Mary Carter1

F, #14371, b. 1747/48
     Mary Carter was born in 1747/48 in Scotland.1
Mary married Silas Bent, son of Elijah Bent and Susanna Stone, in 1765 at Barre, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1 Mary Carter and Silas Bent moved in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio. Moving with Mary were Silas Bent, Mary Bent, Polly Bent, Susan Bent, Abigail Bent, Persis Bent, Nahum Bent, Abner Bent, Dorcus Bent, Daniel Bent and Charlotte Bent.2 Mary Carter and Silas Bent moved in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio. Moving with Mary were Mary Bent, Silas Bent, Polly Bent, Susan Bent, Abigail Bent, Persis Bent, Nahum Bent, Abner Bent, Dorcus Bent, Daniel Bent and Charlotte Bent.3

Family

Silas Bent b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Children

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Charles Silas Russell1

M, #14372, b. March 7, 1833
Father*Joseph Russell1
Mother*Lucy Bent1 b. March 8, 1805, d. March 2, 1871
Charles Silas Russell
From Family Tree on Ancestry
     Charles Silas Russell, son of Joseph Russell and Lucy Bent, was born on March 7, 1833 in St. Louis, Missouri.1
Charles married Mary E. Mead in 1856 at Missouri.1

Family

Mary E. Mead b. 1837
Child

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Mary E. Mead1

F, #14373, b. 1837
     Mary E. Mead was born in 1837 in St. Louis, Missouri.1
Mary married Charles Silas Russell, son of Joseph Russell and Lucy Bent, in 1856 at Missouri.1

Family

Charles Silas Russell b. March 7, 1833
Child

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Charles Marion Russell1

M, #14374, b. March 19, 1864, d. October 24, 1926
Father*Charles Silas Russell1 b. March 7, 1833
Mother*Mary E. Mead1 b. 1837
Charles Marion Russell
Charles Marion Russell
Nancy Cooper Russell and Charles Marion Russell
      Known as "The Cowboy Artist," was an illlustrator, writer, philosopher,
and humorist who faithfully and devotedly recorded the spirit of the Old
West.
Charles Marion Russell was born in Oak Hill, St. Louis, Missouri in 1864
and died in Great Falls, Montana in 1926. He was the foremost Western
painter specializing in Indian genre, an illustrator, sculptor, and
writer. They knew him as the "cowboy artist."
Russell attended Clinton and Oak Hill schools beginning in 1872. A poor
student, they sent him to military school in New Jersey for a term in
1879, then was permitted by his well-to-do father to travel to remote
Montana to work as a sheepherder. "I did not stay long, but I did not
think my employer missed me much. I soon took up with a hunter and
trapper named Jake Hoover. This life suited me. I stayed for two years.
(In 1881), I struck a cow outfit coming in to receive 1,000 dougies. The
boss hired me to night-wrangle horses. I was considered worthless. For
eleven years, I sung to the horses and cattle. In 1888, I stayed about
six months with the Blood Indians. In the spring of 1889, I went back to
the Judith, taking my old place as a wrangler. In the fall of 1891, I
received a letter from ‘Pretty Charlie,' a bartender in Great Falls,
saying I could make $75.00 a month and grub. When I arrived I was
introduced to Mr. G who pulled a contract as long as a stake rope for me
to sign. Everything I drew, modeled or painted in a year was to be his. I
balked. I put in with a bunch of cowpunchers, a roundup cook and a prize
fighter out of a job, and we wintered. Next fall I returned to Great
Falls, took up the paint brush and have never ‘sung to them' since." The
Outing Magazine, December, 1904.
Even when he was "singing" to the stock, "Kid" Russell was sketching and
painting, expanding his self-taught talent. Hard-drinking and
pleasure-loving, bullnecked and lantern-jawed, he gave his pictures to
any friend who wanted one. In 1888 his "Caught In The Act" was published
in Harper's Weekly. In 1890, fourteen of his oils were reproduced in New
York City. In 1893, saloon keepers were the first Russell collectors.
When he married in 1896, his wife became his business manager. By 1904,
he was sculpting in bronze. By 1911, his works were selling in New York
City for what he called "dead men's prices." In his thousands of
pictures, the favorite subject was Indians. At least forty-nine showed
the buffalo hunt. Many were of Indian women but white women were rarely
shown.
Charlie was born March 19, 1864 at St. Louis, Missouri. The town was the western end of the fur trade so that atmosphere had a great influence on his life. His great uncle was William Bent, first white settler in Colorado on the Arkansas River. Bent started Bent's Fort where he was known for fair dealing with the Indians. So the spirit of going west also came from his father's side. His talent for art came from his mother's side, especially from his mother. He got his talent for storytelling from her too, which later made him almost as famous as his art.

He showed talent at an early age. He was spanked by his mother for drawing Indians and ponies on the walls. He also liked modeling with clay. He received a horse named Jip at a young age and was never without a horse after that. He was a poor student because he didn't like being cooped up inside and found it difficult to learn from books.

In March 1880, he got the chance to go west at 16. A friend of his father's was going to Montana and Charlie went with them. His father figured a few weeks of "roughing it" would cure him. Not so. He traveled with Wallis W "Pike" Miller who was part owner of a sheep ranch on the Upper Judith Basin in central Montana. They rode the Union Pacific and the Utah Northern as far as Red Rock, Montana. Then they went by stagecoach to Helena. There they got supplies for the 200 mile trip to the ranch. They arrived at the ranch of William Korrel in April 1880. Miller's ranch was "next door."

His first job was as a sheepherder for Miller, but he hated it. In his first weeks, he sketched when he should have been looking after sheep and lost them frequently. He also modeled small animals out of clay. While sketching and modeling he listened to people telling yarns. During that time he bought his first horse, a Cayuse pony he called Monte, that he had for 23 years. He quit before he could get fired. He tried to find a job wrangling horses, but his disaster with the sheep got ahead of him. By good luck he found Jake Hoover, a trapper-hunter-prospector. For the next two years, Russell lived with Hoover on the South Fork of the Judith River, learning about wild animals. He also learned the ways of the frontiersman from Jake and his friends. This was when Charlie did his first serious work with watercolors.

A year later he took a trip home. On his way back near Helena, he met a ranch foreman who offered him a temporary job wrangling hroses. As luck would have it, a bad wrangler needed to be replaced so Charlie got the job. He took his responsibility seriously, especially because the Piegan Indians in the area had killed some men and stolen some horses. It was a good job because he gained good experience. This led to a full time job as a night herder for Nelson True. He took this very seriously too since he was being entrusted with the livelihood of the ranch.

During that fall on the drive to market at Miles City was when he first came in contact with many of the indigenous tribes. Crow, Assiniboine, and Piegan Indians still roamed free in the area. Reservations had not yet come, but they weren't far off. When the railroad opened, settlers had flooded to Montana and the Indians didn't like it.

After this drive he settled at Pagel Gulch near Utica. He built a cabin there. There he met Lollie Edgars who he was quite interested in. Unfortunately her parents persuaded her against Charlie and he was heartbroken. It was a long time before he got serious about a woman again. But he did get more serious about his art. He continued to keep steady work, while still painting and scupting. He always listened closely to the tales told so he could capture them in paint or clay. He started working seriously with oils in 1885 when only 21. That year he created the first oil that got national attention, "Caught in the Act." .

In the spring there was less work to do and many just hung out. Charlie spent his spare time at saloons drinking whiskey with the boys and illustrating their stories. His first studio was in the back of a saloon at Utica, owned by his friend Jim Shelton.

In 1886-87 he was a wrangler at the Bar R owned by Stadler and Kaufman. Russell's name is often associated with this outfit. This was when his artist career really took off. One of his most famous sketches was one called "The Last of the Five Thousand," probably named after the 5,000 head that Sadler and Kaufman lost that year in a bad winter. It was a bitterly cold winter and Charlie's picture depicted a starving cow all skin and bones with circling wolves waiting for it to die. He called it "Waiting for a Chinook" but the other name was more popular. The sketch was sent with a letter to Kaufman in Helena in a report. The drawing got a lot of attention from the locals. Many went broke that year and could sadly relate. Copies of the sketch were in great demand and post card forms of it were sent all over the world. This picture helped prodded the cattlemen to put aside emergency supplies in case of bad winters.

He spent the summer of 1888 with the Bloods, a northern band of the Blackfoot. He learned their language, sign language, customs, habits, legends, and costumes. He adopted their long hair and clothes. He was known and trusted by the Indians.

After that he worked for awhile for Johnie Mathewson, the last of the old time freighters. Then he went to the Teton River Valley in Montana, where he met Horace Brewster, his first boss on the range. The farmers were coming by that time and fencing the open range with barbed wire, an act that dismayed Charlie. Towns were springing up everywhere encroaching on the range. He was a horse wrangler on the Milk River, near the border, and then in Lewistown. While at Lewistown, he painted a picture on the vault door of a bank for $25.

In 1891, he was invited to Great Falls by Charlie Green, a bartender. He met Albert Trigg here, who became a good friend and agent for his paintings. In 1892, he went back to his old job as a night herder on the Milk River. It was the last job he would have in the cow country. That winter Charlie painted pictures for money that kept he and his friends alive. His friend Kid Price acted as salesman, selling the paintings. Soon they scraped together enough to open their own saloon, but they went bust, and Charlie went back to painting. From 1893-96 he spent his time at Great Falls and Cascade, painting and sculpting. He gave many of them away, but some were sold.

In 1895, his mother died. His great sadness brought him and his father closer. In 1896, when Charlie was 32, he met Nancy Cooper who was 18. He met her when having dinner one night with the Ben Roberts family. She was their housekeeper. They were married on September 9, 1896. Life got a little more serious then since he now had obligations, so he started taking more care with his paintings. Charlie had always practically given his paintings away, even when he got money for them. But Nancy had a talent for business and soon became his manager. This was fine with Charlie. Russell once remarked that his manager-wife, "lives for tomorrow, but I live for yesterday." She was also responsible for getting him of the booze.

They moved from Cascade to Great Falls in 1897 to a four-room house. It wasn't until 1903 he got a decent studio built, a studio patterned after Jake Hoover's cabin. It was a studio as much as a place to swap stories with his old friends. His favorite camping area was the modern day Glacier National Park, because he could see so many of the wild animals he loved to draw in their natural habitat. He built a summer home there, near Lake McDonald just over Gunsight Pass.

One of his best friends was Con Price of the Lazy KY ranch. Con once worked with Kid Curry before he turned outlaw. His ranch was on the Sweet Grass Hills. Charlie helped Con finance his ranch. He also bought some of his own land right next door and they formed a partnership.

He was devastated in 1903, when his favorite horse Monte died at 31, very old for a horse. He agonized greatly when he had to destroy his horse Red Bird a short time later when it contracted rheumatism. He was outraged when they rounded up all the wild mustangs after World War I to be made into fertilizer and food products. He thought it was awful to treat the animal that carried settlers across the country and built the highways and railroads and towns, in such a terrible manner.

In 1903, he went to New York City to meet with some agents. He made several other trips east for business but always hated it. It wasn't until a gallery exhibit in 1911 did he finally get the recognition he deserved. He published in more than 50 magazines in color, in over 100 art calendars, 69 books, thousands of sketches, and made 70 sculptures reproduced in bronze.

The demand went up for his work and there were all kinds of deadlines, but he never let it faze him. He had most trouble with human anatomy. He often got in front of a mirror and contort in various ways so he could see how muscles and limbs worked. He also watched men during rodeos, especially the Calgary Stampede, to see how their bodies were positioned when riding. His opinion on studying abroad: "I don't see how a Dutchman or a Frenchman could teach me to apint the things in my own country."

In 1906 he went to Mexico to do a series of pictures for a magazine. In 1914, he went to London for a showing. He returned on the Lusitania. He visited Paris while there, but hated it. About 50 of his original painted sculptures remain. The first cast in bronze was one called "Smoking Up," a cowboy on a bucking horse, shooting it up. Most of his bronzes are Indians and animals.

He knew many famous people, including Will Rogers, Tom Mix, and Douglas Fairbanks. He knew Kid Curry and always knew Kid wasn't really a bad man, he just made a mistake. He met Teddy Roosevelt. He was also very free with his help to young aspiring artists.

Another good friend was Reverend W. W. Van Orsdel, a methodist minister. He met him when the Reverend stopped to spend the night at Jake Hoover's place. He preached and sang religious songs all over frontier Montana. This, combined with his Christian upbringing, led Charlie to never judge one man's religion as better than another. He always knew there had to be a higher being that created all that beautiful nature that he loved so much.

Charlie didn't talk about his feelings much, but much is known through the many letters he wrote that were published by his wife after his death. Only 134 copies were made of these published letters. He also wrote "Rawhide Rawlins Stories," a series of stories told by Charlie's fictional character Rawhide Rawlins. It was publised in 1921 and again in 1925. He also wrote some poetry.

Through his letters we know he was a painter, not because of a sense of purpose such as income, but because he loved it. He could sense the "wild west" he loved was coming to an end and needed to record it before it was gone. Russell faithfully painted what he saw, especially details. Viewers would know what tribe was represented by the details in the painting. The details were important historically and he refused any commissions in which he would have to paint something that couldn't or wouldn't happen that way in real life. He was always very respectful of women, no matter their station in life, even the women of the red light district. He greatly respected Indians in a time when it was not popular to do so. He was sympathetic to the Indians because of white man's treatment of them. He understood their philosophy and religion and way of life and that is reflected in his paintings. Flathead, Arapaho, Kootenai, Blackfoot, and Crow were most numerous. His favorite was the Blackfoot, composed of the Blackfoot, Piegans, and Bloods.

He never liked technological progress, so he always wore his range clothes even in the big city. He always wore his trademark red sash. He didn't wear a belt because he would "feel like a woman." He was always very modest and was embarrassed when people praised his talent; he said he couldn't take credit when God gave him his talent and nature was his teacher. He loved kids and liked to tell them stories and make drawings for them. In 1916, he adopted a son, Jack.

On June 15, 1925, the University of Montana at Missoula gave Russell an honorary Doctor of Laws, an award for attaining greater prominence in art than any other Montana resident in any other field.

The following year he had surgery for goiter. His health was complicated by the sciatic-rheumatism that left him weakened. After that he knew he wouldn't live much longer. He could no longer ride a horse, which he hated. He died on October 24, 1926. His property and studio in Great Falls were deeded to the city as a memorial. The local Indians thought so much of him they took up a collection for the memorial. The hearse was drawn by horses, a request by Russell. And the church displayed 20 of his pictures on loan from their owners. The entire town shut down and schools were let out so everyone could pay their respects to Montana's greatest son.1,2
Charles Marion Russell
Note To A Friend
Charles Marion Russell
Indian Head
Charles Marion Russell
Poster
Charles Marion Russell
Group of Friends
Charles Marion Russell
Silver Dollar Poster
Charles Marion Russell
Cattle Round Up
Charles Marion Russell
Charles Marion Russell
Oasis Saloon Poster
Charles Marion Russell, son of Charles Silas Russell and Mary E. Mead, was born on March 19, 1864 in Oak Hill, St. Louis County, Missouri.1
Charles married Nancy Cooper on September 9, 1896 at Cascade, Cascade County, Montana.1
Charles died on October 24, 1926 in Great Falls, Cascade County, Montana, at age 62.1

Family

Nancy Cooper b. May 4, 1878

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.
  2. [S2042] Internet Site: Charles Marion Russel Information from Web Sites).

Nancy Cooper1

F, #14375, b. May 4, 1878
Nancy Cooper Russell and Charles Marion Russell
     Nancy Cooper was born on May 4, 1878 in Mannsville, Taylor County, Kentucky.1
Nancy married Charles Marion Russell, son of Charles Silas Russell and Mary E. Mead, on September 9, 1896 at Cascade, Cascade County, Montana.1

Family

Charles Marion Russell b. March 19, 1864, d. October 24, 1926

Citations

  1. [S1859] RootsWeb's WorldConnect Project.

Mary Bent1

F, #14376, b. July 29, 1766
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Mary Bent, daughter of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on July 29, 1766 in Barre, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Mary moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Mary moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Polly Bent1

F, #14377, b. September 23, 1769
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Polly Bent, daughter of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on September 23, 1769 in Rutland, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Polly moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Polly moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Susan Bent1

F, #14378, b. April 21, 1771
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Susan Bent, daughter of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on April 21, 1771 in Rutland, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Susan moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Susan moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Abigail Bent1

F, #14379, b. March 7, 1773
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Abigail Bent, daughter of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on March 7, 1773 in Rutland, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Abigail moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Abigail moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Persis Bent1

F, #14380, b. September 5, 1775
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Persis Bent, daughter of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on September 5, 1775 in Rutland, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Persis moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Persis moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Nahum Bent1

?, #14381, b. July 10, 1777
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Nahum Bent, child of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on July 10, 1777 in Rutland, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Nahum moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Nahum moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Abner Bent1

M, #14382, b. September 22, 1780
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Abner Bent, son of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on September 22, 1780 in Rutland, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Abner moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Abner moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Dorcus Bent1

F, #14383, b. August 9, 1782
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Dorcus Bent, daughter of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on August 9, 1782 in Rutland, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Dorcus moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Dorcus moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Daniel Bent1

M, #14384, b. February 3, 1785
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Daniel Bent, son of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on February 3, 1785 in Rutland, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Daniel moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Daniel moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Charlotte Bent1

F, #14385, b. August 1, 1787
Father*Silas Bent1 b. April 14, 1744, d. April 4, 1818
Mother*Mary Carter1 b. 1747/48
     Charlotte Bent, daughter of Silas Bent and Mary Carter, was born on August 1, 1787 in Rutland, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Charlotte moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1789 from Massachusetts to Marietta, Washington County, Ohio.2
Charlotte moved along with Silas Bent and Mary Carter in 1790 from Marietta, Ohio to Belpre, Washington County, Ohio.3

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S2053] Internet Site: Settlers Who Arrived in Marietta, Ohio in 1789).
  3. [S2054] Internet Site: History).

Elijah Bent1

M, #14386, b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Father*Hopestill Bent1 b. January 17, 1672, d. August 18, 1725
Mother*Elizabeth Brown1 b. March 17, 1677
     Elijah Bent, son of Hopestill Bent and Elizabeth Brown, was born on August 15, 1713 in Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Elijah married Susanna Stone in 1738 at Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Elijah died on May 2, 1738 in Barre, Worchester County, Massachusetts Bay Colony, at age 24.1

Family

Susanna Stone b. April 24, 1720
Children

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Susanna Stone1

F, #14387, b. April 24, 1720
     Susanna Stone was born on April 24, 1720 in Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Susanna married Elijah Bent, son of Hopestill Bent and Elizabeth Brown, in 1738 at Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Family

Elijah Bent b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Children

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Elijah Bent1

M, #14388, b. October 7, 1739
Father*Elijah Bent1 b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Mother*Susanna Stone1 b. April 24, 1720
     Elijah Bent, son of Elijah Bent and Susanna Stone, was born on October 7, 1739 in Farmingham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Dorcus Bent1

F, #14389, b. January 1, 1742
Father*Elijah Bent1 b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Mother*Susanna Stone1 b. April 24, 1720
     Dorcus Bent, daughter of Elijah Bent and Susanna Stone, was born on January 1, 1742 in East Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Susannah Bent1

F, #14390, b. April 14, 1744
Father*Elijah Bent1 b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Mother*Susanna Stone1 b. April 24, 1720
     Susannah Bent, daughter of Elijah Bent and Susanna Stone, was born on April 14, 1744 in East Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Joel Bent1

M, #14391, b. February 22, 1750
Father*Elijah Bent1 b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Mother*Susanna Stone1 b. April 24, 1720
     Joel Bent, son of Elijah Bent and Susanna Stone, was born on February 22, 1750 in East Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Stephen Bent1

M, #14392, b. July 15, 1752
Father*Elijah Bent1 b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Mother*Susanna Stone1 b. April 24, 1720
     Stephen Bent, son of Elijah Bent and Susanna Stone, was born on July 15, 1752 in East Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Rufus Bent1

M, #14393, b. February 13, 1755
Father*Elijah Bent1 b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Mother*Susanna Stone1 b. April 24, 1720
     Rufus Bent, son of Elijah Bent and Susanna Stone, was born on February 13, 1755 in East Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Abigail Bent1

F, #14394, b. September 3, 1757
Father*Elijah Bent1 b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Mother*Susanna Stone1 b. April 24, 1720
     Abigail Bent, daughter of Elijah Bent and Susanna Stone, was born on September 3, 1757 in East Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Nathan Bent1

M, #14395, b. March 12, 1760
Father*Elijah Bent1 b. August 15, 1713, d. May 2, 1738
Mother*Susanna Stone1 b. April 24, 1720
     Nathan Bent, son of Elijah Bent and Susanna Stone, was born on March 12, 1760 in East Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Hopestill Bent1

M, #14396, b. January 17, 1672, d. August 18, 1725
Father*Peter Bent1 b. April 14, 1629, d. May, 1678
Mother*Elizabeth (?)1 b. 1628
     Hopestill Bent, son of Peter Bent and Elizabeth (?), was born on January 17, 1672 in Marlboro, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Hopestill married Elizabeth Brown on November 27, 1700 at Massachusetts Bay Colony.1
Hopestill died on August 18, 1725 at age 53.1

Family

Elizabeth Brown b. March 17, 1677
Children

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Elizabeth Brown1

F, #14397, b. March 17, 1677
     Elizabeth Brown was born on March 17, 1677.1
Elizabeth married Hopestill Bent, son of Peter Bent and Elizabeth (?), on November 27, 1700 at Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Family

Hopestill Bent b. January 17, 1672, d. August 18, 1725
Children

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Martha Bent1

F, #14398, b. September 15, 1701
Father*Hopestill Bent1 b. January 17, 1672, d. August 18, 1725
Mother*Elizabeth Brown1 b. March 17, 1677
     Martha Bent, daughter of Hopestill Bent and Elizabeth Brown, was born on September 15, 1701 in Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Peter Bent1

M, #14399, b. May 17, 1703
Father*Hopestill Bent1 b. January 17, 1672, d. August 18, 1725
Mother*Elizabeth Brown1 b. March 17, 1677
     Peter Bent, son of Hopestill Bent and Elizabeth Brown, was born on May 17, 1703 in Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Thomas Bent1

M, #14400, b. July 29, 1706
Father*Hopestill Bent1 b. January 17, 1672, d. August 18, 1725
Mother*Elizabeth Brown1 b. March 17, 1677
     Thomas Bent, son of Hopestill Bent and Elizabeth Brown, was born on July 29, 1706 in Sudbury, Middlesex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.