Nina Roberson1

F, #15481
Father*Daniel Roberson1
Mother*Nancy Dodds1

Citations

  1. [S2218] Internet Site: The Roberson Family Web Site – Jim Roberson (based on Dr. Everett King's book on Maries County)).

Warren Roberson1

M, #15482
Father*Daniel Roberson1
Mother*Nancy Dodds1

Citations

  1. [S2218] Internet Site: The Roberson Family Web Site – Jim Roberson (based on Dr. Everett King's book on Maries County)).

George Roberson1

M, #15483
Father*Daniel Roberson1
Mother*Nancy Dodds1

Citations

  1. [S2218] Internet Site: The Roberson Family Web Site – Jim Roberson (based on Dr. Everett King's book on Maries County)).

John Misel

M, #15484

Family

Child

Annie Roberson1

F, #15485
Father*Lytle Lambeth Roberson1 b. September 25, 1868, d. March 22, 1907
Mother*Laura Groves1 d. March 4, 1932
     Annie married Claude Ramsey.1

Citations

  1. [S2218] Internet Site: The Roberson Family Web Site – Jim Roberson (based on Dr. Everett King's book on Maries County)).

Claude Ramsey1

M, #15486
     Claude married Annie Roberson, daughter of Lytle Lambeth Roberson and Laura Groves.1

Citations

  1. [S2218] Internet Site: The Roberson Family Web Site – Jim Roberson (based on Dr. Everett King's book on Maries County)).

Samuel Roberson1

M, #15487
Father*Lytle Lambeth Roberson1 b. September 25, 1868, d. March 22, 1907
Mother*Laura Groves1 d. March 4, 1932

Citations

  1. [S2218] Internet Site: The Roberson Family Web Site – Jim Roberson (based on Dr. Everett King's book on Maries County)).

Lee Roberson1

M, #15488
Father*Lytle Lambeth Roberson1 b. September 25, 1868, d. March 22, 1907
Mother*Laura Groves1 d. March 4, 1932

Citations

  1. [S2218] Internet Site: The Roberson Family Web Site – Jim Roberson (based on Dr. Everett King's book on Maries County)).

Leslie Roberson1

M, #15489
Father*Lytle Lambeth Roberson1 b. September 25, 1868, d. March 22, 1907
Mother*Laura Groves1 d. March 4, 1932

Citations

  1. [S2218] Internet Site: The Roberson Family Web Site – Jim Roberson (based on Dr. Everett King's book on Maries County)).

Jeff Roberson1

M, #15490
Father*Lytle Lambeth Roberson1 b. September 25, 1868, d. March 22, 1907
Mother*Laura Groves1 d. March 4, 1932

Citations

  1. [S2218] Internet Site: The Roberson Family Web Site – Jim Roberson (based on Dr. Everett King's book on Maries County)).

Steamship Bremen Ship

?, #15491
S.S. Bremen
      North German Lloyd Company / Nord-deutscher Lloyd
The North German Lloyd Line (NGL) was founded in 1857 by the amalgamation of four smaller companies. They commenced operations between Bremen and London with six 500 ton steamers. Transatlantic voyages to New York started in June, 1858; Baltimore in March, 1868; and in 1869 regular sailings commenced to New Orleans. A service to Central America was instituted in 1871, but was withdrawn in 1874. Voyages from Bremen to Brazil and the River Plate started in 1876 and Genoa to Brazil and River Plate in 1878, the latter service only lasting for three years.

By 1866 NGL was making weekly runs to New York and in 1874 averaged 11 days and 13 hours on its sailings. From 1882 onwards, the New Orleans service was extended to Galveston, but the whole route was abandoned in 1886. Two new routes from Bremen to the Far East and Bremen to Australia were opened in 1886, both via Suez. Italy to New York sailings commenced in October, 1891 and in 1897, the Bremen - UK service was sold to Argo Steamship Company together with seven ships. Occasional sailings between Bremen and Galveston resumed in 1898 and became regular in 1899.

A fortnightly service was started in 1893 by what they called their Roland Line. The Roland Line sailed from Breman to New York with steerage passengers and cargo. By December of 1893 the line owned 80 vessels.

In 1904 a new service from Marseilles to Naples and Alexandria started and in 1909 a joint summer service between Bremen and Hamburg to Quebec and Montreal was instituted with Hamburg America, Red Star and Holland America Lines. Bremen - Galveston ships commenced calls at Philadelphia in March, 1910 and a new service started in 1913 to Boston and New Orleans.

At the outbreak of WWI, many NGL ships took refuge in US ports, and these were seized by American authorities in 1917. After the Armistice, the company lost every worthwhile ocean going steamer as war reparations, and in 1920 chartered ships from the US Shipping Board to resume services. They gradually rebuilt their fleet and in 1925 took over the Hamburg-Bremen Africa Line, the Dampschiff Reederei Horn and the Roland Line. In 1928 Quebec and Montreal services were resumed. During World War II, NGL again lost almost their entire fleet and again restarted with chartered ships. In 1970 the company amalgamated with Hamburg America Line to become HAPAG-Lloyd.


The full-rigged ship "BREMEN" (1843-1847)
At the outset of the great European emigration movement there were no special sailing ships used solely for passenger transport. Apart from freight sailing ships, former whalers were converted for postal and passenger services.

One such former whaler was the full-rigged ship "BREMEN", built in 1843 at Rickmers shipyard in Bremerhaven for the Südsee-Compagnie Bremen. Since the four year voyage to catch whales in the South Seas between 1843 and 1847 under Captain Christian Geerken ended in huge losses, the "BREMEN" was used several times to transport emigrants to New York in 1847.
Farbe Farbe Farbe
Shipyard: Rickmers shipyard, Bremerhaven
Construction date: 1843
Use: South Seas whaler
Rigging/Type: Full rigging
Length of keel: 120 feet (29.50 meters)
Width: 32 feet 10 inches (9.50 meters)
Deadweight tonnage: 350 load, 850 tons
Present whereabouts: Sold to Antwerp in 1847

Section through the whaler "BREMEN".
An additional deck was built into the hull of the whaler, a mid-deck which was about 1.70 meters in height. Up to 5 emigrants were accommodated in two bunk beds in this so-called steerage class. The travelers, for many of whom this was their first voyage, were responsible for their own bedding. Unlike the French, Dutch and English shipping companies, the Hamburg and Bremen companies took care of catering for the passengers themselves. Access and ventilation for the mid-deck, or so-called steerage class, was provided through a small hatch that had to be kept closed during heavy rain and storms. The crossing lasted 6 weeks on average, but sometimes twice that, depending on the weather.
The full-rigged ship "BREMEN" (1843-1847)
Section through the whaler "BREMEN".

BREMEN (1)
The steamship BREMEN was built by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland (ship #58), for Norddeutscher Lloyd--the first of 5 passenger steamships of this name owned by the line--at a cost of 1,281,000 gold marks, and launched on 1 February 1858. 2,674 tons; 97,53 x 11,89 meters/320 x 39 feet (length x breadth); clipper bow, 1 funnel, 3 masts (barkentine rigged); iron construction, screw propulsion, service speed 11 knots; accommodation for 160 passengers in 1st class, 110 in 2nd, and 401 in steerage; crew of between 102 and 118; freight capacity 1,000 tons; coal capacity 850 tons, burned at the rate of 2.2-2.5 kilos per horsepower hour. 19 June 1858, maiden voyage, Bremen-New York, carrying 115 passengers and 150 tons of freight; upon arrival at New York (4 July), she made a demonstration cruise to Sandy Hook, with invited guests that included Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 14 January 1860, reached Southampton under sail with a broken shaft; out of service undergoing repairs at Southampton for 6 months. 8 July 1860, resumed Bremen-New York service. 1864, a Krupp steel shaft installed, and boiler pre-heating. 5 November 1873, last voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York. June 1874, along with the steamship NEW YORK, sold to E. Bates & Co., Liverpool, for 19,000 pounds; both vessels converted to sail. 16 October 1882, ran ashore on the Farallon Islands, 27 miles outside the Golden Gate, directly under the light house, in a dense fog. The cargo of coal and whiskey was insured, the ship was not. Small craft waited for the whiskey cargo to float up; in 1929, a T. H. P. Whitelaw proposed raising the whiskey, but was prevented from doing so by the U.S. government [Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails, vol. 1 (Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994), p. 13; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 544]. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 11 February 1998]

The "Bremen" of 1858 was a 2,674 gross ton ship, built by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland for Norddeutscher Lloyd of Bremen. Her details were - length 97,53m x beam 11,88m (320ft x 39ft), she had a clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 160-1st, 110-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1st February 1858, she sailed from bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 19th June 1858. She continued on this service except for six months repair in 1860, when she fractured her propellor shaft. On 5th November 1873 she started her last voyage from Bremen to Southampton and New York, and in 1874 was sold to Edward Bates of Liverpool who had her engines removed and used her as a sailing vessel. On 16th October 1882 she was wrecked on the South Farralone Islands, California. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.544] - [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - February 11, 1998].


BREMEN 1858
The BREMEN of 1858 was a 2,674 gross ton ship, built by Caird & Co, Greenock, Scotland for Norddeutscher Lloyd of Bremen. Her details were - length 97,53m x beam 11,88m (320ft x 39ft), she had a clipper stem, one funnel, three masts (rigged for sail), iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 160-1st, 110-2nd and 400-3rd class passengers. Launched on 1st February 1858, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 19th June 1858. She continued on this service except for six months repair in 1860, when she fractured her propellor shaft. On 5th November 1873 she started her last voyage from Bremen to Southampton and New York, and in 1874 was sold to Edward Bates of Liverpool who had her engines removed and used her as a sailing vessel. On 16th October 1882 she was wrecked on the South Farralone Islands, California.
[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.544]

On June 19th NDL starts a service between Bremerhaven and New York with the steamship "Bremen".

Shiip Bremen

BREMEN (2)
The steamship BREMEN was built by F. Schuchau, of Danzig, for the North German Lloyd Line, and launched on 14 November 1896. 10,525 tons; 160,04 x 18,38 meters (525.1 x 60.3 feet, length x beam); 2 funnels, 2 masts; twin screw propulsion, service speed 15 knots; accommodation for 230 1st-, 250 2nd-, and 1,850 3rd-class passengers. 5 June 1897, maiden voyage, Bremen- Southampton-New York. 20 October 1897, first voyage, Bremen-Suez Canal-Australia. Interchangeable between the New York and Australia services. 30 June 1900, damaged in a fire at the North German Lloyd dock at Hoboken, New Jersey, along with the other North German Lloyd steamships SAALE, MAIN, and KAISER WILHELM DER GROSSE; almost 300 lives lost (including firefighters), 12 on the BREMEN. 11 October 1900, after provisional repairs, returned to Germany; refitted and lengthened to 167,78 meters (550.5 feet), 11,570 tons, by Vulcan, of Stettin. 12 October 1901, resumed Bremen-Southampton- New York service. 27 September 1911, last voyage, Bremen-Australia (16 roundtrip voyages). 20 June 1914, last voyage, Bremen-Southampton-New York; laid up at Bremen during World War I. 4 April 1919, surrendered to Britain; name unchanged; operated, on behalf of the Shipping Controller, by the P & O Line on its Australia service. 1921, sold to the Byron Steamship Co, and renamed CONSTANTINOPLE. 5 December 1921, first voyage, Constanza-Constantinople-Piraeus- New York. 4 September 1923, last voyage, Constanza-Constantinople-Piraeus-New York (8 roundtrip voyages). 1924, renamed KING ALEXANDER. 24 May 1924, first voyage, Piraeus-Patras-New York. 21 April 1925, last voyage, Piraeus-Patras-New York (6 roundtrip voyages). 1929, scrapped at Venice Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Bd. I: 1858-1912 (Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, 1972), pp. 22-23; Noel Reginald Pixell Bonsor, North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New (2nd ed; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 2 (1978), p. 560). Pictured in Michael J. Anuta, Ships of Our Ancestors (Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983), p. 32, courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square, Salem, MA 01970. Kludas, op. cit, p. 22, contains a picture of the BREMEN and MAIN burning at Hoboken in 1900. For further information on the BREMEN, including pictures, see: 1. Arnold Kludas, Die Seeschiffe des Norddeutschen Lloyd, Bd. 1. [1857 bis 1919 (Herford: Koehler, c1991). 2. Edwin Drechsel, Norddeutscher Lloyd Bremen, 1857-1970; History, Fleet, Ship Mails (2 vols; Vancouver: Cordillera Pub. Co., c1994-c1995). [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 16 September 1997]



BREMEN (3)
(of 1922)
POCAHONTAS
This was a 10,881 gross ton ship, built by AG Vulcan, Stettin for Norddeutscher Lloyd (North German Lloyd) in 1900. Her details were - length 523.5ft x beam 60.2ft, two funnels, two masts, twin screw and a speed of 15 knots. Accommodation was provided for 240-1st, 162-2nd and 1,954-3rd class passengers. Launched on 19/6/1900 as the "Prinzess Irene" for the Far East service, she actually commenced her maiden voyage between Bremen, Southampton, Cherbourg and New York on 9/9/1900. On 31/10/1900 she started the first of 7 voyages between Bremen, Suez and the Far East. On 30/4/1903 she commenced sailings between Genoa, Naples and New York and on 6/4/1910 was stranded on Long Island, NY. She was refloated and repaired at Newport News. On 9/7/1914 she commenced her last voyage from Genoa to Naples and New York, where she took refuge until seized by the USA in April 1917. She was renamed "Pocahontas" and used by the US Government until 1921 when she was chartered to US Mail Steamship Co. She commenced the first of two voyages between New York, Naples and Genoa on 26/2/1921 and was refitted to accommodate 350-cabin and 900-3rd class passengers. On 22/5/1921 she commenced her third voyage but only got as far as Gibralter where she was laid up with a machinery defect. In 1922 she was bought back by Norddeutscher Lloyd, towed to Germany, reconditioned and renamed "Bremen". She commenced sailing between Bremen and New York on 7/4/1923 and in April 1926 was refitted to carry cabin, tourist, 3rd cabin and 3rd class. On 28/9/1927 she commenced her last voyage from Bremen to Cobh and New York and in 1928 was renamed "Karlsruhe" to allow her previous name to be used for the new express liner. On 29/1/1928 she sailed on her first voyage under her new name, from Bremen to Cobh and New York and on 16/8/1931 commenced her last voyage from Bremen to Boulogne, Galway, Halifax, New York, Havana, Vera Cruz and Tampico. In June 1932 she started sailings between Bremen, Halifax and Galveston and on 20/8/1932 commenced her last Bremen - Galveston voyage. She was scrapped at Bremerhaven the same year. [ North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.563] There appears to be a lack of information on what the US Gov't used the ship for between 1917 and 1921 although one source states that she was used as a troopship. I suspect that US AT signifies US Army Transport and there is little doubt that, at the time in question, she was a military ship. [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 12 December 1997]

Ship George Hurlbut Ship

?, #15492
      George Hurlbut
The George Hurlbut was a 3-masted, square-rigged ship, 1047 tons, built in Essex, Connecticut in 1850, and registered at New York on 23 December 1850. She sailed originally in the Hurlbut Line between Havre and New York, with the winter crossing (between December and March) from Havre to New Orleans, until mid-1854, when she was transferred to Hurlbut's Antwerp-New York service. In 1856, Ezra D. Post, master, she was advertized as sailing in Tapscott's Line of New York-Liverpool packets, and in 1859, Thomas S. (or L.) Masson, master, as sailing in the Post Line of New York-Mobile packets and in the Stanton & Thompson Line of New York-New Orleans packets [Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), pp. 276; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 388 396, 397, 497, and 521]. I know nothing at present of the GEORGE HURLBUT's later history or ultimate fate. - [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 21 March 1998].

GEORGE HURLBUT (1850)
The U.S. ship GEORGE HURLBUT, 1047 tons, was built at Essex, Connecticut in 1850, and registered at New York on 23 December 1850. She sailed originally in the Hurlbut Line of sailing packets between New York and Havre, with the winter crossing (between December and March) from Havre to New Orleans, until mid-1854, when she was transferred to Hurlbut's New York- Antwerp service. In 1856, Ezra D. Post, master, she was advertized as sailing in Tapscott's Line of New York-Liverpool packets, and in 1859, Thomas S. (or L.) Masson, master, as sailing in the Post Line of New York-Mobile packets and in the Stanton & Thompson Line of New York-New Orleans packets.
Sources: Forrest R. Holdcamper, comp., List of American-flag Merchant Vessels that received Certificates of Enrollment or Registry at the Port of New York, 1789-1867 (Record Groups 41 and 36), National Archives Publication 68-10, Special Lists 22 (Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1968), p. 276; Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), pp. 388 396, 397, 497, and 521.1

Citations

  1. [S5869] Internet Site: Palmer List of Merchant Vessels).

Robert B. Martin1

M, #15494, b. 1910, d. October 27, 1983
Father*William F. Martin2 b. 1877
Mother*Martha (?)2 b. 1887
     Robert B. Martin, son of William F. Martin and Martha (?), was born in 1910.1
He lived with his parents, Martha and William, in 1910 at 3819a Russell Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri.2
Robert lived with his parents, Martha, in 1930 at 3815 Castleman in St. Louis, Missouri.
Robert was enumerated as the son of Martha (?) on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 15, St. Louis, Missouri. He was listed as a 20-year-old male born in Missouri as were his parents. He was attending school.3 Robert B. Martin joined in a domestic partnership with Frances G. Gaubatz circa 1950.4
Robert died on October 27, 1983 in Missouri.1
His obituary was published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Newspaper on October 27, 1983.5,6 His obituary stated:
Martin, Robert B., fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Thurs., Oct. 27, 1983, beloved of the late Frances G. Gadsby, beloved father of Elizabeth Martin, beloved uncle of Joan Gilbert, Linda Davis, and Peggy Gadsby, grandfather, great-grandfather and cousin. Funeral Mass, Sat., 10 a.m. at St. Catherine Laboure Church, Interment Calvary Cemetery. Member of 4522 Club, and a volunteer for Red Cross. Visitation Fri., 2 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. at Pfitzinger Mortuary, 331 S. Kirkwood Rd. Masses preferred
5

His funeral service was held on October 29, 1983 at St. Catherine Laboure Catholic Church, Sappington, St. Louis County, Missouri.5,6 He was buried on October 29, 1983 in Calvary Catholic Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.5

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1930Ward 15, St. Louis, MissouriMartha (?)3

Family

Frances G. Gaubatz b. April 24, 1914, d. November 20, 1982

Citations

  1. [S2220] Internet Site: The Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis Web Site).
  2. [S5943] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), William F. Martin household.
  3. [S5944] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Martha Martin household.
  4. [S1484] Personal knowledge of compiler.
  5. [S2266] Robert B. Martin Obituary, October 27, 1983.
  6. [S6948] St. Louis Post Dispatch "Robert B. Martin Obituary", October 27, 1983, page 30.

James G. Pappas1,2

M, #15495, b. January 15, 1899, d. January 11, 1947
     James G. Pappas was born on January 15, 1899 in Macedonia, Greece.1,3
James G. Pappas immigrated from 1904 to 1907 from Greece.3,4,5
James G. Pappas lived in 1910 713 North 20th Street, St. Louis, Missouri.6
James G. was working in a shoe factory in 1910.6
James was enumerated on the 1910 U.S. Census of Ward 5, St. Louis, Missouri, he was listed as a single 23-year-old male born in Greece as were his parents. He was a lodger in the household of George Stylos (no known relationship.)6 He was naturalized in 1918.5
James G. was a shoemaker in a factory in 1920.5
James G. Pappas lived in 1920 3413 Lucas Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri.5
James (his first marriage) married Minnie Louisa Berg (her second marriage), daughter of John Bernard Berg and Elizabeth "Lizzie" Theodor, in 1920.1,4
James was enumerated on the 1920 U.S. Census of Ward 20, St. Louis, Missouri, he was listed as a single 30-year-old male born in Greece as were his parents. He was a lodger in the household of Albert Bombal (no known relationship.)5
James G. was a shoe worker in 1930.4
Minnie and James G. Pappas lived in 1930 at 2316 Jefferson Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri. Residing with them were, Minnie's mother, Elizabeth "Lizzie" Theodor..4
James is a head of household on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 9, Precinct 17, Block 1401N, St. Louis, Missouri. He was identified as a43-year-old man born in Greece as were his parents. He was renting a home for $32.00 per month and was married for the first time at the age of 33. He was not a veteran. Enumerated with him were: his wife Minnie Louisa, his mother-in-law Elizabeth "Lizzie" Theodor.4
James G. was worker in a shoe factory in 1940. In 1939 he worked 33 weeks and earned $990.00. He worked 40 hours in the period March 24-30, 1940.7
Minnie and James G. Pappas lived in 1940 at 3106 Oak Hill in St. Louis, Missouri. Residing with them were, Minnie's mother, Elizabeth "Lizzie" Theodor..7
James is a head of householdon the 1940 U. S. Census for Ward 14, St. Louis, Missouri. He was identified as a married 55-year-old male born in Greece. He was renting a home for $20.00 per month and had attended school through the fourth grade. Enumerated with him were: his wife, Minnie Louisa, his mother-in-law Elizabeth "Lizzie" Theodor.7
James G. was a shoeworker with Paramount Shoe Company in 1947 at St. Louis, Missouri.3 At the time of his death in 1947, James resided at 3162a Oak Hill Street in St. Louis, Missouri.3
Minnie and James G. Pappas lived in 1947 at 3162A Fillmore Street in Missouri. Residing with them were..2
James died on January 11, 1947 at St. Louis City Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, at age 47, Minnie Louisa Berg was the informant on his death certificate.1,2,3 His cause of death was massive cerebral hemorrhage.3
His obituary was published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Newspaper on January 13, 1947.2 His obituary stated:
Pappas, James G. - 3162A Oakhill, Sat., Jan. 11, 1947, beloved husband of Minnie Pappas (nee Berg), dear father of Gloria and Lorraine Pappas, dear brother, brother-in-law and uncle. Funeral from the Peetz Funeral Home, Lafayette and Longfellow blvd, Tues., Jan. 14, 9 a.m. Interment SS. Peter and Paul's Cemetery
2

The undertaker who handled his arrangements was Putz Funeral Home at 3029 Lafayette Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri.3 James G. Pappas was buried on January 14, 1947 in Sts. Peter and Paul Cemetery in St. Louis County, Missouri, in section 37, lot 1138.18
James G. Pappas Tombstone

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1910Ward 5, St. Louis, MissouriJames G. Pappas6
1920Ward 20, St. Louis, MissouriJames G. Pappas5
1930Ward 9, Precinct 17, Block 1401N, St. Louis, MissouriJames G. Pappas4
1940Ward 14, St. Louis, MissouriJames G. Pappas7

Family

Minnie Louisa Berg b. November 27, 1889, d. April, 1980

Citations

  1. [S2220] Internet Site: The Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis Web Site).
  2. [S2270] James G. Pappas Obituary, January 13, 1947.
  3. [S559] James Pappas Death Certificate.
  4. [S558] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), James G. Pappas household.
  5. [S561] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Albert Bombal household.
  6. [S560] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), George Stylos household.
  7. [S7954] 1940 — Sixteenth Census of the United States (Population Schedule), Missouri, James G. Pappas household.
  8. [S556] Internet Site: Find-A-Grave Web Site).

St. Monica Cemetery (Creve Coeur MO)

?, #15496
St. Monica Cemetery
     
Search for cemetery records in Saint Monica Cemetery, MO at by entering a surname and clicking search:

Restrict search to

Surname.

     St. Monica Cemetery (Creve Coeur MO) is located at 12316 Olive Street Road in Creve Coeur, St. Louis County, Missouri, 38.673509, -90.456922; From I-270 take exit 14 West. (about 240 yards)
Immediately on the left you will see the church.
Turn left after frontage road Coeur de Ville Ln.

The following people are buried here.


Catherine Hezel. in the old section, lot 25.1

Martina Hezel. in the old section, lot 25. Tombstone Photo.1

Mrs. Mary Catherine Hezel - June 1, 1898, aged 60. in the old section, lot 25. Tombstone Photo.1

Mrs. Mary Rekart. Tombstone Photo.2

John Hezel. in the old section, lot 25. Tombstone Photo.1

John P. Rekart - October 30, 1912, aged 58. Tombstone Photo.3

Edward J. Rekart - November 3, 1913, aged 82. Tombstone Photo.4,2

Charles Hezel - September 9, 1927, aged 63. in the old section, lot 50. Tombstone Photo.1,5

Elizabeth Hezel - 1931. in the old section, lot 25. Tombstone Photo.1

Lucy Rekart. Tombstone Photo.2

John Bernard Hezel - May 9, 1940, aged 65. in the new section, lot 20NH. Tombstone Photo.6,1

Mrs. Josephine Rekart - December, 1941, aged 80. Tombstone Photo.2

Mrs. Julianna Hezel. in the old section, lot 50. Tombstone Photo.1

Clara Hezel - October 21, 1960. in the old section, lot 50. Tombstone Photo.1

John Andrew Hezel - March 18, 1961, aged 65. in the old section, lot 50. Tombstone Photo.1

Mrs. Mary Louise Hezel - April 18, 1962, aged 64. in the old section, lot 50. Tombstone Photo.1,7

George Alexander Rekart. Tombstone Photo.2

Mrs. Mary Stock - October 27, 1965, aged 89. in the old section, lot 25.1

Mrs. Annabelle Rekart. Tombstone Photo.2

John Edward Rekart. Tombstone Photo.2

Charles M. Stock - July 27, 1972, aged 96. in the old section, lot 25.1

Mrs. Margaret Hezel - March 19, 1974. in the new section, lot 20NH. Tombstone Photo.1,8

Lydia Barbara Litzsinger. Tombstone Photo.2

Richard Ado Rekart. Tombstone Photo.2

George A Rekart , Jr - October 22, 1987, aged 64. Tombstone Photo.2,9

Richard J. Rahm - April 5, 1995, aged 76. in the new section, lot 20NH.1

Marie Louise Rekart. Tombstone Photo.2

Aurelia Hezel - February 3, 1999, aged 97. in the old section, lot 50. Tombstone Photo.1

Mrs. Elsie Holm Rekart. Tombstone Photo.2

Elaine Mildred Peterson. Tombstone Photo.2

Citations

  1. [S2220] Internet Site: The Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis Web Site).
  2. [S556] Internet Site: Find-A-Grave Web Site).
  3. [S4735] John Rekart Death Certificate.
  4. [S4738] Edward Rekart Death Certificate.
  5. [S5282] Charles Hezel Death Certificate.
  6. [S6948] St. Louis Post Dispatch "John B. Hezel Obituary", May 7, 1940, page 22.
  7. [S6948] St. Louis Post Dispatch "Mary Hezel Obituary", April 17, 1962, page 11.
  8. [S6948] St. Louis Post Dispatch "Margaret Hezel Obituary", March 18, 1974, page 16.
  9. [S6948] St. Louis Post Dispatch "George A. Rekart Jr. Obituary", October 22, 1987, page 20.

Leslie W. Block1

M, #15497, b. November, 1932, d. November, 1932
Father*Leslie Walton Block1 b. November 20, 1896, d. November, 1957
Mother*Lucille Margaret Wilson1 b. 1904, d. July, 1994
     Leslie died in November, 1932.1 Leslie W. Block, son of Leslie Walton Block and Lucille Margaret Wilson, was born in November, 1932.1 Leslie W. Block was buried on November 10, 1932 in Calvary Catholic Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri, in section 24, lot 3941.1

Citations

  1. [S2220] Internet Site: The Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis Web Site).

Emma Genevieve Lyle1,2

F, #15498, b. 1865, d. September, 1947
     She was normally known as Genevieve. Emma Genevieve Lyle was born in 1865.1
Emma married Celestine Block, son of Hyman Eugene Block and Mary Louise Kaltenbach, in 1886.1,3
Emma and Celestine Block lived in 1900 at 432 Elk Street in Eureka Springs, Caroll County, Arkansas. Residing with them were, their children Elizabeth, Genevieve, Lyle, Annie, Leslie and Marcell..4
Emma was enumerated as the wife of Celestine Block under the name of "Jennie Bleck" on the 1900 U. S. Census of Ward 1, Eureka Springs, Caroll County, Arkansas. She was listed as a 34-year-old woman born in Missouri as were her parents; she had been married for 14 years and had six children all still living.4
Emma and Celestine Block lived in 1910 at 23 Fairmont Street in Eureka Springs, Caroll County, Arkansas. Residing with them were, their children Elizabeth, Genevieve, Lyle, Annie, Leslie, Marcell, Kennett, Celeste and Donald..3
Emma was enumerated as the wife of Celestine Block under the name of "Genevieve Block" on the 1910 U. S. Census of Cedar Township, Eureka Springs, Caroll County, Arkansas. She was listed as a 42-year-old female born in Missouri as were her parents. This was her first marriage and hand been married for 24-years with nine children, all still living.3
Emma and Celestine Block lived in 1920 at 210 North Old Orchard Avenue in Webster Groves, St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Leslie, Marcell, Celeste, Donald and Kennett..5
Emma was enumerated as the wife of Celestine Block under the name of "Genevieve Block" on the 1920 U. S. Census of Webster Groves, St. Louis County, Missouri. She was listed as a married 55-year-old woman born in Missouri as were her parents.5 Emma and Celestine Block lived in 1921 at 210 North Old Orchard Avenue, Missouri.2
Emma died in September, 1947.1 She was buried on September 1, 1947 in Calvary Catholic Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri, in section 24, lot 366.1
Celestine, Emma, Leslie and Lucille Block Tombstone

Family

Celestine Block b. June 13, 1856, d. August 29, 1921
Children

Citations

  1. [S2220] Internet Site: The Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis Web Site).
  2. [S2276] Celestin Block Obituary, August 30, 1921.
  3. [S5154] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Cell Block household.
  4. [S5155] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Celestine Bleck household.
  5. [S2991] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Cell Block household.
  6. [S556] Internet Site: Find-A-Grave Web Site).

Celestine Block1

M, #15499, b. June 13, 1856, d. August 29, 1921
Father*Hyman Eugene Block2 b. 1826, d. June, 1909
Mother*Mary Louise Kaltenbach b. December 22, 1836, d. June 4, 1929
     Celestine Block, son of Hyman Eugene Block and Mary Louise Kaltenbach, was born on June 13, 1856 in St. Louis, Missouri.1,2,3,4
He lived with his parents, Mary and Hyman, in 1860 at Ward 7 in St. Louis, Missouri.5
He was enumerated with his parent Hyman Eugene Block on the 1860 U. S. Census for Ward 7, Missouri. He was listed as a four-year-old boy born in Missouri.5
Celestine was a clerk in a dry goods store in 1880.2
He lived with his parents, Mary and Hyman, in 1880 at 107 Chamning Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri.2
Celestine was enumerated as the son of Hyman Eugene Block on the 1880 U. S. Census of Missouri. He was listed as a single 24-year-old male born in Missouri, his father was born in Bohemia and his mother in Wisconsin.2
Celestine married Emma Genevieve Lyle in 1886.1,6
The 1889 city directory of St. Louis, Missouri shows he was living at 3111 Brantner Place. His occupation was listed as a bookkeeper for Municipal E. L. & P. Company.7
Emma and Celestine Block lived in 1900 at 432 Elk Street in Eureka Springs, Caroll County, Arkansas. Residing with them were, their children Elizabeth, Genevieve, Lyle, Annie, Leslie and Marcell..8
Celestine was a bookkeeper from 1900 to 1910 at Eureka Springs, Caroll County, Arkansas.8,6
Celestine is a head of household, under the name of "Celestine Bleck", on the 1900 U. S. Census of Ward 1, Eureka Springs, Caroll County, Arkansas. He was identified as a 40-year-old male born in Missouri as was his father, his mother was born in Bohemia. He had been married for 14 years and was renting a home. Enumerated with him were: his wife Emma Genevieve, his sons Lyle, Leslie Walton and Marcell, his daughters Elizabeth, Genevieve and Annie.8
Emma and Celestine Block lived in 1910 at 23 Fairmont Street in Eureka Springs, Caroll County, Arkansas. Residing with them were, their children Elizabeth, Genevieve, Lyle, Annie, Leslie, Marcell, Kennett, Celeste and Donald..6
Celestine is a head of household on the 1910 U. S. Census of Cedar Township, Eureka Springs, Caroll County, Arkansas. He was identified as a 53-year-old man born in Missouri as were his parents; he had been married for 24 years in his present marriage (his first) and ws renting a home. Enumerated with him were: his wife Emma Genevieve, his sons Lyle, Leslie Walton, Marcell, Kennett B. and Donald, his daughters Genevieve, Elizabeth, Annie and Celeste.6
Celestine was listed as: "secretary, street cleaning" in the 1920 census in 1920.3
Emma and Celestine Block lived in 1920 at 210 North Old Orchard Avenue in Webster Groves, St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Leslie, Marcell, Celeste, Donald and Kennett..3
Celestine is a head of household on the 1920 U. S. Census of Webster Groves, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was identified as la 62-year-old married man born in Missouri, his mother was born in Wisconsin. He owned a home free of mortgage. Enumerated with him were: his wife Emma Genevieve, his sons Leslie Walton, Marcell, Donald and Kennett B., his daughter Celeste.3 Emma and Celestine Block lived in 1921 at 210 North Old Orchard Avenue in Missouri.9
Celestine died on August 29, 1921 at St. John's Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, at age 65.1,9,4 His cause of death was acute cardiac dilitation accompanied by cirrhosis of lilver.4
His obituary was published in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Newspaper on August 30, 1921.9 His obituary stated:
Block - entered into rest, Monday, aug. 29, 1921, at 9 a. m., Celestin Block, beloved husband of Genevieve Lyle Block and our dear father and grandfather. Funeral will take place from residence, 210 North Old Orchard avenue, Webster Groves, on Wednesday, Aug. 31, at 8:30 a. m. to St. Michael's Church, Shrewsbury Park, thence to Calvary Cemetery. (c)
9

His funeral service was held on August 31, 1921 at St. Michael's Catholic Church, Shrewsbury, St. Louis County, Missouri.9 He was buried on August 31, 1921 in Calvary Catholic Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri, in section 24, lot 366.1
Celestine, Emma, Leslie and Lucille Block Tombstone

Family

Emma Genevieve Lyle b. 1865, d. September, 1947
Children

Citations

  1. [S2220] Internet Site: The Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis Web Site).
  2. [S2990] 1880 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), H. E. Block household.
  3. [S2991] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Cell Block household.
  4. [S5153] Celestine Block Death Certificate.
  5. [S3024] 1860 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Harman Block household.
  6. [S5154] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Cell Block household.
  7. [S373] 1889 St. Louis City Directory.
  8. [S5155] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Celestine Bleck household.
  9. [S2276] Celestin Block Obituary, August 30, 1921.
  10. [S556] Internet Site: Find-A-Grave Web Site).

Charles Thomas Wilson1

M, #15500, b. 1874, d. May, 1931
     Charles married Elizabeth (?) Charles Thomas Wilson was born in 1874.1
Charles died in May, 1931.1 He was buried on May 18, 1931 in Calvary Catholic Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri, in section 24, lot 3941.1

Family

Elizabeth (?) b. 1877, d. April, 1960
Child

Citations

  1. [S2220] Internet Site: The Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis Web Site).

Elizabeth (?)

F, #15501, b. 1877, d. April, 1960
     Elizabeth married Charles Thomas Wilson. Elizabeth (?) was born in 1877.1
Elizabeth died in April, 1960.1 She was buried on April 18, 1960 in Calvary Catholic Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri, in section 24, lot 3941.1

Family

Charles Thomas Wilson b. 1874, d. May, 1931
Child

Citations

  1. [S2220] Internet Site: The Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of St. Louis Web Site).

Helan Murdev1

F, #15502, b. June 7, 1845
Father*Johann Martin Murdev1
Mother*Philippina Rosina (?)1

Family

Gottlieb Imannual Lodholz b. August 9, 1839, d. September 28, 1879

Citations

  1. [S4968] Family History Library film number International 1201979.

Appendix L General Land Documents

?, #15509
      Land Laws
The Congress of the Confederation opted for a policy of orderly land settlement with the adoption of the Land Ordinance of 1785. The ordinance provided for the survey and auction of public lands. After the first surveys were completed in Ohio, the first public domain lands were sold from a one-room office of the Board of Treasury in the Federal Building located in lower New York City. That office moved to Philadelphia in 1790. The deficiencies of that policy, including the requirement that all public lands be paid for in cash, brought wide spread demands for a reform of public land laws. On May 10, 1800, President John Adams signed a new public land law meeting most of the demands of the settlers and providing for establishment of local land offices near the lands being sold.
In 1803, President Jefferson negotiated the Louisiana Purchase, adding more than 500 million acres of public lands west of the Mississippi. From 1800 to 1812, Congress created 14 new land districts besides those established in 1800. For each new district a land office had to be set up and two new officials appointed to run the district.
When the public lands were sold or transferred through executive order, "patents" were issued. Patents are deeds transferring land ownership from a sovereign (the U.S. Government) to a buyer. A patent is the first record in a chain of title for a parcel of land. Before March 2, 1833, all original patents were actually signed by the President of the United States; after that, designated officials signed in his behalf.
VIRGINIA MILITARY WARRANT ACT
During the Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress offered land bounties to recruits who joined in the army and navy. The Virginia Military Warrant Act of August 10, 1790 enabled the officers and soldiers of the Virginia Line on continental establishment, to obtain titles to certain lands lying northwest of the Ohio River, between the Little Miami and Sciota Rivers.
MILITARY SURVEY AND UNITED BRETHREN ACT
The Act of June 1, 1796 provided for the grants of land for military service during the Revolutionary War. The Act also provided for the regulation of grants for the Society of the United Brethren, for the purpose of propagating the Gospel among the heathen in Ohio.
CREEK NATION ACT
The Act of March 3, 1817 between the U.S. Government and the Creek Nation, provided for the location of lands reserved for the settlement of the Creek people.
CASH ENTRY ACT
The Act of April 24, 1820 set the minimum price for sale of public land at $1.25 an acre, and the minimum unit of sale at 80 acres. Public lands were initially offered by district land offices at pre-announced, scheduled public auctions. Then, if unsold, lands became available for purchase at the $1.25 minimum price on a first-come-first-served basis.
CHOCTAW TREATIES AND ACT
The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was signed on September 15, 1830 between the U.S. Government and the Choctaw Nation. The treaty and subsequent Act of August 23, 1842 addressed the settlement of the Choctaw people west of the Mississippi River.
HOMESTEAD ENTRY ACT
The Act of May 20, 1862, authorized unrestricted settlement on public lands to all settlers, requiring only residence, cultivation, and some improvement to a tract of 160 acres. Any person was eligible who was head of a family or had reached the age of 21, who was a citizen or intended to become one, and who did not own as much as 160 acres. After living on the land and farming it for 6 months, he could buy the homestead at $1.25 an acre. But after 5 continuous
years, he could apply for and receive a patent or title to the 160 acres for a filing fee of $15.

Text of the Cash Entry Act
SIXTEENTH CONGRESS. Sess. I. Ch. 51 1820.
Chap. LI - An Act making further provision for the sale of the public lands.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled, That from and after the first day of July next, all the public lands of the United States, the sale of which is, or may be authorized by law, shall, when offered at public sale, to the highest bidder, be offered in half quarter sections; and when offered at private sale, may be purchased, at the option of the purchaser, either in entire sections, half sections, quarter sections, or half quarter sections; and in every case of the division of a quarter section, the line for the division thereof shall run north and south, and the corners and contents of half quarter sections which may thereafter be sold, shall be ascertained in the manner, and on the principles directed and prescribed by the second section of an act entitled, "An act concerning the mode of surveying the public lands of the United States," passed on the eleventh day of February, eighteen hundred and five; and fractional sections, containing one hundred and sixty acres, or upwards, shall, in like manner, as nearly as practicable, be sub-divided into half quarter sections, under such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury; but fractional sections, containing less than one hundred and sixty acres, shall not be divided, but shall be sold entire: Provided, That this section shall not be construed to alter any special provision made by law for the sale of land in town lots.
Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That credit shall not be allowed for the purchase money on the sale of any of the public lands which shall be sold after the first day of July next, but every purchaser of land sold at public sale thereafter, shall, on the day of purchase, make complete payment therefor; and the purchaser at private sale shall produce, to the register of the land office, a receipt from the treasurer of the United States, or from the receiver of public moneys of the district, for the amount of the purchase money on any tract, before he shall enter the same at the land office; and if any person, being the highest bidder, at public sale, for a tract of land, shall fail to make payment therefor, on the day on which the same was purchased, the tract shall be again offered at public sale, on the next day of sale, and such person shall not be capable of becoming the purchaser of that or any other tract offered at such public sales.
Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That from and after the first day of July next, the price at which the public lands shall be offered for sale, shall be one dollar and twenty-five cents an acre; and at every public sale, the highest bidder, who shall make payment as aforesaid, shall be the purchaser; but no land shall be sold, either at public or private sale, for a less price than one dollar and twenty-five cents an acre; all the public lands which shall have been offered at public sale before the first day of July next, and which shall then remain unsold, as well as the lands that shall thereafter be offered at public sale, according to law, and remain unsold at the close of such public sales, shall be subject to be sold at private sale, by entry at the land office, at one dollar and twenty-five cents an acre, to be paid at the time of making such entry as aforesaid; with the exception, however, of the lands which may have reverted to the United States, for failure in payment, and of the heretofore reserved sections for the future disposal of Congress, in the states of Ohio and Indiana, which shall be offered at public sale, as hereinafter directed.
Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That no lands which have reverted, or which shall hereafter revert, and become forfeited to the United States for failure in any manner to make payment, shall, after the first day of July next, be subject to entry at private sale, nor until the same shall have been first offered to the highest bidder at public sale; and all such lands which shall have reverted before the said first day of July next, and which shall then belong to the United States, together with the sections, and parts of sections, heretofore reserved for the future disposal of Congress, which shall, at the time aforesaid, remain unsold, shall be offered at public sale to the highest bidder, who shall make payment therefor, in half quarter sections, at the land office for the respective districts, on such day or days as shall, by proclamation of the President of the United States, be designated for that purpose; and all lands which shall revert and become forfeited for failure of payment after the said first day of July next, shall be offered in like manner at public sale, at such time, or times, as the President shall by his proclamation designate for the purpose: Provided, that no such lands shall be sold at any public sales hereby authorized, for a less price than one dollar and twenty-five cents an acre, nor on any other terms than that of cash payment; and all the lands offered at such public sales, and which shall remain unsold at the close thereof, shall be subject to entry at private sale, in the same manner, and at the same price with the other lands sold at private sale, at the respective land offices.
Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the several public sales authorized by this act, shall, respectively, be kept open for two weeks, and no longer; and the registers of the land office and the receivers of public money shall, each, respectively, be entitled to five dollars for each day's attendance thereon.
Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That, in every case hereafter, where two or more persons shall apply for the purchase, at private sale, of the same tract, at the same time, the register shall determine the preference, by forthwith offering the tract to the highest bidder.
Approved, April 24, 1820

Rosemann Land Patent

This property was owned by Herman Roseman, the father of David Roseman who married Theresa Schamberger:

Patent Description Mo0840.376

Cancelled: N
Document Number: 16099
Patentee Name: ROSEMANN, HERMAN
Warrantee Name:
Authority: April 24, 1820: Cash Entry Sale (3 Stat. 566)
Signature Present: Y
Signature Date: 6/1/1849
Metes/Bounds: N
Survey Date:
Subsurface Reserved: N
Land Office: St. Louis
Comments:

Legal Land Description:

Number 1
Aliquot Parts: NENE
Section/Block: 24
Township: 43 North
Range: 2 West
Fractional Section:
Meridian: 5th Principal Meridian
Acres: 40
County: Franklin

Description on the document reads:

The North East Quarter or the North East Quarter of Section Twenty Four in Township Forty Three of Range Two West in the district of Lands subject to sale at St. Louis, Missouri, containing Forty acres.      
Figure 1 - Roseman Land Patent

Behm Land Patents

Patent Description MO1030.150

Cancelled: N
Document Number: 28375
Patentee Name: BOHN, JACOB
Warrantee Name:
Authority: April 24, 1820: Cash Entry Sale (3 Stat. 566)
Signature Present: Y
Signature Date: 11/1/1856
Metes/Bounds: N
Survey Date:
Subsurface Reserved: N
Land Office: St. Louis
Comments:


Legal Land Description:

Number 1
Aliquot Parts: S1/2NE
Section/Block: 17
Township: 42 North
Range: 5 East
Fractional Section:
Meridian: 5th Principal Meridian
Acres: 80
County: Jefferson

Figure 2 - Behm Land Patent


Patent Description MO1020.235

Cancelled: N
Document Number: 23427
Patentee Name: BOHN, JACOB
Warrantee Name:
Authority: April 24, 1820: Cash Entry Sale (3 Stat. 566)
Signature Present: Y
Signature Date: 10/1/1856
Metes/Bounds: N
Survey Date:
Subsurface Reserved: N
Land Office: St. Louis
Comments:

Legal Land Description:

Number 1
Aliquot Parts: NENE
Section/Block: 17
Township: 42 North
Range: 5 West
Fractional Section
Meridian: 5th principal meridian
Acres: 40
County: Gasconade.