, shall be done and performed by the United States for and on behalf of the said confederated tribes or bands of Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache Indians, and on their part shall be done, observed and performed to, with and for the United States in the same manner, to the same extent, and for like objects, to all intents and purposes, as would have been the case had said treaty been originally made and executed with the said confederated tribes of Cheyenne, Arrapahoe, and Apache Indians.
In testimony whereof, the undersigned, Commissioners on the part of the United states, and the chiefs and headmen of said tribes, have hereunto set their hands and seals at the council-ground on the Little Arkansas, in the State of Kansas, this 17th day of October, A. D. 1865.
John B. Sanborn,
Wm. S. Harney,
James Steele,
Wm. W. Bent,
Kit Carson,
Thos. Murphy,
J. H. Leavenworth,
Commissioners on the part of the United States.
Kou-zhon-ta-co, or Poor Bear, head chief, his x mark.,
Ba-zhe-ech, or Iron Shirt, his x mark.,
Az-che-om-a-te-ne, or the Old Fool Man, chief, his x mark.,
Karn-tin-ta, or The Crow, chief, his x mark.,
Mah-vip-pah, or The Wolf Sleeve, chief, his x mark.,
Nahn-tan, or The Chief, his x mark.,
On the part of the Apaches.
Moke-ta-ve-to, or Black Kettle, head chief, his x mark.,
Oh-to-ah-ne-so-to-wheo, or Seven Bulls, chief, his x mark.,
Hark-kah-o-me, or Little Robe, chief, his x mark.,
Moke-tah-vo-ve-ho, or Black White Man, chief, his x mark. ,
Mun-a-men-ek, or Eagle's Head, headman, his x mark.,
O-to-ah-nis-to, or Bull that Hears, headman, his x mark.,
On the part of the Cheyennes.
Oh-has-tee, or Little Raven, head chief, his x mark.,
Oh-hah-mah-hah, or Storm, chief, his x mark.,
Pah-uf-pah-top, or Big Mouth, chief, his x mark.,
Ah-cra-ka-tau-nah, or Spotted Wolf, chief, his x mark.,
Ah-nah-wat-tan, or Black Man, headman, his x mark.,
Nah-a-nah-cha, Chief in Everything, headman, his x mark.,
Chi-e-nuk, or Haversack, headthan, his x mark.,
On the part of the Arrapahoes.
Signed and sealed in presence of—
W. R. Irwin, Secretary.
D.C. McNeil.12 He was promoted to Brigadier General of the New Mexico Civil War volunteers on March 13, 1865.3 He commanded from 1866 to 1867 at Fort Garland, Costilla County, Colorado, The fort was built in 1858 on land that was part of the Sangre de Cristo Grant and replaced Fort Massachusetts. It was built of adobe in a plaza format typical of the surrounding villages. It was named for Brevet Brigadier General John Garland, then in command of the Department of New Mexico. In his year as post commandant Carson successfully negotiated with the Utes.13,14
Fort Garland
Fort Garland
Boggsville home where Kit and Josefa lived at the time of her death during childbirth
His wife, Maria, died on April 23, 1868 at age 40.2
Christopher died on May 23, 1868 at at the home of General William Henry Penrose in Ft. Lyon, Bent County, Colorado, at age 58.1,2 He was buried in Boggsville, Bent County, Colorado.15 His obituary stated:
His obituary read: "General Kit Carson died at this post between the hours of four and five o'clock, afternoon, this day, from disease of the heart, under which he has been laboring since his return from the east. He had been removed to the post some ten days since, so that Dr. Tilton, the post surgeon, could give him better attention than if he remained at his brother-in-law's, Mr. Boggs', home five miles distant.
Thus is announced the departure of an American citizen of pre-eminent worth and usefulness. His age, sixty-five years. The retrospect of his active life embraces the origin and growth of a scheme of empire, novel to human history. This individuality of the pioneer is in him especially embodied and illustrated.
His childhood was passed in Booslick (Boone's Lick), Missouri. He was reared in the small family group which surrounded the death bed of Daniel Boone. Departing from these associations at the delicate age of seventeen, he plunged into the immense wilderness of continent and ocean, then extending in unruffled silence from the Mississippi river to the China shore. With books and their contents he was little or not at all acquainted. In the fresh teachings of nature and her inspiring instincts he was profoundly instructed. Action, stirring, uninterrupted; and telling in prodigious results, has absorbed his well spent life.
To his companions Carson has been always known as [illegible word, perhaps "the"] most genial and excellent of men, - of sleepless activity wherever a charitable act has been within his reach. Daring, devoted, and sincere, his fidelity has been unblemished in every hour of his life, and in every relation. Citizen, soldier, husband, father, neighbor - in all these relations his guiding instinct has been innate chivalry, from the practice of which nothing has ever deflected him. He had in him a personal courage which came forth when wanted, like lightning from a could, at other times unobtrusive and unnoticed.
He has always been identified with Colorado, and has resided and died among us. The best of husbands and fathers, his family was a shining example of domestic love and happiness. His children, four sons and a daughter, all under fifteen years of age, are orphans worthy of their parents and wards of the American people. "
16
He was buried in 1869 in Kit Carson Cemetery in Taos, Taos County, New Mexico, moved to the area that was his home for much of his adult life.15
Kit Carson Tombstone

Family 1

Waa-Nibe b. 1819, d. 1838
Children

Family 2

Making-Out-Road b. 1823, d. 1890

Family 3

Maria Josefa Jaramillo b. March 19, 1828, d. April 23, 1868
Children

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
  2. [S2000] Stephen Chinn, October 8, 2001.
  3. [S2011] Internet Site: The Civil War in New Mexico).
  4. [S2003] Internet Site: American Explorer).
  5. [S2038] Unknown author, Kit Carson: A Profile for Heros.
  6. [S2006] Internet Site: Authentic Legend of the Desert Southwest).
  7. [S2009] Internet Site: Kit Carson History).
  8. [S2008] Internet Site: Kit Carson Mountain Man by Matt Thome and Katie Wurden).
  9. [S4509] U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1850-1900, Ancestry.com (database online), 2004.
  10. [S8953] 1850 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Christopher Carson household.
  11. [S8954] 1860 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Christopher Carson household.
  12. [S1594] Internet Site: Indian Affairs, Laws and Treaties, Volume 2Ancestry web site).
  13. [S2012] Internet Site: Commander Christopher "Kit" Carson at Fort Garland).
  14. [S2050] Internet Site: The Story of Fort Garland (1858 - 1883)).
  15. [S2007] Internet Site: Cristopher 'Kit' Carson's Grave).
  16. [S2001] Kit Carson Obituary, May 27, 1868.

Waa-Nibe1

F, #14266, b. 1819, d. 1838
      She was an Arapahoe indian.2 Waa-Nibe was also known as Singing Wind.1 Waa-Nibe was born in 1819.2
Waa-Nibemarried,Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson (his first marriage) , son of Lindsey Carson and Rebecca Robertson, in 1835.1,2
Waa-Nibe died in 1838 in New Mexico.2

Family

Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson b. December 24, 1809, d. May 23, 1868
Children

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
  2. [S2000] Stephen Chinn, October 8, 2001.
  3. [S8954] 1860 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Christopher Carson household.

Adaline Carson1

F, #14267, b. circa 1830
Father*Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson1 b. December 24, 1809, d. May 23, 1868
Mother*Waa-Nibe1 b. 1819, d. 1838
     Adaline married Louis Simmons.2
Adaline married George Stilts.2 Adaline Carson, daughter of Christopher Houston "Kit" Carson and Waa-Nibe, was born circa 1830 in New Mexico.1 Adaline Carson returned to Missouri in 1842 to be cared for and educated.3 She returned with her father to New Mexico in June, 1851; He left Kansas city, Missouri early in June 1951 with 12 of Lucien Maxwell's wagons filled with goods, bound for Santa Fe. The company consisted of Carson, his daughter, Adaline, his niece, Susan (wife of Jesse Nelson), and 15 employees (Jesse Nelson, a French-Canadian and 13 Mexicans.)3

Family 1

George Stilts

Family 2

Louis Simmons

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
  2. [S2000] Stephen Chinn, October 8, 2001.
  3. [S2038] Unknown author, Kit Carson: A Profile for Heros.

Rumalda Luna Boggs1

F, #14268, b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
Father*Thomas Oliver Boggs1 b. August 22, 1824
Mother*Maria Ignacia Jaramillo1 b. circa 1825
     Rumalda married Thomas Oliver Boggs, son of Lilburn Williams Boggs and Panthea Grant Boone, circa 1850.1,2 Rumalda Luna Boggs, daughter of Thomas Oliver Boggs and Maria Ignacia Jaramillo, was born on October 6, 1850 in New Mexico.1
Rumalda (her first marriage) marrried Charles Alois Ritz (his first marriage) on November 4, 1865.1
Rumalda (her second marriage) married Manuel Gonzales circa 1874.1
Rumalda died on March 27, 1925 at age 74.1

Family 1

Charles Alois Ritz b. 1835
Children

Family 2

Manuel Gonzales
Children

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
  2. [S7633] J. D. Brown e-mail to Robert Berg, September 20, 2007.

Charles Adolfo Boggs1

M, #14269, b. 1848
Father*Thomas Oliver Boggs1 b. August 22, 1824
Mother*Maria Ignacia Jaramillo1 b. circa 1825
     Charles Adolfo Boggs, son of Thomas Oliver Boggs and Maria Ignacia Jaramillo, was born in 1848.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Manuel Gonzales1

M, #14270
      Manuel married Rumalda Luna Boggs (her second marriage), daughter of Thomas Oliver Boggs and Maria Ignacia Jaramillo, circa 1874.1

Family

Rumalda Luna Boggs b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
Children

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Charles Alois Ritz1

M, #14271, b. 1835
     Charles Alois Ritz was born in 1835 in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany.1
Charles (his first marriage) married Rumalda Luna Boggs (her first marriage), daughter of Thomas Oliver Boggs and Maria Ignacia Jaramillo, on November 4, 1865.1

Family

Rumalda Luna Boggs b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
Children

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Agnes Gonzales1

F, #14272, b. 1875
Father*Manuel Gonzales1
Mother*Rumalda Luna Boggs1 b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
     Agnes Gonzales, daughter of Manuel Gonzales and Rumalda Luna Boggs, was born in 1875.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Margarita Gonzales1

F, #14273, b. after 1874
Father*Manuel Gonzales1
Mother*Rumalda Luna Boggs1 b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
     Margarita Gonzales, daughter of Manuel Gonzales and Rumalda Luna Boggs, was born after 1874.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

David Gonzales1

M, #14274, b. after 1874
Father*Manuel Gonzales1
Mother*Rumalda Luna Boggs1 b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
     David Gonzales, son of Manuel Gonzales and Rumalda Luna Boggs, was born after 1874.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Laura Ritz1

F, #14275, b. November, 1867
Father*Charles Alois Ritz1 b. 1835
Mother*Rumalda Luna Boggs1 b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
     Laura Ritz, daughter of Charles Alois Ritz and Rumalda Luna Boggs, was born in November, 1867 in Taos, Taos County, New Mexico.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Alice Cara Ritz1

F, #14276, b. July 9, 1868
Father*Charles Alois Ritz1 b. 1835
Mother*Rumalda Luna Boggs1 b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
     Alice Cara Ritz, daughter of Charles Alois Ritz and Rumalda Luna Boggs, was born on July 9, 1868 in Taos, Taos County, New Mexico.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Ignacia Adela Ritz1

F, #14277, b. February 16, 1870
Father*Charles Alois Ritz1 b. 1835
Mother*Rumalda Luna Boggs1 b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
     Ignacia Adela Ritz, daughter of Charles Alois Ritz and Rumalda Luna Boggs, was born on February 16, 1870 in Taos, Taos County, New Mexico.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Margarita Ritz1

F, #14278, b. circa 1870
Father*Charles Alois Ritz1 b. 1835
Mother*Rumalda Luna Boggs1 b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
     Margarita Ritz, daughter of Charles Alois Ritz and Rumalda Luna Boggs, was born circa 1870 in Taos, Taos County, New Mexico.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

David Ritz1

M, #14279, b. circa 1870
Father*Charles Alois Ritz1 b. 1835
Mother*Rumalda Luna Boggs1 b. October 6, 1850, d. March 27, 1925
     David Ritz, son of Charles Alois Ritz and Rumalda Luna Boggs, was born circa 1870 in Taos, Taos County, New Mexico.1

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Sonora Louisa Hicklin1

F, #14280, b. August 5, 1825, d. March 5, 1902
Father*John Hicklin2
Mother*Mary Flourney Gleaves2
     Sonora Louisa Hicklin, daughter of John Hicklin and Mary Flourney Gleaves, was born on August 5, 1825 in Cass, Greenwood County, Missouri.2
Sonora married William Montgomery Boggs, son of Lilburn Williams Boggs and Panthea Grant Boone, circa 1846.1
Sonora was enumerated with her husband, William Montgomery Boggs under the name of "Sonora Boggs" on the 1850 U. S. Census for Sonoma County, California. She was listed as a 48-year-old female born in Missouri.3,1
Sonora was enumerated with her husband, William Montgomery Boggs under the name of "Sonora Boggs" on the 1870 U. S. Census for Napa, Napa County, California. She was listed as 43-year-old female born in Missouri and keeping house.4
Sonora died on March 5, 1902 at age 76.2

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1850Sonoma County, CaliforniaWilliam Montgomery Boggs3,1
1870Napa, Napa County, CaliforniaWilliam Montgomery Boggs4

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
  2. [S1594] Internet Site: Gene Pool Individual Records, October 8, 2001Ancestry web site).
  3. [S2057] 1850 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Wm. M. Boggs household.
  4. [S2679] 1870 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), William M. Boggs household.