James Scutt1

M, #15181
Father*Jonathan Scutt1
Mother*Ann Adee1
     James married Charity Smith.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Charity Smith1

F, #15182
     Charity married James Scutt, son of Jonathan Scutt and Ann Adee.1

Family

James Scutt

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Hugh Scutt1

M, #15183
Father*Jonathan Scutt1
Mother*Ann Adee1
     Hugh married Matilda Warren.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Matilda Warren1

F, #15184
     Matilda married Hugh Scutt, son of Jonathan Scutt and Ann Adee.1

Family

Hugh Scutt

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Silas Scutt1

M, #15185
Father*Jonathan Scutt1
Mother*Ann Adee1
     Silas married Lydia Randall.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Lydia Randall1

F, #15186
     Lydia married Silas Scutt, son of Jonathan Scutt and Ann Adee.1

Family

Silas Scutt

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Horace Scutt1

M, #15187, b. 1817, d. January 24, 1856
Father*Jonathan Scutt1
Mother*Ann Adee1
     Horace Scutt, son of Jonathan Scutt and Ann Adee, was born in 1817 in Bovina, Delaware County, New York.1
Horace married Eunice Stratton in 1845.1
Horace died on January 24, 1856 in Malta, DeKalb County, Illinois.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Dewitt Scutt1

M, #15188, b. circa 1828
Father*Jonathan Scutt1
Mother*Ann Adee1
     Dewitt died in Decatur, Morgan County, Alabama.1
Dewitt married Mary Adelia Secord.1
Dewitt married Maria Collins at Dwight, Livingston County, Illinois.1 Dewitt Scutt, son of Jonathan Scutt and Ann Adee, was born circa 1828 in Delaware County, New York.1

Family 1

Maria Collins

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Mary Adelia Secord1

F, #15189
     Mary married Dewitt Scutt, son of Jonathan Scutt and Ann Adee.1

Family

Dewitt Scutt b. circa 1828

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Maria Collins1

F, #15190

Family

Dewitt Scutt b. circa 1828

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

John Scutt1

M, #15191
Father*Jonathan Scutt1
Mother*Ann Adee1
     John married Polly Seely.1

Family

Polly Seely

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Polly Seely1

F, #15192
     Polly married John Scutt, son of Jonathan Scutt and Ann Adee.1

Family

John Scutt

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Samuel Adee Scutt1

M, #15193
Father*Jonathan Scutt1
Mother*Ann Adee1
     Samuel married Charity Stratton.1

Family

Charity Stratton
Children

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Thomas Hyzer1

M, #15194
     Thomas married Rachel Ferguson.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Rachel Ferguson1

F, #15195
     Rachel married Thomas Hyzer.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Mary Ann Green1

F, #15196
     Mary married Milo Scutt, son of William Scutt and Azuba O'Conner.1 Mrs. Mary Ann Scutt was buried in Deposit Village Cemetery in Deposit, Broome County, New York.1

Family

Milo Scutt b. 1840
Children

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Deposit Village Cemetery (Deposit, NY)

?, #15197
     Deposit Village Cemetery (Deposit, NY) is located in Deposit, Broome County, New York, 42.059758, -75.427675.

The following people are buried here.


Milo Scutt.1

Mrs. Mary Ann Scutt.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Charles Clinton Scutt1

M, #15198, b. July 30, 1871, d. May 4, 1938
Father*Milo Scutt1 b. 1840
Mother*Mary Ann Green1
     Charles Clinton Scutt, son of Milo Scutt and Mary Ann Green, was born on July 30, 1871.1
Charles married Winnifred Stimpson on September 19, 1894.1
Charles died on May 4, 1938 at age 66.1 He was buried in Hancock, Delaware County, New York.1

Family

Winnifred Stimpson b. September 2, 1874, d. February 2, 1946

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Mary E. Scutt1

F, #15199, b. May 26, 1875
Father*Milo Scutt1 b. 1840
Mother*Mary Ann Green1
     Mary E. Scutt, daughter of Milo Scutt and Mary Ann Green, was born on May 26, 1875.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Ann Elizabeth Fuller1

F, #15201
     Ann married Hiram Scutt, son of Jonathan Scutt and Ann Adee.2

Family

Hiram Scutt b. September 3, 1815, d. September 24, 1886
Children

Citations

  1. [S1594] Internet Site: Ancestry web site).
  2. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Augusta M. Scutt1

F, #15202, b. December 8, 1838, d. May 20, 1871
Father*Hiram Scutt1 b. September 3, 1815, d. September 24, 1886
Mother*Ann Elizabeth Fuller1
     Augusta married Abraham Hyzer.1 Augusta M. Scutt, daughter of Hiram Scutt and Ann Elizabeth Fuller, was born on December 8, 1838.1
Augusta died on May 20, 1871 at age 32.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Abraham Hyzer1

M, #15203
     Abraham married Augusta M. Scutt, daughter of Hiram Scutt and Ann Elizabeth Fuller.1

Family

Augusta M. Scutt b. December 8, 1838, d. May 20, 1871

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Sarah L. Scutt1

F, #15204, b. April 2, 1840, d. March 11, 1907
Father*Hiram Scutt1 b. September 3, 1815, d. September 24, 1886
Mother*Ann Elizabeth Fuller1
     Sarah married William Light.1 Sarah L. Scutt, daughter of Hiram Scutt and Ann Elizabeth Fuller, was born on April 2, 1840.1
Sarah died on March 11, 1907 at age 66.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

William Light1

M, #15205
     William married Sarah L. Scutt, daughter of Hiram Scutt and Ann Elizabeth Fuller.1

Family

Sarah L. Scutt b. April 2, 1840, d. March 11, 1907

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Webb AFB

?, #15206
3560th Pilot Training Wing
Webb Air Force Base, Texas
Webb Air Force Base, Texas
Flight Line
Webb Air Force Base, Texas
Webb Air Force Base, Texas
Flight Line
Webb Air Force Base, Texas
Flight Line
Cessna T37 Gooney Bird
Webb Air Force Base, Texas
Hanger
Webb Air Force Base, Texas
Webb Air Force Base, Texas
Flight Line
Webb Air Force Base, Texas
Lockheed T39 Trainer
      Relics of the Sky
Big Spring’s Hangar 25 revives old memories
Ken Ellsworth

BIG SPRING — Tough pilots and bombardiers have been known to weep when they visit the big old building called Hangar 25 Air Museum.

The hangar was restored about a year ago and converted for use as a military museum. It is on the grounds of the former Webb Air Force Base in the southwestern portion of the city. The old base is now known as McMahon Wrinkle Air Park.

Between 1942 and 1977, when Webb Air Force Base closed for good, some 14,000 fighter pilots and 6,000 bombardiers trained there. The bombardier school and Webb closed after World War II. Only pilots were trained there after the base reopened during the Korean War. During its last years of operation, pilots from allied foreign countries trained at Webb.

Obviously, many of those who graduated as bombardiers and pilots went off to wars and conflicts from which they did not return. When you visit Hangar 25, you think of that most of all. So, it is no wonder that tough men cry.

It was for one of those who did not return that Webb AFB was named — James L. Webb Jr., a Big Spring High School graduate. He died when his P-51 Mustang fighter crashed near Japan in 1949.

Just looking at an old airplane on display in the museum can induce tears from the men who return to experience Hangar 25. Just a couple of weeks ago, Susan Lewis, museum coordinator, led two different of groups of former Webb trainees on museum tours on successive days. An old, but still air worthy AT-11 on loan to the museum, stopped both groups cold.

“They just stood there and looked at the airplane and cried,” Lewis said. “An AT-11 is a very emotional airplane to them.”

The duel-propeller AT-11s were first produced in the late 1930s, and do not look impressive enough to inspire tears. But to the men were trained to be bombardiers in AT-11s at Webb, tears are a necessary response.

The bombardier students in the 1940s released sand-filled bomb casings or cement bombs from the AT-12s down onto nearby ranges. After the bombardiers learned their accuracy lessons well, they were sent to war.

More to see

Five other interesting military planes are on display.

An AT-33 is there. The plane was used for jet fighter pilot training during the Korean War era. Red fuel tanks are stuck way out on its wing tips.

A T-33 is there. Airplanes like it were used for jet pilot training after 1956 and some of the airplanes are still used for military pilot training. Pilots liked to call the twin-engine planes “Tweet” after a famous animated cartoon bird. Many Tweets were assigned to Webb.

The museum’s latest acquisition is a Harrier jet, a strange and frightening looking machine that is capable of taking off and landing vertically. Harriers have been used by the U.S. Armed Services for about 30 years.

The most impressive part of the aircraft collection is a nose section of a B-52 Stratofortress, the heavy, eight-engine bomber. And it is a very long, fat nose indeed. Visitors are allowed to climb up through the crew entrance, sit in the pilot’s seat, play with the controls and pull the stick back. Most wonder how such a machine could possibly fly. But fly they do. B-52s were first deployed in 1955. Analysts say they may still be flying in the year 2045 or so.

The museum acquired the B-52 last August from Goodfellow AFB in San Angelo. Lewis said she has been surprised by the public’s reaction to the aircraft.

“I really wasn’t thrilled to get it and at first I said I wanted to put it outside. But I’ve had to eat my words. This is the most popular thing we’ve got,” she said.

Hangar 25 contains much more than aircraft. Cases are filled with helmets, letters, photographs, uniforms, coffee mugs, a G-suit, hundreds of model airplanes, military shoulder patches, and hundreds of other items donated mostly by the men and women who were assigned to Webb or their families.

“All this equipment! People just bring it in!” Lewis happily exclaimed.

Many display items had just been sitting in storage since the base’s 1977 closing.

One whimsical showcase pokes a little fun at the military bureaucracy. It contains the dozens and dozens of copies of documents that were once required to authorize the retirement of just one former airman.

“We call it our paper trail display,” Lewis said.

The restored hangar’s architecture is another point of interest. Since steel was in short supply during WWII, the building was constructed of brick, wood and glass. A huge folding door covers the hangar’s front. Afternoon light streams through the door’s 100 or so windows and down on to the displays.

A high mezzanine area allows visitors to view the displays from above.

The large interior space is spanned airily by an intricately arranged wooden beamed roof.

Abilene architect Steve Ellinger, who planned the building’s restoration, is an admirer of the building in general and the roof in particular. He calls the arched roof a Lamella roof after the man who designed it. Many like it were built for WWII era hangars.

“To me, it’s still not clear how they built them,” Ellinger said.

Ellinger did his best to preserve all that could be preserved the hangar. He insisted that old stenciled messages on the building interior brick walls not be painted over or sanded away.

“No Coke Drinking,” says one puzzling notice in the hangar’s briefing room. The briefing room is now used as the meeting place for the airport’s board of directors and other community groups. Despite the sign, soft drinks are now permitted.

Hangar 25 is open 9 a.m.-noon and 1-4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Donations are accepted. Call (915) 264-2362 for more information. The museum also maintains a web site at http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Lab/1083/index.html. Hangar 25 also houses the offices of the air park and its manager, Nelda Reagan.1
Activated October 1, 1951 as Big Spring Air Force Base, on the 1300 acre site of the former Big Spring Army Air Field, a World War II Bombardier Training School. Webb was a pilot training base for its entire 25 year life. Initially home of the 346th pilot training Wing (later redesignated the 78th Flying Training Wing), it was first commanded by Colonel Ernest F. Wachwitz as a part of the Flying Training Air Force (later combined with the Technical Training Air Force to become the Air Training Command) The base was renamed May 18,1952 to memorialize Lt. James L. Webb, a Big Spring native and World War II combat pilot, killed in the crash of his P-51 off the Japanese coast in 1949.
For six years prior to its reactivation by the Air Force, the facility served as the Big Spring Municipal Airport. Many of its World War II buildings had been removed or dismantled, so a $3,133,000 construction program was begun to provide the necessary facilities to train jet pilots, including new runway and extensive parking aprons.

In the mid-1960's, avaition cadet status was discontinued by the Air Force, and from then on only student officers were given pilot training. Each year eight classes were normally graduated, entering and leaving at roughly six week intervals.

Webb accepted an additional mission when beginning June 15,1956, the 331st Fighter Interception Squadron was transferred from Stewart AFB, New York. A unit of the 29th Air Division, Air Defense Command, the 331st flew F-102 Delta Daggers on air intercept missions controlled by the 683rd Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron at Avenger Field in Sweetwater, TX.
In February of 1963, the F-102's were exchanged for newer and more power F-104 Starfighters, but the 331st mission of defending the southern U.S. border continued unchanged until March 1967, when it was redesignated the 4760th Combat Crew Training Squadron. Charged then with training Jordanian Air Force students of the F-104, the 4760th was suddenly inactivated when the Jordanians were recalled because of the war with Israel in the summer of 1967. By most standards, Webb was a highly effective base. Not long before its redisignation as the 78th FTW, the 3460th PTW was given the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award for its performance from Jan. 1, 1966 through Dec. 31, 1967. Annual summer training for ROTC cadets from dozens of universities was conducted successfully throughout the 1950's and 1960's.

Base-Community relations were generally excellent, despite a persistent housing shortage and recurring rumors of closure. To demonstrate its cooperation, the City of Big Spring deeded the original base site to the Air Force, and when additional acreage was required for the 331st needs, did not hesitate to obtain more land. Auxiliary landing fields were established at Colorado City and Lamesa, while Howard College which had originally been housed in World War II buildings on former BSAAF land, offered on-base classes for Webb personnel. The community continually pressed to have Webb designated a permanent base.
Chief handicap to its continuation was Webb's location athwart major civilian flyways. Largely because of that location, Webb was the only undergraduate pilot training base of eight (at times 9) in all of Air Training Command which had to maintain base operations (control tower)facilities 24 hours a day. Although there were occasional crashes (some fatal),Webb's safety record compared very favorably with other ATC bases, despite air traffic restrictions.
With the end of war in Vietnam and a decreased need for Air Force pilots, as well as the advent of a Carter administration determined to cut defense expenditures, Webb's days were numbered. Rumors came true in the spring of 1977 with the announcement that the base would be shut down. Last commander of the 78th FTW, Col. Harry A. Spannaus, made his own final flight from Webb AFB in a T-38 Talon on September 2, 1977. Within hours of his flight, the last remaining planes from Webb had been flown to Reese AFB, near Lubbock, TX and other ATC bases. By then, just over 14,000 students had received their silver wings at Webb AFB. The base was formally deactivated on September 30, 1977 and the property was turned over to the Big Spring Industrial Airpark, whose first manager was the newly retired Col. Spannaus. Big Spring Municipal Airport is once more operating there as a component of the airpark, as are the Southwest Collegiate Institute for the Deaf, a federal minimum-security prison camp, and several businesses.2

Citations

  1. [S2210] Internet Site: Abilene Reporter-News Web Site).
  2. [S2209] Internet Site: Webb AFB Web Site).

Hahn AFB

?, #15207
50th Tactical Fighter Wing
Hahn AFB, Germany
Hahn Air Force Base
Front Gate
Hahn Air Force Base
Housing Area
Hahn Air Force Base
Hahn Air Force Base
Front Gate
Hahn Air Force Base
Hahn Air Force Base
Hahn Air Force Base
Hahn Air Force Base
Hahn Air Force Base
Hahn Air Force Base
Hahn Air Force Base
In Town
Hahn Air Force Base
Housing
Hahn Air Force Base
Control Tower
Hahn Air Force Base
Officer's Housing Area
      My personal view of the Hahn Air Base
The Hahn Air Base was part of my life since I was born. I live in Lautzenhausen and so the Hahn Air Base was directly in front of our village. My mother told me, that when I was about two or three years old I ran away crying when a jet flew at a low height over our garden. That must have been my first experience with the Hahn Air Base.
My father started working in the BX about five years before I was born. So I learned some things about „The American Way of Life" very early. My parents had many american friends and many of our relatives were also working on the Base.
Since I was about 8 or 9 I knew the Americans mostly from living in many of the flats or going out in one of the countless pubs and „Gaststätten" in Lautzenhausen. At about the age of 12 or 13 I started to help my father on the Hahn Air Base. So I got on the Base very often. It was like going in a foreign country. I liked being there. I went on the Hahn Air Base very often until it was closed in 1993.
It was a shock when we heard the Air Base will be closed. My father got unemployed but that was not the problem. The problem for me was, that there ended a part of my life. I still miss the „feeling" of being on the Air Base and I often put on my Inline-Skates an drive around the Air Base for some hours.
In December 1997 the Frankfurt Flughafen AG has bought a major part of the Hahn Airport. Since then a lot happened on the Hahn Air Base. Planes are allowed to land on the airport 24h a day. And there is a lot more traffic on the base.
In Winter 1998 the Hahn Airport was rated # 9 of all german airports flying freight world-wide and # 4 (right after Munich) of all german airports transporting freight with all transportation. And there are still new airlines coming to Hahn.

But there is one thing all the companies forget to mention in all speeches: the life that was on the Hahn Air Base and what it meant for our region to have it there. All the success on the Hahn Air Base today can not bring the feeling of the „old" Hahn Air Base with its life and feeling and the wealth for all the people working there or living with the americans in the villages around the Air Base. I can only say, that there is something missing in my life and that there will never be something like that in the future.1
Brief History of Hahn Air Base, Germany (1945-1979)

From 1945 to 1950, the primary mission of the United States military units stationed in the American zone of Germany was occupational. By 1950, however, that concept changed to emphasize the defense of Western Europe. The formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) signalled the buildup of international forces and began with the formation of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) on 2 April 1951.

Prior to the formation of SHAPE, the Soviet Bloc, had initiated an extensive airfield construction program in Eastern Eu.rope during 1948. To meet that threat, the redeployment of U.S. Air Force units to sites west of the Rhine River was desired with a contemplated redeployment area in the French Zone of Germany.

Negotiations with the French to obtain bases in their zone began in 1951. In March of that year, an agreement was reached between the Commanders-in-Chief of the European Command and the French Forces of Occupation in Germany, relating to the stationing of troops, and the exchange of facilities in the French and U.S. zones of Germany.

On 21 March 1951, approximately 1280 acres of land were acquired for an air base near the two small towns of Hahn and Lautzenhausen in the Hunsrück area of Western Germany. These two towns were located about 60 miles west of Wiesbaden, Germany, 50 miles south of Koblenz, Germany, and 50 miles northeast of Trier, Germany. Nearby was the Mozel River, one of the world's most famous wine producing regions.

The base itself was located high on a ridge, 1650 feet above sea level, at a northern latitude approximately even with Labrador. That gave Hahn long winters and short summers with fog usually a part of the scenery throughout the year. Rain, both the hard driving type and drizzle variety, was not an uncommon occurance. In winter, there was considerable snow, and in general the weather picture was like that of the New England states. Hahn was acknowledged as havinq the worst weather in Europe and that required a great deal of instrument flying with little flying during the usual weather minimums in the winter and early spring.

In April 1951, the French "Mission des Grandes Traveaux Aeronautiques" began airfield construction at Hahn and other locations. French construction at Hahn included the 8000 by 150 foot runway, a 50 foot concrete taxiway, 75 dispersal hardstands, alert aprons, two hangar aprons, one hangar, POL (fuel and lubircation) storage facilities for 400,000 gallons, ammunition storage, a ground-controlled-approach hardstand, access and interior roads and wells. All of the flat slab facilities were completed by March 1952, but the POL facilities, ammunition storage, and hangars were not completed until late 1952.

An American inspection team in May 1952, found that "the runway surface is the best of any of the newly constructed airfields in the French zone, even though about half of the runway expansion joints contained structural failures." The team also stated that Hahn Air Base was "considered operational for a wing at the present time."

On 2 June 1952, the American and French Commanders signed another agreement which provided for the transfer of Hahn and other French zone air fields to United States Air Forces in Europe (USAFE) and Twelfth Air Force control.

Preparation for the arrival of American personnel at Hahn began with the construction of 25 prefabricated barracks and other facilities by the 862nd Engineer Battalion (Aviation), while the German firm of Gruen and Bilfinger of Mannheim, Germany, began construction of electric power, water, and sewage facilities.

The 7356th Air Base Squadron was the first United States Air Force unit to arrive at Hahn on 9 September 1952. Base facilities then consisted of pre-fabricated barracks heated by coke-burning pot belly stoves, outdoor latrines, and tents for motorpool personnel to work in. An L-5B was the first aircraft assigned to Hahn and was obtained by the 7356th Air Base Squadron on 16 September 1952 to fill administrative flight requirements.

Also during September 1952 the U.S. phase of construction began. Facilities constructed during that phase included: the control tower; crash and fire-station; warehousing; motor pool; sewage, water, and electrical distribution systems; interior-roads; mess halls; 11, 216-man airmen's barracks; BOQ; three squadron operations buildings; and base accountable and cold storage buildings. Other construction included: the post exchange; auditorium; wing headquarters; air base group headquarters; Officer's Club; jet engine test block; paint and dope shop; perimeter fencing; guardhouse; service club; 75-bed hospital; central heating plant; additional alert apron; parachute building; post office; chapel; photo lab; and three 100 x 140 foot squadron hangars.

With most of that construction completed by mid-1953, the primary mission of Hahn Air Base in 1953 was the reception of the 50th Fighter Bomber Wing. The arrival of the 50th and their F-36F aircraft from Clovis AFB, New Mexico, during August, marked the first mass flight of an entire tactical wing from the U.S. to Continental Europe.

During the next few years, additional construction at Hahn included seven military family housing facilities, five troop facilities, hangars, covered revetments, alert taxiway and other miscellaneous structures.

In 1956, the 50th Fighter Bomber Wing was transferred to Toul-Rosieres Air Base, France, and the 7425th Air Base Group became the "parent" organization at Hahn, providing support for the 36th Fighter Day Wing, 496th Fighter Interceptor Squadron and Headquarters, 38th Tactical Missile Wing.

In August 1959, a few months prior to the return of the 50th (redesignated the 50th Tactical Fighter Wing on 8 July 1958), Headquarters 38th Tactical Missile Wing was moved to Sembach AB, Germany. Also, during the same period, the 461st Tactical Fighter Squadron, a component of the 36th Tactical Fighter Wing was inactivated, and the 7425th Combat Support Group was discontinued and renamed the 50th Air Base Group. On 15 November 1959, the USAFE command structure was realigned and Seventeenth Air Force, after its move from North Africa to Germany, took control of Hahn.

The return of the 50th TFW from France in December 1959 included the 10th and 81st Tactical Fighter Squadrons.

Operating Location Number 1 of the 50th TFW was completed and occupied on 13 February 1960. That area was the first in USAFE to be built specifically to house the Victor Alert capability. Also, during 1960, an asphalt overlay of 4.7 inches was added to the existing runway.

In 1961, Hahn organizations were directed by higher headquarters to implement the Dual-Deputy type of organizational strucutre prior to May 1962. That system was begun in USAFE to standardize its tactical units, by relieving the Wing Commander of many administrative details and insuring that the Deputy Commander for Operations and the Deputy Commander for Material were given more control over their specific functions.

On 9 April 1962, the Tactical Air Command rotational squadron, the 476th Tactical Fighter Squadron, arrived at Hahn and returned to George AFB, California, its home base, on 8 August 1962.

During the Cuban Missile Crisis, which began 22 October 1962, the 435th Tactical Fighter Squadron deployed from Moron AB, Spain, to Hahn. Although the crisis officially ended 26 November 1962, the 435th TFS did not return to Moron until 11 December 1962.

In 1963, Detachment 5 of the Atlantic Air Rescue Center moved to Hahn with three H-43B helicopters to conduct rescue operations within a 75 mile radius of the base.

Between 1965 and 1966 Hahn witnessed the phaseout of the local detachment of the 38th Tactical Missile Wing, and preparations for conversion from F-100 to F-4D aircraft. As a result of the aircraft conversion, Hahn and the 50th TFW found its three tactical squadrons relieved of their Victor Alert commitments for the first time since 1959.

On 1 January 1967, Detachment 31, 7232nd Munitions Maintenance Squadron was assigned to the 50th TFW, and on 11 March the base received its first F-4 aircraft.

During 1968, the 417th Tactical Fighter Squadron at Hahn was redeployed to Mountain Home AFB, Idaho, as part of project CRESTED CAP. That project provided for the redeployment of specified U.S. European Air Force units to the United States on a semi-permanent basis. Those units involved, however, were to remain an integral part of their respective USAFE "parent" wings, while operating under the temporary control of the CONUS wings to which they were assigned. Not long after leaving Europe, the 417th returned to Hahn in January 1969 to participate in Exercise CRESTED CAP I, the first in a series of exercises designed to test the mobility of NATO-committed fighter squadrons based in the U.S. under simulated wartime conditions. Since that time, Hahn Air Base has hosted CRESTED CAP Exercises in 1970, 1971, and 1973 - 1976 (a total of seven).

Also during 1968, the 496th Fighter Interceptor Squadron was officially assigned to the 50th TFW under a reorganization that officially dissolved the 86th Air Division -- the 496th's former parent unit. In 1970, the 496th exchanged its F-102 aircraft for F-4E aircraft and was redesignated as a Tactical Fighter Squadron while retaining its Air Defense mission.

During the period July through December 1969, the 8lst Tactical Fighter Squadron began training for its newly assigned mission as the first „Wild Weasel" unit in USAFE. The 81st later deployed to Zweibrücken AB, Germany, on a permanent basis in June 1971.

From April through August 1970 (until 1 August), the Hahn runway was closed for repairs and upgrading. During that period, the three tactical squadrons of the 50th TFW deployed to dispersed operating locations. Also, during the month of June 1970, Hahn became host to C Battery, 7th Battalion, Chaparral (SP)/Vulcan (T), 61st Artillery, 32nd Army Air Defense Command, which arrivred to provide air defense for the base and the wing against low-level enemy attack aircraft.

As mentioned earlier, the big event for Hahn AB during 1971 was the deployment of the 81st TFS to Zweibrücken AB, Germany, where that unit was permanently assigned to the 86th Tactical Fighter Wing.

During 1972, Hahn's primary operational unit, the 50th TFW was the recipient of the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award. In addition, the base support one of the largest munitions logistics operations ever undertaken before by an USAFE unit of comparable size. That operation was undertaken by the 7236th Ammunition Supply Squadron, and involved the renovation and exchange of bombs.

Beginning in July 1972, the 50th TFW at Hahn was one of the two USAFE wings to test the Wing Reorganization Test Program that was eventually adopted command-wide in July 1974. Under that reorganization, the Chief of Maintenance was made a Deputy Commander position and the Transportation Squadron, Comptroller and Procurement functions were reassigned from the Combat Support Group to the Deputy Commander for Logistics.

During 1973 and 1974, things were relatively quiet as Hahn continued as the home base for the 50th TFW and its assigned units. In 1975, however, the year was highlighted at Hahn by the establishment of a laser guided bomb capability by the 10th TFS, the European Test and Evaluation (ET&E) of the Maverick Missile System, and the deployment of seven F-106 aircraft from the Air Defense Command's 5th FIS at Minot AFB, North Dakota, to Hahn to participate in Exercise COLD FIRE 75 (the first time an ADC unit deployed to USAFE). Also in July 1975, Hahn received an additional unit to support when the 6911th Security Squadron (Mobile) started operations.

Activities for 1976 and 1977 included an aircraft realignment throughout USAFE that resulted in Hahn losing all the F-4Ds that were assigned to the 50th TFW. Those D-models were, however, replaced by newer and in some cases, brand new F-4Es. Included in that realignment, Hahn gained another flying unit and additional aircraft as the 313th TFS was activated and assigned to the 50th effective 15 November 1976. In addition to those aircraft movements and that squadron activation which were all directed by CREEK REALIGN II guidelines, beginning 10 January 1977, Hahn became the site of a test of USAFE's version of the Production Oriented Maintenance Organization (POMO) -- the Tactical Air Force Aircraft Maintenance Svstem (TAMS). New facilities added during 1976 and 1977 included a main base exchange and an 18-lane bowling center as well as additions to the base's Junior High School that allowed it to become accredited and be used for Senior High School classes. Additionally during 1977, Hahn became the site for USAFE's first contingency launch/recovery runway with its completion during December.

In 1978 (in the article about the 'Salty Rooster' exercise it's 1977), the TAMS test continued at Hahn and during April, Salty ROOSTER a Hq USAF initiated high sortie rate exercise was held primarily to determine the new maintenance structure's ability to produce sorties at wartime levels. For that exercise, approximately 300 augmentees from the Air Training Command (ATC) and others from various USAFE bases, came to Hahn. After the exercise 13 consecutive flying days, an impressive 2771 sorties had been logged and all planned objectives had been surpassed. As a result of Salty ROOSTER and the findings of the TAMS test at Hahn, the CINCUSAFE made the decision to adopt the POMO structure throughout the command and the TAMS test was concluded at Hahn during June.

Toward the end of 1978 Hahn was again affected by a USAFE-wide aircraft realignment. Although not involving the transfer of a large number of aircraft, the moves made resulted in Hahn's primary unit, the 50th TFW, being composed of two squadrons of PAVE SPIKE laser guidance/Maverick missile capable F-4Es and one squadron of TISEO (Target Identification System Electro-Optical)/Maverick F-4Es by early 1979. Since Hahn was selected as one of four bases for the ET&E of the General Dynamics' F-16 all-weather multi-role aircraft, the base had to host three F-16s and the associated support personnel during April and My 1979. Significant facility projects during 1978 included the completion of the High School Sports Field in September 1978 and the renovation of the Galaxy Inn Dining Hall during October. Major projects in progress during 1979 were comprised of the renovation of the NCO Club and the start of Hahn's Build/Lease Housing Project. The latter involved the construction of 300 housing units (both two and four bedroom) in three towns near Hahn.

Remark: The wing histories identify the wing rather than the combat support group as the base operating unit as of this date. Unless otherwise indicated, all installations are located in the Federal Republic of Germany.

Taken from: Harry R. Fletcher, Air Force Bases Vol. II, Air Bases outside the United States of America, Center for Air Force History, Washington D.C.1
Base Commander: Col Forrest L. Rauscher June 28, 1968 - June 13, 1969.2
50th Tactical Fighter Wing History

The 50th Tactical Fighter Wing was originally constituted in 1940 and activated on January 15, 1941, as the 50th Pursuit Group(Interceptor)at Selfridge Field, Michigan. During the war years, the wing took part in the aerial invasion of Normandy on June 6-7, 1944, and was awarded two Distinguished Unit Citations and five Battle Honors for its participation during the air war over Central Europe. After World WarII, the wing returned to the United States and was inactivated in 1945. Shortly after the formation of NATO in 1951, the construction of Hahn Air Base began. Negotiation with the French to obtain bases in their zone of occupation began in 1951 and approximately 1,280 acres of land were acquired for the construction of what is now Hahn Air Base. The 7356th Air Base Squadron was the first US Air Force unit to arrive at Hahn AB in Spetember 1952. It was their task to prepare the base to receive the 50th Fighter Bomber Wing (redesignated the 50th Tactical Fighter Wing July 8, 1958). On January 1,1953, the 50th Fighter Bomber Wing was activated and assigned to Tactical Air Command. In August of that same year, the wing officially moved from Clovis AFB, NM, to Hahn AB, Germany, with F-86 Sabrejets. The assigned aircraft squadrons which accompanied the wing were the 10th, 81st and 417th Fighter Bomber Squadrons. In 1956, the wing moved to Toul Rosieres AB, France. The 7425th AB Group held responsibility for Hahn AB and provided support for the 461st Fighter Day Squadron, 496th Fighter Interceptor Squadron and Headquaters 38th Tactical Missile Wing. During 1956, the 461st, a component of the 36th TFW, was incativated ab´nd the 7425th Group was renamed the 50th AB Group. During 1857-58, the wing converted to F-100 aircraft in addition to remaining in readiness condition during the Lebanon crisis. It was not until September 1959 that the wing returned to Hahn AB from France with the 10th and 81st TFSs. Between 1965 and 1966, Hahn witnessed the phaseout of the local detachment of the 38th TMW and preparations for conversion from F-100 to F-4D aircraft. During 1968, the 417th TFS assigned to the 50th TFW and stationed at Ramstein AB was redeployed to Mountain Home AFB, ID, as part of project CRESTED CAP. That project provided for the redeployment of specified US European Air Force units to the United States on a semi-permanent basis. Not long after leaving Europe, the 417th returned to Hahn in January 1969 to participate in excercise CRESTED CAP I, the first in a series of excercises designed to test the mobility of NATO committed fighter squadrons based in the United States under simulated wartime conditions. Also during 1968, the 496th FIS, stationed at Hahn AB since 1956, was officially assigned to the wing. In 1970, the 496th exchanged its F-102 aircraft for F-4E aircraft and was redesignated as a Tactical Fighter Squadron while retaining its Air Defense Mission. Acticities for 1976 and 1977 included an aircraft realignment throughout USAFE that resulted in Hahn losing all the F-4Ds that were assigned to the 50th TFW. Those D-Models were, however, replaced by F-4E. Hahn gained another flying unit and additional aircraft as the 313th TFS was activated and assigned to the 50th effective November 15, 1976. In addition, beginning January 10, 1977, Hahn became the site of a USAFE´s version of the Production Oriented Maintenance Organization - the Tactical Air Force Aircraft Maintenance System. In 1980, the wing was selected to the the first USAFE wing to receive F-16 Fighting Falcons, replacing the F-4E Phanton II. The first F-16 operational aircraft arrived at the 50th TFW on December 30, 1981, and was assigned to the 313th TFS. In June 1982, the 313th passed its Limited Operational Readiness Inspection and became the first F-16 mission-ready fighter squadron in USAFE. Hahn said good-bye to the F-4 Phantom at the end of June and officially welcomed the USAFE F-16s to NATO during a ceremony July 9. 1982. In September 1982 all fighter sqaudrons were deployed to Spain or Ramstein AB to prepare for the installation of the BAK-14 arresting barrier. The project was completed in October, when an F-4 from Spangdahlem AB successfully encountered the barrier. In July 1983, the 50th TFW, after two long years of transitional status, passed its NATO Tactical Evaluation and became fully mission-capable flying the F-16. In October 1983, the wing participated in Gunsmoke ´83 - the biennial Air Force-wide tactical gunnery and bombing competition at Nellis AFB, NV. The 50th TFW swept the competition, walking away as overall winners, took first place in the 30-degree dive bomb area, and first and second place in the 200-foot level bomb category. A Hahn pilot came in second for the Top Gun Award ( Capt. Ed "Furball" Furtado, 313th TFS ) and the 50th munitions load crew placed third overall in the loadeo contest. The wing received notification in March 1984 that it had received the Air Force Oustanding Unit Award. The 50th also ste an Air Force record at the Rapid Runway Repai Olympics at Ramstein AB, Germany, in March 1984, with a time of 11 minutes and 24 seconds. In 1985 and 1986, the 313th TFS was presented the USAFE Commander-in- Chief trophy as the command´s most outstanding flying squadron in the previous year, being the first squadron ever to receive this award twwo years in a row. During October 1985, the wing nearly repeated the previous Gunsmoke triumph at Gunsmoke ´85 , solidly taking second place only two points behind the winner. The 50th TFW also captured the overall Top Gun Award ( Capt. Mark "Fredhog" Fredenburgh, 313th TFS ). In 1986 and 1987, the 50th TFW´s maintenance complex was selected as the winner of the USAF Daedalian Maintenance Award and received the Department of Defense Phoenix Award for 1986. The wing was again selected to receive the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award for the period of July 1, 1985 through June 1, 1987. Early in 1987, the 50th TFW completed its transition to the F-16C/D models. In the late 80s, wing personnel continued to train and perform in an outstanding manner during Local Salty Nation, local Nuclear Surety and Major Accident Response Excercises. Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm put that training to the test. In December 1990, the 10th TFS and the 10th Aircraft Maintenance Unit deployed to the Persian Gulf. These members of the 50th TFW played a vital role in the successful campaign to liberate Kuwait. The squadron remained deployed to support Operation Provide Comfort. Members of the 10th TFS began to return to Hahn AB in May 1991. Many other Hahn personnel also deployed to support Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Proven Force and Provide Comfort. Those who remained at Hahn also played important roles in support of the Gulf conflict.1
About Hahn, The 50th and K-9!

Hahn Air Base was located near Koblenz in the Hunsruck region of Rheinland-Platz between the Rhine, Mosel and Nahe Rivers in West Germany. Built by the French, for US Forces, the base, about 1,280 acres, was situated between the towns of Hahn (which the base was named after) and Lautzenhausen (located just outside the front gate). Hahn AB actually lied on either side of a pre-WW2 strategic highway called the Hunsrückhohenstrasse - literally translated, it means, "the high road along the Hound's backbone!"

Construction was started April, 1951 and turned over on June 2, 1952 to the 862th Engineering Bn., who began construction of prefabricated barracks. The 7356th ABSq. moved in on September 9, 1952 and began the final US phase of construction. It was more or less completed in time for the arrival in August 1953 of the 50th FBWg. from Clovis, New Mexico. The arrival of pilots and aircraft from the United States marked the first mass flight of an entire tactical wing from the U.S. to Europe - a historic step in the history of the Air Force.

The base was built high on a ridge, 1,650 feet above sea level, at a northern latitude approx even with Labrador, which accounted for it having the worst weather of any air base in europe. We had very long, long winters and very short summers. It snowed alot, rained alot, then snowed and rained some more! Some said the weather was similar to New England. I disagree, I was born and raised a New Englander and I always thought Hahn's weather made New England seem darn right tropical.

In addition to the normal base aircraft in the sixties, the 50th Wing's primary aircraft were the F-100 Super Sabre. The 496th FIS utilized the F-102 Delta Dagger, while the primary weapons system maintained by the 38th missile squadrons were the TM 76A Mace Missile. Also at Hahn Air Base, in operation under Det. 5, AARC, was the H43B Husky Helicopter.

Within USAFE, the 50th Tactical Fighter Wing formed part of the 17th Air Force, headquartered at Sembach Air Base, Germany, but in common with the other NATO assigned forces of the l7th AF, command of the Wing, would have been transferred to the Alliance's Fourth Allied Tactical Air Force in a time of crisis, and once a certain state of alert had been reached.


HAHN'S MAJOR UNITS, 1961

Hahn Air Base was the home of the 50th Tactical Fighter Wing, the parent unit on the base. Three key units came under the 50th Wing Commander; the Deputy Commander for Operations, the Deputy Commander for Material and the 50th Combat Support Group.

Under Operations were such activities as Operation Plans, Control and Training. Standardization and Evaluation and Intelligence, as well as the 10th, 81st and 417th Tactical Fighter Squadrons. The 10th and 81st were stationed at Hahn Air Base, while the 417th Tac. Fighter Squadron was located at Ramstein.

Under the Material branch were two subdivisions, Chief of Supply and Chief of Maintenance. The Supply Squadron, BEMO, BASO and FUSO came under the Chief of Supply, while the Chief of Maintenance controlled the A and E, Field Munitions, Organizational and Fightline Maintenance Squadrons.

Squadrons within the 50th Combat Support Grp included the Headquarters Squadron, Civil Engineers, The 50th Air Police and Transportation. In addition the Personnel Div, Services Div, Comptroller Div, Operation and Training Div, Administrative Service Div, Manpower & Organization Div., and the Procurement Divisions, all came under the 50th Combat Support Commander.

The Surgeon (also commander of the 50th Tac. Hospital), the Staff Judge Advocate, the Chaplain, Safety Officer and Information Officer were all members of the Wing CO's staff.

In addition to Hahn's home units, the Wing also provided specified maintenance, supply and housekeeping support to attached and tenant units. Among the largest of these units were the 89th and 405th Tactical Missile Squadrons and the 586th Missile Maintenance Squadron, all units of Sembach AFB based 38th Missile Wing; the 496th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, a squadron of the Ramstein AFB based 86th Air Division and the 2184th Communication Squadron.3
Hahn's History

The Why!
From 1945 to 1950, the primary mission of the United States military units stationed in the American zone of Germany was occupational. By 1950, however, that concept changed to emphasize the defense of Western Europe. The formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) signailed the buildup of international forces and began with the formation of Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe (SHAPE) on April 2, 1951.
Prior to the formation of SHAPE, the Soviet Bloc, had initiated an extensive airfield construction program in Eastern Europe during 1948. To meet that threat, the redeployment of U.S. Air Force units to sites west of the Rhine River was desired with a contemplated redeployment area in the French Zone of Germany.
Negotiations with the French to obtain bases in their zone began in 1951. In March of that year, an agreement was reached between the Commanders In Chief of the European Command and the French Forces of Occupation in Germany, relating to the stationing of troops and the exchange of facilities in the French and U.S. zones of Germany.
On March 21, 1951, approximately 1,280 acres of land were acquired for an air base near the two small towns of Hahn and Lautzenhausen in the Hunsruck area of West Germany. The land, mostly woods and farm land, was located on a ridge, about 1,650 feet above sea level, at a northern latitude approx even with Labrador; and was about 60 miles west of Wiesbaden, 50 miles south of Koblenz and 50 miles northeast of Trier.

The Beginning!
In April 1951, the French "Mission des Grandes Traveaux Aeronautiques" began airfield construction: a 8,000 by 150 foot runway, a 50 foot concrete taxiway, 75 dispersal hard stands, alert aprons, two hangar aprons, one hangar, POL (fuel and lubrication) storage facilities for 400,000 gallons, ammunition storage, a ground controlled approach hardstand, access and interior roads and wells. All of the flat slab facilities were completed by March 1952, but the POL facilities, ammo storage and hangars were not completed until late 1952.
An American inspection team in May 1952, found that the "runway surface is the best of any of the newly constructed airfields in the French Zone, even though about half of the runway expansion joints contained structional failures." The team also stated that Hahn AB was "considered operational for a wing at the present time."
On June 2, 1952, the American and French Commanders signed another agreement which provided for the transfer of Hahn and other French zone air fields to United States Air Forces in Europe (USAFE) and 12th Air Force control.
Preparation for the arrival of American personnel at Hahn began with the construction of 25 prefabricated barracks and other facilities by the 862nd Engineer Battalion (Aviation), while the German firm of Gruen & Bilfinger of Mannheim, Germany, began construction of electric power, water and sewage facilities.
The 7356th Air Base Squadron was the first United States Air Force unit to arrive at Hahn on September 9, 1952. Base facilities then consisted of pre-fabricated barracks heated by coke burning pot belly stoves, outdoor latrines, and tents for motorpool personnel to work in.
An L-5B was the first aircraft assigned to Hahn Air Base and was obtained by the 7356th Air Base Squadron on September 16, 1952 to fill administrative flight requirements.
Also during September 1952, the U.S. phase of construction began. Facilities constructed during that phase included: the control tower and crash and fire station.
Warehousing, motor pool, sewage, water and electrical distribution systems; interior roads, mess halls, 11, 216 airmen's barracks, BOQ, three squadron operations buildings and base accountable and cold storage buildings.

Historical Background
The 50th Civil Engineer Squadron was activated as the 50th Installations Squadron on Jan. 1, 1953, and assigned to the 50th Air Base Group.
Stationed at Clovis Air Force Base, N.M., the squadron, with other units of the 50th Fighter Wing, immediately began preparing for movement to Hahn Air Base, Germany, in response to a Soviet buildup of air combat forces in Eastern Europe. The units of the 50th Wing remained at Clovis for only a few months, departing for Germany in late July 1953.
Upon arriving at Hahn Air Base, the 50th Civil Engineering Squadron took over management of continuing construction activities associated with the beddown of the 50th Tactical Fighter Wing.
While the French had completed some facilities, the 50th's engineers oversaw construction of the base's control tower, fire station, warehouses, roads, mess halls and dormitories, as well as operations and headquarters facilities.
For the next 38 years, the men and women of the 50th Civil Engineering Squadron supported Hahn Air Base and the 50th Tactical Fighter Wing with necessary facilities, infrastructure maintenance and repair, fire protection and a host of other activities.
Additionally, the squadron provided the wing, U.S. Air Forces in Europe and NATO with combat-ready forces needed to perform rapid runway repair and other PRIME Base Engineer Emergency Force services.
In its 38-year history at Hahn Air Base, the unit earned seven Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards and participated in countless exercises, evaluations and deployments, including Desert Shield - Desert Storm.
Inactivated with the 50th Tactical Fighter Wing Sept. 30, 1991.


50th FBW F-86 Sabres, 1953!
With most of that construction completed by mid 1953, the primary mission of Hahn Air Base in 1953 was the reception of the 50th Fighter Bomber Wing. The arrival of the 50th and their F-86F aircraft from Clovis AFB, New Mexico, during August, marked the first mass flight of an entire tactical wing from the United States to Continental Europe.
During the next few years, additional construction at Hahn included seven military family housing facilities, five troop facilities, hangars, covered revetments, alert taxiway and other miscellaneous structures.
Operating Location Number 1 (Victor Alert Area) of the 50th TFW was completed and occupied on February 13, 1960. That area was the first in USAFE to be built specifically to house the Victor Alert capability. Also, during 1960, an asphalt overlay of 4.7 inches was added to the existing runway.
New facilities added during 1976 and 1977 included a main base exchange and an 18-lane bowling center as well as additions to the base's Junior High School that allowed it to become accredited and be used for Senior High School classes. Additionally during 1977, Hahn became the site for USAFE's first contingency launch / recovery runway with its completion during December.
Significant facility project during 1978 included the completion of the High School Sports Field in September 1978 and the renovation of the Galaxy Inn Dining Hall during October. Major projects in progress during 1979 were comprised of the renovation of the NCO Club and the start of Hahn's Build - Lease Housing Project. The latter involved the construction of 300 housing units (both two and four bedrooms) in three towns near Hahn.
The United States Air Force investment continued throughout the life of the base. For instance, the huge commissary, the base chapel, and parts of the high school were built in the 1980's, the new kindergarten was completed in 1990 and the new Burger King Restaurant was only open for several months before the base closed.3
Hahn Air Base, 1953 - 1991

50th Tactical Fighter Wing

The following is an article that appeared July 19, 1991, by Colonel Dana Duthie, 50th TFW Deputy Commander of Operations, in the base newspaper, The Hahn Hawk.

finis

Fighter Squadrons Close Shop, One-By-One.
As the sun slowly sets over the Stipshausen hill, the shadows grow long over Hahn. The 50th TFW in its twilight has been a gray, sombering experience. In a few short months, Hahn has gone from a full up operation with three triple tasked F-16 squadrons to a small support base and no flying operations at all.

The demise of the 50th TFW and its three fighter squadrons has not been fun. How quickly we forget the glorious past when a wing goes down.

Watching this from the inside has been an eye-opening experience. The history of the 50th TFW and the 10th, 313th and 496th Tactical Fighter Squadrons has been as colorful as any in the Air Force. The three squadrons are rich with tradition...the walls abound with historical parafanalia that only ghosts of the past can truly explain. Fighter pilots from long ago still sit around and talk of "the good old days".

As we clean out desk drawers and closets, we find photo albums, plaques and trophies portraying these heroes as valiant warriors, true to their squadron and the 50th TFW. But, alas our time has come. With one fell stroke of the pen and presumably well thought out decisions, the 50th TFW and its three fighter squadrons are history. Inactivation! This is supposedly a temporary term (as opposed to DEactivation), giving the Air Force the capability to bring them out of the closet at a future date.

So one at a time, the squadrons have folded. The 496th TFS went out quietly in March because we still could not go public with this grand obituary. LtCol. Bill Harrell, 496th TFS Commander, held a quiet, informal ceremony in his empty building on an appropriate day - the Ides of March. The "Big Dogs" had long since gone to join the 10th at Desert Storm or helped fill out the 313th. A proud and unusual group of men and women who once were the "Big Dog Nation", were reduced to memories.

Next came the "Lucky Puppies" of the 313th TFS. A relatively young squadron to the wing with respect to Hahn and the 50th TFW, the 313th reactivated in 1976. The "Pups" established a reputation for excellence amd "Firsts" early on. For most of 1991, LtCol. Hymie Oram´s squadron has been the only show in town supporting all of the local flying. That in itself was an awesome task - it´s not easy having to support three colonels and an occasional major general´s flying habits. Protocol becomes an every day affair. No one ever did it better. Colonel Hymie and Cindi Oram are a "touch of class" and where the 313th suffered in continuity, they more than made up for in style. Once again, however, the final "Puppy Chow" had to be incognito- for on April 26, we still could not come out of the closet with our demise.

Now it is the Sabres´ turn. The 10th TFS finally returned from Desert Storm to a rousing welcome May 9 and 10- only to find an assignment for each and every one of them. The pilots all knew of their next job even before they returned and although their recent past was colored with combat and glory, their future was on most of their minds. Before the squadron could even get back to business in the skies of Germany, they had to first plan a change of command- albeit for a tenure of just a few months. LtCol. Ed Houle, 10th TFS Commander, has departed as a true warrior and great leader of men and many of us believe we´ll all be working for him again in the future. LtCol. Steve Wood has stepped up to a tough and sad mission, and he is demonstrating an organization and leadership capacity that will serve him well. To close out the wing´s flying mission, while requalifying the 10th pilots in events they had not flown in months, was not easy. The weather man helped out and the Sabres go out as current and ready as they had ever been.

Very soon, the only sound of jet noise over Hahn will be Spangdahlem, Ramstein and other fighters taking a short cut home. When you look up and see them go by, remember that´s the second team. The first team has been temporarily sidelined.

As I finish this article that was started in April, I look back on an event-packed year. I arrived here as the deputy for operations one year ago- ready to help convert the wing to Block 40 F-16 LANTIRN system. In that year we stopped the conversion, took a Nuclear Surety Inspection, a CFE Treaty inspection and have almost completely inactivated the operation. Oh, by the way, we went to war, too! My reflections of the year are not the prettiest, but certainly, the busiest of my career. But, my reflections of Hahn will always be special. I have spent almost 5 1/2 years here over a 23 year career- nearly one quarter of my Air Force life. I will always remember the lousy weather and the beautiful countryside, the harrowing roads and our wonderful German hosts, the awesome mission and the fantastic people. The people! The guts of Hahn! My fondest memories will always be my time with all of you. Thanks!

Take A Final Look...It's Time To Say Goodbye!

Note: The United States Air Force returned Hahn Air Base to the German Government by the end of 1991, only several months after this article was written. The air field is now a thriving commercial airport, operating 24-hours per day. The former base housing area is a training school for the National German Police Force; other base buildings, are now homes to various commercial businesses. The weather is still the same ...lousy! Somethings never change.

Appendix, Page 16a: BICC-4 Report on Restructing Military Bases in West Germany - Hahn AB, Page 16a (click below right).3
Alerts at Hahn During The Sixties
It has been said that those who can remember the sixties weren't really there. But for those who can recall those early years...the sixties began with a presidential hopeful, Jack Kennedy and ended when Richard Nixon began troop withdrawals from Vietnam.

In between, a U2 was downed over Russia...which halted a summit conference in Vienna, a wall was built in Berlin and seen a 16-hour confronation between Soviet and American tanks, Nikita Khrushchev banged his shoe at the United Nations and promise that the Soviets "would bury" us. Kennedy started the Peace Corp and increased the number of military advisors in Laos and Vietnam.

Early into 1961, America sent the first chimp into space. In April, the Russians won the race to put a man into space when 27-year-old Yuri Gagarin orbited the Earth in a Vostok spacecraft. America countered the Russian response with two 15-minute space hops, the first by Alan Shepard. By August, the Russians had orbited the earth 17 times in a manned shot lasting over 25 hours. Later, the Minuteman, America's first three-stage Inter-continental Ballistic Missile, was tested successfully. Now both of the superpowers were in a position to annihilate each other - along with the rest of the northern hemisphere.

By 1962, the Cuban missile crisis for seven days, kept the world on the brink of a nuclear war. Only when fourteen thousand USAF reservists were called up, did the Soviets backed off and said they would dismantle the missile sites if America withdrew its bases in Turkey. On October 28, an agreement to that effect was signed, Nuclear holocaust had been averted by a hair breadth.

All of the above is hindsight, wonderful thing...hindsight, because at the time we knew nothing about what was happening in the 'real world'. Chubby Checker was teaching the world how to 'twist' and believe me, we were 'twisting the night away' in Lautzenhausen. Were we dumb? I don't think so, we were in the military and the military lets you know what you 'NEED TO KNOW' and nothing more! So, we had our ALERTS, sometimes for a reason...sometimes just for 'fun'. All I know is...they always seen to happen just after getting off duty or when the weather was real lousy!

There Was A War...It Ended With Silence!
There was a war...
With real casualties. Real people died! Though most often it was clandestine and subtle, it ranged worldwide, cost many lives, evoked much heroism and lasted what seemed like for ever.
There was a war...
It was America's longest war, and no it wasn't Vietnam! There were to be no medals...or battle steamers! There were no victory parades. There are no momuments or museums built, no special day designated to mark the victory and to honor the sacrifices made by Americans to achieve it, it did not rate even fireworks.
There was a war...
The Americans who fought it... patrolled barbed-wire borders, flew secret reconnaissance flights in hostile skies, stood alone guarding flightlines and missile sites, sailed submarines in the oceans depths and manned remote communications stations in desolate locations, served in vital roles.
There was a war...
The theatre of operations, were located in West Germany, the borders of Turkey, Greenland, Iceland, Finland, and even in Iran, the DMZ Zone of Korea, the islands of Okinawa and the Philippines, the global skies and here...in the United States!
There was a war...
It was a struggle against the Soviet Union and international communisms...and we won!
There was a war...
And as Senator P. Gramm recently said: "The brave men and women, who served America in the military between the begin- ning of the Cold War and the fall of the Berlin Wall, won a big victory, that brought more freedom to more people world wide than any other military victory in the history of mankind."
There was a war...
Won by "Cold War Warriors"..."Peace Time Veterans"...and we salute them all.

How Close Did We Ever Come To...'THE BIG ONE'.

Here's Several Mishaps That Might Have Started A Accidental Nuclear War.

My Favorite Story!

1956, Nov. 5: Suez Crisis Coincidence!
British and French forces were attacking Egypt at the Suez Canal. The Soviet Government had suggested to U.S. that they combine forces to stop this by a joint military action, and had warned the British and French governments that (non-nuclear) rocket attacks on London and Paris were being considered. That night the U.S. military HQ in Europe received messages that:

(i) Unidentified aircraft were flying over Turkey and the Turkish Air Force was on alert.

(ii) 100 Soviet MIG-15's were flying over Syria.

(iii) A British Canberra bomber had been shot down over Syria.

(iv) The Russian fleet was moving through the Dardanelles. It is reported that in U.S.A. General Goodpaster himself was concerned that these events might trigger the NATO operations plan for nuclear strikes against U.S.S.R.

The 4 reports were all shown afterwards to have innocent explanations. They were due, respectively, to:

(i) A flight of swans.

(ii) A routine air force escort (much smaller than the number reported) for the president of Syria, who was returning from a visit to Moscow.

(iii) The Canberra bomber was forced down by mechanical problems.

(iv) The Russian fleet was engaged in scheduled routine exercises.


1962, Oct. 22: Cuban Missile Crisis

President Kennedy Wasn't The Only One With His Finger On The Button.

It is recorded in British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan B9s diary for 22 October that in order to avoid provocation of U.S.S.R., he and the NATO Supreme Commander, General Lauris Norstad, agreed not to put NATO On alert. When the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff ordered DEFCON 3 Norstad was authorized to use his discretion in complying. Norstad therefore did not order a NATO alert. However, several NATO subordinate commanders did order alerts to DEFCON 3 or equivalent levels of readiness at bases in West Germany, Italy, Turkey, and Britain. This seems to have been largely due to the action of General Truman Landon, CINC U.S. Air Forces Europe, who had already started alert procedures on 17 October in anticipation of a serious crisis over Cuba.

SiteBuilder Note: Hahn was one of the bases in West Germany that went on alert. It was about 3:30 a.m. that the alert horns sounded and for the first time ever, I heard the voice over the PA say, "This is a real alert", repeat, "This is a real alert"!

After that, all you heard were locker doors being slammed shut, as everyone quickly dressed...no yelling...no grumbling! Automatically we all ran to the weapons room, not knowing what was going on...it was the fastest response to a alert ever!

Even as we loaded into the trucks, you could see and hear some of the planes lifting off for their targets. And you knew, that 'the other side' was doing the same thing...we were their target or so we though.

I've forgotten how long we were all out there, some of us on the flightline, Area 5, others at Zulu Alert or Victor Alert with their planes warming up, waiting for the 'word' to spin the mountains of Eastern Europe into glass. The base was a bee hive of activity, everyone doing what they were trained to...all for the 'base mission'...get the planes loaded and up, get them off the ground!

Eventually, the planes started to come back and the 'all clear' sounded...we stood down, still not knowing what had just happened...not until days later, did we hear all about it on the Armed Forces radio/TV news. By then, we were all part of history...the closest that this country has ever come to a nuclear war!

1965, Nov.: Power Failure And Fauty Bomb Alarms

Special bomb alarms were installed near military facilities and near cities in U.S.A. so that the locations of nuclear bursts would be transmitted before the expected communication failure. The alarm circuits were set up to display a red signal at command posts the instant that the flash of a nuclear detonation reached the sensor and before the blast could put it out of action. Normally the display would show a green signal, and yellow if the sensor was not operating or was out of communication for any other reason.

During the commercial power failure in the North East United States in November 1965, displays from all the bomb alarms for the area should have shown yellow. In fact two of them from different cities showed red because of circuit errors. The effect was consistent with the power failure being due to nuclear weapon explosions, and the Command Center of the Office of Emergency Planning went on full alert. Apparently the military did not.3

Citations

  1. [S2212] Internet Site: Marks Hahn AFB Homepage).
  2. [S2213] Internet Site: Hahn AFB, 50th Tactical Fighter Wing Web Site).
  3. [S2211] Internet Site: History of Hahn AFB).

Lackland AFB

?, #15208
Lackland Air Force Base
Lackland Air Force Base
Lackland Air Force Base
Lackland Air Force Base
Lackland Air Force Base
      Lackland Air Force Base was established on June 26, 1942, when the War Department separated part of Kelly Field and names it San Antonio Aviation Cadet Center (SAACC) to support the war effort.

From its inception, SAACC witnessed rapid growth and transitioned from a former field training and bombing range through a variety of missions: the hub for flying training, site for the officer training and commissioning orientation, a staging area for all veterans returning from WWII for reassignment or separation, and eventually, established as the basic military training center for officers and enlisted personnel entering the Army Air Forces.

Unfortunately, the acronym SAACC ("sack-c") evolved into the less affectionate name of "sad sack" which underscored the makeshift and haphazard configuration of the base. Coupled with numerous name changes, a significant identity crisis emerged for base personnel.

Fortunately the base's downhill reputation was checked in 1947 when it was renamed Lackland Air Force Base in honor of Brigadier General Frank D. Lackland. Brigadier General Lackland, a former Kelly Field Commander, had originally proposed and campaigned for an aviation and cadet reception center on this site. Honor as the "Gateway to the Air Force" was secured.

Lackland established itself as a cohesive training base and formalized training evolved to support the Air Force Mission: " To Fly, To Fight, To Win." The basic training and commissioning programs inspired Air Force pride. A technical training group was established to oversee the many courses now taught at on base.

The Korean and Vietnam Wars severely tested Lackland's capacity to train new recruits and satisfy mobility demands. Training populations in the 1950s soared to 55,000 with only a maximum capacity of 25,000. Rapidly built wooden structures, built in 1941, to include the "Mobilization Open Bay" (MOB) dormitories, burst at the seams and forced the mass erection of a tent city. Temporary facilities, to include the "I" dormitories, were hastily erected as a quick fix to house the new recruits. Base operating support requirements force reactive planning, which often resulted in inadequate implementation.

During Vietnam, resourceful leaders split training shifts, increased flight sizes, and compressed training from 30 to 24 days to satisfy the urgency for military readiness. Training requirements also expanded to include teaching English to allied military members from foreign countries.

As a result of the contingencies of the 1950s and 60s, construction of permanent facilities, to include the 1,000 person steel and brick Recruit Housing and Training (RH&T) facilities for basic military training, cemented Lackland's training responsibilities. During the 1990s, Desert Storm revalidated our training value. Also, from the Cold War demise, base realignment and closure (BRAC) actions relocated several specialized training programs at Lackland.

In 1992, Lackland celebrated its fiftieth anniversary and also opened the doors for IAAFA's people and its training mission in the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Andrew. Air Education and Training Command emerged in 1993 under Air Force reorganization and relocated OTS to Maxwell AFB, Alabama.

Lackland AFB exists today with the 37th Training Wing as the host installation command, flanked by the largest Associate, the 59th Medical Wing (i.e. Wilford Hall Medical Center). Fifty years later, our focus on producing the world's best-trained warriors is razor sharp.1

Citations

  1. [S2214] Internet Site: Lackland AFB, Texas Web Site).

Hiram Benjamin Scutt1

M, #15209, b. April 17, 1842, d. July 29, 1889
Father*Hiram Scutt1 b. September 3, 1815, d. September 24, 1886
Mother*Ann Elizabeth Fuller1
Hiram Scutt
From Family Tree on Ancestry
     Hiram Benjamin Scutt, son of Hiram Scutt and Ann Elizabeth Fuller, was born on April 17, 1842 in Andes, Deleware County, New York.1
Hiram married Addie J. Ward on September 4, 1866 at Oswell, Addison County, Vermont.1
Hiram died on July 29, 1889 in Joliet, Will County, Illinois, at age 47.1 He was buried in August, 1889 in Illinois.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.

Richard A. Scutt1

M, #15210, b. April 17, 1842, d. September 17, 1842
Father*Hiram Scutt1 b. September 3, 1815, d. September 24, 1886
Mother*Ann Elizabeth Fuller1
     Richard A. Scutt, son of Hiram Scutt and Ann Elizabeth Fuller, was born on April 17, 1842.1
Richard died on September 17, 1842.1

Citations

  1. [S2040] Ancestry World Tree.