Sarah Kemble1

F, #25411, b. July 5, 1755, d. June 8, 1831
Father*Roger Kemble1 b. 1722, d. 1802
Mother*Sarah Ward1 b. 1735, d. 1807
Sarah Kemble Siddons
     Sarah Kemble, daughter of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, was born on July 5, 1755.1
Sarah married William Siddons on November 26, 1773.1
Sarah died on June 8, 1831 at age 75.1
English actress, the eldest of twelve children of Roger Kemble, was born in the "Shoulder of Mutton" public-house, Brecon, Wales, on the 5th of July 1755. Through the special care of her mother in sending her to the schools in the towns where the company played, Sarah Kemble received a remarkably good education, although she was accustomed to make her appearance on the stage while still a child. She became attached to William Siddons, an actor of the company; but this was discountenanced by her parents, who wished her to accept the offer of a squire. Siddons was dismissed from the company, and she was sent to a situation as lady's maid to Mrs. Greathead at Guy's Cliff in Warwickshire. Here she recited Shakespeare, Milton and Rowe in the servants' hall, and occasionally before aristocratic company, and here also she began to develop a capacity for sculpture which was subsequently developed (between 1789 and 1790), and of which she provided samples in busts of herself and of her son. The necessary consent to her union with Siddons was at last obtained, and the marriage took place at Trinity Church, Coventry, on the 26th of November 1773. It was while playing at Cheltenham in the following year that Mrs. Siddons met with the earliest decided recognition of her powers as an actress, when by her representation of Belvidera in Thomas Otway's Venice Preserved she moved to tears a party of "people of quality" who had come to scoff. Her merits were made known by them to David Garrick, who sent his deputy to Cheltenham to see her as Calista in Rowe's Fair Penitent, the result being that she was engaged to appear at Drury Lane at a salary of £5 a week. Owing to inexperience as well as other circumstances, her first appearances as Portia and in other parts were unfortunate, and when, after playing with success in Birmingham, she was about to return to town she received a note from the manager of Drury Lane stating that her services would not be required. Thus, in her own words, "banished from Drury Lane as a worthless candidate for fame and fortune", she again in the beginning of 1777 went on "the circuit" in the provinces. After a very successful engagement at Bath, beginning in 1778 and lasting five years, she again accepted an offer from Drury Lane, when her appearance as Isabella in Garrick's version of Thomas Southerne's Fatal Marriage, on the 10th of October 1782, was a triumph, only equalled in the history of the English stage by that of Garrick's first night at Drury Lane in 1741 and that of Edmund Kean's in 1814. In her earlier years it was in scenes of a tender and melting character that she exercised the strongest sway over an audience; but in the performance of Lady Macbeth, in which she appeared on the 2nd of February 1785 for the first time in London, it was the grandeur of her exhibition of the more terrible passions as related to one awful purpose that held them spellbound. In Lady Macbeth she found the highest and best scope for her gifts. It fitted her as no other character did, and as perhaps it will never fit another actress. Her extraordinary and peculiar physical endowments -- tall and striking figure, brilliant beauty, powerfully expressive eyes, and solemn dignity of demeanor -- enabled her to confer a weird majesty on the character which inexpressibly heightened the tragic awe surrounding her fate. After Lady Macbeth she played Desdemona, Rosalind and Ophelia, all with great success; but it was in Queen Catherine -- which she first played on the occasion of her brother John Kemble's spectacular revival of Henry VIII in 1788 -- that she discovered a part almost as well adapted to her peculiar powers as that of Lady Macbeth. As Volumnia in Kemble's version of Coriolanus she also secured a triumph. In her early life she had attempted comedy, but her gifts in this respect were very limited. It was of course inevitable that comparisons should be made between her and her only peer, Rachel, who undoubtedly excelled her in intensity and the portrayal of fierce passion, but was a less finished artist and lacked Siddons' dignity and pathos. Though Siddons' minute and systematic study perhaps gave a certain amount of stiffness to her representations, it conferred on them a symmetry and proportion to which Rachel never attained. Siddons formally retired from the stage in 1812, but occasionally appeared on special occasions even when advanced in years. Her last appearance was on the 9th of June 1819 as Lady Randolph in John Home's Douglas, for the benefit of Mr. and Mrs Charles Kemble. Her most striking impersonations, besides the roles already mentioned, were those of Zara in William Congreve's Mourning Bride, Constance in King John, Mrs. Hailer in The Stranger, and Elvira in Pizarro. In private life Siddons enjoyed the friendship and respect of many of the most eminent persons of her time. Horace Walpole at first refused to join the fashionable chorus of her praise, but he was ultimately won over. Samuel Johnson wrote his name on the hem of her garment in the famous picture of the actress as the Tragic Muse by Reynolds (now in the Dulwich Gallery). "I would not lose", he said, "the honor this opportunity afforded to me for my name going down to posterity on the hem of your garment." Siddons died in London on the 8th of June 1831, and was buried in Paddington churchyard. (www.nndb.com/people.) ; Sarah Siddons as the Tragic Muse 1784 by Sir Joshua Reynolds
Sarah Siddons as the Tragic Muse 1784 by Sir Joshua Reynolds
; Sarah Siddons
Sarah Kemble Siddons
; Sarah Siddons
Sarah Kemble Siddons

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.

William Siddons1

M, #25412
     William married Sarah Kemble, daughter of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, on November 26, 1773.1

Family

Sarah Kemble b. July 5, 1755, d. June 8, 1831

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.

John Philip Kemble1

M, #25413, b. 1757, d. February 26, 1823
Father*Roger Kemble1 b. 1722, d. 1802
Mother*Sarah Ward1 b. 1735, d. 1807
John Philip Kemble
John Philip Kemble
     John Philip Kemble, son of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, was born in 1757.1
John married Priscill Hopkins on December 8, 1787.1
John died on February 26, 1823 in Lausanne, Canton of Vaud, Switzerland.1 ; John Phillip Kemble as Hamlet by Sir Thomas Lawrence
John Phillip Kemble as Hamlet by Sir Thomas Lawrence

The second child of Roger Kemble, he was born at Prescot, Lancashire. His mother being a Roman Catholic, he was educated at Sedgeley Park Catholic seminary, near Wolverhampton, and the English college at Douai, with a view to becoming a priest. At the end of the four years' course, he still felt no vocation for the priesthood, and returning to England he joined the theatrical company of Crump & Chamberlain, his first appearance being as Theodosius in Nathaniel Lee's tragedy of that name at Wolverhampton on January 8, 1776.

In 1778, Kemble joined the York company of Tate Wilkinson, appearing at Wakefield as Captain Plume in George Farquhar's The Recruiting Officer; in Hull for the first time as Macbeth on October 30, and in York as Orestes in Ambrose Philips's Distresset Mother. In 1781 he obtained a "star" engagement at Dublin making his first appearance there on November 2 as Hamlet. He also achieved great success as Raymond in The Count of Narbonne, a play taken from Horace Walpole's Castle of Otranto.

Gradually he won for himself a high reputation as a careful and finished actor, and this, combined with the greater fame of his sister, Sarah, led to an engagement at Drury Lane, where he made his first appearance on September 30, 1783 as Hamlet. In this role he awakened interest and discussion among the critics rather than the enthusiastic approval of the public. As Macbeth on March 31, 1785 he shared in the enthusiasm aroused by Sarah Siddons, and established a reputation among living actors second only to hers. Brother and sister had first appeared together at Drury Lane on November 22, 1783, as Beverley and Mrs Beverley in Edward Moore's The Gamester, and as King John and Constance in Shakespeare's tragedy.

In the following year they played Montgomerie and Matilda in Richard Cumberland's The Carmelite, and in 1785 Adorni and Camiola in Kemble's adaptation of Philip Massinger's A Maid of Honor, and Othello and Desdemona. Between 1785 and 1787 Kemble appeared in a variety of roles, his Mentevole in Robert Jephson's Julia producing an overwhelming impression.

In December 1787 he married Priscilla Hopkins Brereton, the widow of an actor and herself an actress. Kemble's appointment as manager of Drury Lane in 1788 gave him full opportunity to dress the characters less according to tradition than in harmony with his own conception of what was suitable. He was also able to experiment with whatever parts might strike his fancy, and of this privilege he took advantage with greater courage than discretion.

He played a huge number of parts, including a large number of Shakespearian characters and also a great many in plays now forgotten, in his own version of Coriolanus, which was revived during his first season, the character of the "noble Roman" was so exactly suited to his powers that he not only played it with a perfection that has never been approached, but, it is said, unconsciously allowed its influence to colour his private manner and modes of speech. His tall and imposing person, noble countenance, and solemn and grave demeanour were uniquely adapted for the Roman characters in Shakespeare's plays; and, when in addition had to depict the gradual growth and development of one absorbing passion, his representation gathered a momentum and majestic force that were irresistible.

His defect was in flexibility, variety, rapidity; the characteristic of his style was method, regularity, precision, elaboration even of the minutest details, founded on a thorough psychological study of the special personality he had to represent. His elocutionary art, his fine sense of rhythm and emphasis, enabled him to excel in declamation, but physically he was incapable of giving expression to impetuous vehemence and searching pathos. In Coriolanus and Cato he was beyond praise, and possibly he may have been superior to both Garrick and Kean in Macbeth, although it must be remembered that in it part of his inspiration must have been caught from Mrs Siddons.

In all the other great Shakespearian characters he was, according to the best critics, inferior to them, least so in Lear, Hamlet and Wolsey, and most so in Shylock and Richard III. On account of the eccentricities of Sheridan, the proprietor of Drury Lane, Kemble withdrew from the management, and, although he resumed his duties at the beginning of the season 1800-1801, he at the close of 1802 finally resigned connection with it.

In 1803 he became manager of Covent Garden, in which he had acquired a sixth share for 23,000. The theatre was burned down on September 20, 1808, and the raising of the prices after the opening of the new theatre, in 1809, led to riots, which practically suspended the performances for three months. Kemble had been nearly ruined by the fire, and was only saved by a generous loan, afterwards converted into a gift, of £10,000 from the duke of Northumberland. Kemble took his final leave of the stage in the part of Coriolanus on June 23, 1817.

His retirement was probably hastened by the rising popularity of Edmund Kean. The remaining years of his life were spent chiefly abroad, and he died at Lausanne on the 26th of February 1823.2

Family

Priscill Hopkins b. 1755, d. May, 1845

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.
  2. [S4447] Internet Site: Wikopedia The Free Encyclopedia).

Priscill Hopkins1

F, #25414, b. 1755, d. May, 1845
     Priscill Hopkins was born in 1755.1
Priscill married John Philip Kemble, son of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, on December 8, 1787.1
Priscill died in May, 1845.1

Family

John Philip Kemble b. 1757, d. February 26, 1823

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.

George Stephen Kemble1

M, #25415, b. 1758, d. June 5, 1822
Father*Roger Kemble1 b. 1722, d. 1802
Mother*Sarah Ward1 b. 1735, d. 1807
George Stephen Kemble
      A Shakespearean actor, well known in later life for his girth and for his performance as Falstaff, especially at Covent Garden (1806) and the Drury Lane (1816). He also managed (1792–1800) the Edinburgh theater. George Stephen Kemble, son of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, was born in 1758.1
George married Elizabeth Satchell in 1783 at London, England.1
George died on June 5, 1822.1

Family

Elizabeth Satchell b. 1763, d. 1841

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.

Elizabeth Satchell1

F, #25416, b. 1763, d. 1841
Elizabeth Satchell Kemble
Elizabeth Satchell Kemble
     Elizabeth Satchell was born in 1763.1
Elizabeth married George Stephen Kemble, son of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, in 1783 at London, England.1
Elizabeth died in 1841.1

Family

George Stephen Kemble b. 1758, d. June 5, 1822

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.

Elizabeth Kemble1

F, #25417, b. 1761, d. 1836
Father*Roger Kemble1 b. 1722, d. 1802
Mother*Sarah Ward1 b. 1735, d. 1807
     Elizabeth Kemble, daughter of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, was born in 1761.1
Elizabeth married Charles Edward Witlock in 1785.1
Elizabeth died in 1836.1
She married the actor Charles Edward Whitlock and with him went (1792) to the United States, where she acted in several roles. Perhaps best known for her performance of Portia, she retired in 1807.

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.

Charles Edward Witlock1

M, #25418
     Charles married Elizabeth Kemble, daughter of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, in 1785.1

Family

Elizabeth Kemble b. 1761, d. 1836

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.

Anne Kemble1

F, #25419, b. May 16, 1764, d. 1838
Father*Roger Kemble1 b. 1722, d. 1802
Mother*Sarah Ward1 b. 1735, d. 1807
     Anne Kemble, daughter of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, was born on May 16, 1764.1
Anne died in 1838.1
Ann[e] Kemble Curtis Hatton "Anne of Swansea" (29 April 1764 - 26 December 1838) was born the seventh child of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward Kemble, a theatre couple whose children included the famous actress Sarah Siddons. She was such a precocious child that her family referred, perhaps ironically, to her as "The Genius," and when she was eleven, she wrote a play which her father produced at his theatre in Brecon Wales (Highfill, Burnim and Langhans 171-72). Later she serviced an apprenticeship with a mantua-maker, and in 1783 she married C. Curtis, a provincial actor who turned out to be a bigamist (Blaine, Clements, and Grundy 498-99).
The London papers provide a record of her activities over the next years. In October 1783 an advertisement appeared soliciting donations for her and stating that her famous family had refused to help. It said that she could not earn a living by doing needlework or making artificial flowers and because of her lameness, she was unable to earn a living on the stage like the rest of her family.
Next she gave lectures for a quack doctor named James Graham "on the present State and Influence of Women, on Society, in England, in France, in Spain and in the Eastern countries . . .[and on] the present indecent and unnatural phrenzy of the British Stage of turning Men into Women into Men." Later the London papers made note of her suicide attempt in Westminster Abbey and in 1789 of her accidental shooting in the eye by her male companion when she was working in a Bagnio in the Covent Garden Piazza (qtd. in Highfill, Burnim and Langhans 172).
In some reports she lost an eye, but in 1834, when she was seventy, a letter, not in Ann Hatton's handwriting but signed by "A Resident of Swansea," appeared stating "that she has not lost any eye. She still has the perfect use of a pair of dark, brilliant, and impressive ones . . ." (qtd. in Highfill, Burnim and Langhans 175). A portrait painted during these years can be found on "Swansea Heritage Net"; it seems to confirm that both of her eyes were intact.
During her lifetime she tried various literary genres. When she was fourteen she began writing poetry and her volume of "Poems on Miscellaneous Subjects," which was published in 1783, and one critic, with faint praise, wrote, "The public is frequently addressed in worse poetry" (Seilhamer 84-5). In her later life, as "Anne of Swansea," she published Poetic Trifles (1811), which includes "Swansea Bay," and autobiographical verses which poignantly express her "sense of desolation in old age . . . [and] her bitterness towards her family" (Dearnley).
Even though she was lame and had a squint (Highfill, Burnim and Langhans 171) and/or was scarred by smallpox (Dearnley), she did appear on stage at several times during her life. According to Seilhamer, in June 1793 she appeared at the Haymarket as Kitty in Seeing Is Believing and asNancy in Pad (85), and William Smith Clark suggests that ten years earlier she appeared at the Smock Alley Theatre in Dublin (qtd. in Highfill, Burnim and Langhans 172). During her years in Swansea, she was connected with the Swansea Theatre, and despite being "lame and grossly overweight," she appeared in some productions including Alexander's Feast, and in Douglas as Lady Randolph. The record indicates that after her success as Lady Randolph, she planned to play Calista in The Fair Penitent in the manner of her sister, Mrs. Siddons (qtd. in Dearnley).
She also wrote for the stage. In January 1792, she married William Hatton, who was reported by James Winston to be a musical-instrument maker (qtd. in Highfill, Burnim and Langhans 173), and in 1792 she accompanied him to the United States (Dearnley). She is reported to have supplied the plot and to have written one of the songs, but not the dialogue, for "a musical trifle, called Needs Must, or the Ballad Singers" (Seilhamer 84). Dunlap, after pointing out her relationship to the "highly talented family" of Kemble and labeling Hatton a "vulgar man," provides information about her second endeavor in the American theatre, her authorship of a play called Tammany, which he points out she assured some success for by presenting it to the Tammany Society. The theatre managers, according to Dunlap, "would not have dared to reject any thing from one of St. Tammany, and gladly received this production of the sister of Mrs. Siddons, seasoned high with spices hot from Paris . . . " (103-04). Dunlap's own view of the production was not favorable. He says that although The Daily Advertiser published a comment placing Tammany "among the highest efforts of genius, he thought it "literary a mélange of bombast (108). Tammany has been called the first American opera on an Indian subject and was modestly successful, playing in Philadelphia and Boston after its opening in New York (Highfill, Burnim and Langhans 173).
In America, she also gave a lecture on hearts, which she had written, and also gave readings from Dryden, Milton, Sterne, Smollet, Cooper, and Garrick.
By 1799 the Hattons had returned from the United States and settled in Swansea, where they operated a bathing house until his death in 1806. After operating a dancing school in Kidwelly, she returned to Swansea, where she lived out her life (Dearnley). It was there from 1810 until 1831 that she supported herself by writing the fourteen novels using the pen name of "Anne of Swansea," that comprise the whole of her work in that genre (Highfill, Burnim and Langhans 173).
These novels represent all popular types, including Gothic, social satire, and moral progress, and every female stereotype, including bossy wife, doting mother, and crabby old maids, plus some devastating portraits of Swansea and of herself. They were published by the Minerva Press in London (which became A. K. Newman and Company in 1820), and were among hundreds of works, mainly by women, which were placed on the shelves of the very popular circulating libraries of the time (Blaine, Clements, and Grundy 499; Dearnley; Freimarck).
Of her novels, which she also called romances or tales, Dearnley says she was, at her best, "capable of writing fluent narrative and lively dialogue, but her novels are immensely long and for the most part undeniably tedious." This tedious length, broken into a number of volumes, however, was important to the success of Hatton's novels in the circulating libraries because each volume counted as a separate book and generated revenue for five books, not just one.
During this period, until the end of her life, she received allowances from her father, brother, and sister, reportedly given on the condition that she stayed at least one hundred miles from London, where they lived (Dearnley). However, she was never comfortable financially, and she after her novel career was over, she continued to try to raise subscriptions for various writing projects, including a biography of her sister, Mrs. Siddons (Highfill, Burnim and Langhans 175).
She died a Catholic, even though she probably had been raised a Protestant, the faith of her mother, in the practice of the time, in Swansea in 1838 and was buried behind the St. John's Church there.
She left several personal effects to her step-daughter, Mary Hatton Lawrence, and the Rev. William Bond, Catholic priest of Swansea. Her remaining estate was left to her devoted servant, Mary Johns. Her papers are archived at the Folger Shakespeare Library (Blaine, Clements, and Grundy 175).
http://www.unl.edu/Corvey/html/Projects/CorveyNovels/HattonAnne/LoversBio.htm.

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.

Jane Kemble1

F, #25420, b. 1777
Father*Roger Kemble1 b. 1722, d. 1802
Mother*Sarah Ward1 b. 1735, d. 1807
     Jane Kemble, daughter of Roger Kemble and Sarah Ward, was born in 1777.1

Citations

  1. [S4490] Family Tree titled "Andy Coates Genealogy," Ancestry World Tree.

England London County 1891 Census

?, #25421
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

Ellen Wrenshall "Nellie" Grant.1
Henry Evans Gordon.2

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1891Gusvenor Hotel, St. George Hanover Square, London, EnglandEngland London County 1891 Census1
1891Royal Hospital Ward, St. Simon Parish, Chelsea, London, EnglandEngland London County 1891 Census2

Citations

  1. [S4445] 1891 England Census, Ellen Sartoris household.
  2. [S4446] 1891 England Census, Henry E. Gordon household.

IA Boone County 1925 State Census

?, #25422
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

Othello Hamilton Getty: Boone.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1925Boone, Boone County, IowaIA Boone County 1925 State Census1

Citations

  1. [S8007] 1925 Iowa State Census , I. R. Johnson household.

England Hampshire 1871 Census

?, #25423
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

Edward John Sartoris.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1871Brook and Newtown, Hampshire, Kent, EnglandEngland Hampshire 1871 Census1

Citations

  1. [S4441] 1871 England Census, Edward John Sartoris household.

England Northamptonshire 1851 Census

?, #25424
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

Edward John Sartoris.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1851Wellingborough, Earls Barton, Irchester, Northamptonshire, EnglandEngland Northamptonshire 1851 Census1

Citations

  1. [S4442] 1851 England Census, Edward Sartoris household.

England Hampshire 1881 Census

?, #25425
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

Edward John Sartoris.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1881Titchfield, Hampshire, EnglandEngland Hampshire 1881 Census1

Citations

  1. [S4443] 1881 England Census, Edward Jno Sartoris household.

England London County 1901 Census

?, #25426
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

Henry Evans Gordon.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1901Royal Hospital ward, Chelsea, EnglandEngland London County 1901 Census1

Citations

  1. [S4444] 1901 England Census, Henry E. Gordon household.

KS Wyandotte County 1910 Census

?, #25427
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

Thomas Kemble.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1910Ward 2, Kansas City, Wyandotte County, KansasKS Wyandotte County 1910 Census1

Citations

  1. [S4452] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Tom Kamble household.

KS Wyandotte County 1930 Census

?, #25428
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

Frank Getty.1
Walter F. Korsmeyer.2
Thomas Kemble.3

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1930Ward 8, Block 15, Kansas City, Wyandotte County, KansasKS Wyandotte County 1930 Census1
19304327 Eaton Avenue, Kansas City, Wyandotte County, KansasKS Wyandotte County 1930 Census2
1930Ward 3, Kansas City, Wyandotte County, KansasKS Wyandotte County 1930 Census3

Citations

  1. [S8021] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Frank Getty household.
  2. [S8120] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Walter Korsmeyer household.
  3. [S4451] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Tom Kemble household.

MO Montgomery County 1880 Census

?, #25429
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

George Solen Kemble.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1880Bear Creek Township, Montgomery County, MissouriMO Montgomery County 1880 Census1

Citations

  1. [S4450] 1880 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Solen Kemble household.

OR Clackamas County 1900 Census

?, #25430
     ••••••••• Households Listed •••••••••.

Benjamin Franklin Homesley.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1900Macksburgh Precinct, Clackamas County, OregonOR Clackamas County 1900 Census1

Citations

  1. [S4458] 1900 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Benjamin Homesly household.

Nancy Skinner1

F, #25431, b. 1850
     Nancy Skinner was born in 1850 in Missouri.1 Nancy lived with Ellen and Thomas Kemble, in 1860 at Prairie Township in Lincoln County, Missouri.1
Nancy was enumerated with Thomas Kemble on the 1860 U. S. Census for Prairie Township, Missouri. No relationship was stated. She was listed as a ten-year-old girl born in Missouri.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1860Prairie Township, Lincoln County, MissouriThomas Kemble1

Citations

  1. [S4454] 1860 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), Thomas Kimble household.

John Hummel1

M, #25432, b. 1882
Father*(?) Hummel
John Hummel
From Family Tree on Ancestry
     John Hummel, son of (?) Hummel, was born in 1882 in Hungary.1
John married Elizabeth Kersch, daughter of Leopoild Kersch and Elizabeth (?), circa 1903 at Hungary.1
John Hummel immigrated in 1905 from Hungary.2
Apparently John immigrated first around 1905 or 1906 then in 1907 Elizabeth followed with the children, her mother and her brother. It could be the rest of the family waited until Peter was old enough to travel, he was born in about December 1906.3
John was a grave digger in a cemetery in 1910.2
Elizabeth and John Hummel lived in 1910 at 3630 Rosewell Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Miklos, Peter and Helen, John's brother, Joseph Hummel, Elizabeth's mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Kersch..2
John is a head of household on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 12, St. Louis, Missouri. He was identified as a 29-year-old man born in Magyar as were his parents; he had been married for seven years in this marraige which was his first. He was not a citizen and could not read or write English. He was renting a home. Enumerated with him were: his wife Elizabeth, his sons Miklos and Peter, his daughter Helen, his mother-in-law Elizabeth (?), his brother Joseph.2
John was a truck farmer in 1920 at Union Road, St. Louis County, Missouri.1
Elizabeth and John Hummel lived in 1920 at Union Road in Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Miklos, Helen, Teresa and John, Elizabeth's mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Kersch..1
John is a head of household on the 1920 U. S. Census of Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was identified as a married 38-year-old man born in Hungary (Magyar) as were his parents; he was renting a farm which was listed on farm schedule 169 and could not read, write or speak English. Enumerated with him were: his wife Elizabeth, his sons Miklos and John, his daughters Helen and Teresa, his mother-in-law Mrs. Elizabeth Kersch.1
John was a school porter in 1930.4
Elizabeth and John Hummel lived in 1930 at 4325 Eichelburger Street in St. Louis, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children John, Miklos and Margaret..4
John is a head of household on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 13, St. Louis, Missouri. He was identified as a married 45-year-old man born in Hungary (Magyar) as were his parents; he was renting a home for $31.00 per month and could now read, write and speak English. Enumerated with him were: his wife Elizabeth, his sons John and Miklos, his daughter Margaret.4
There are some apparent problems with this family on the 1930 census.
John Jr. is shown as 22-years-old he actually should have been about 15-years-old, younger that Mick.
Mick is shown as 20-years-old, he should have been about 26. His birth place is shown as Missouri, actually born in Hungary.
John Sr. is shown as 45, should have been about 48.
Elizabeth is shown as 42, should have been about 45.
Daughter Margaret, age 17, doesn't exist on the 1920 census, could be either Theresa who would have been 19 or Helen who would have been 22. I have added as a seperate person but don't this she really is.
John and Elizabeths marriage date would be 1907 or 1908 was actually closer to 1903.4

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1910Ward 12, St. Louis, MissouriJohn Hummel2
1920Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, MissouriJohn Hummel1
1930Ward 13, St. Louis, MissouriJohn Hummel4

Family

Elizabeth Kersch b. 1884
Children

Citations

  1. [S4504] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  2. [S4506] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  3. [S2724] Inc. The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, "Ellis Island Passenger Records" database.
  4. [S4505] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  5. [S3758] U.S. Veterans Cemeteries, ca 1800-2004, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.

John Hummel1

M, #25433, b. 1915
Father*John Hummel1 b. 1882
Mother*Elizabeth Kersch2 b. 1884
     John Hummel, son of John Hummel and Elizabeth Kersch, was born in 1915 in Missouri.2
He lived with his parents, Elizabeth and John, in 1920 at Union Road in St. Louis County, Missouri.2
John was enumerated as the son of John Hummel on the 1920 U. S. Census of Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was listed as a five-year-old boy born in Missouri, his parents were born in Hungary.2
He lived with his parents, Elizabeth and John, in 1930 at 4325 Eichelburger Street in St. Louis, Missouri.3
John was an automobile mechanic in 1930.3
John was enumerated as the son of John Hummel on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 13, St. Louis, Missouri. He was listed as listed as a single 22-year-old male born in Missouri.3

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1920Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, MissouriJohn Hummel2
1930Ward 13, St. Louis, MissouriJohn Hummel3

Citations

  1. [S3758] U.S. Veterans Cemeteries, ca 1800-2004, Ancestry.com (database online), 2005.
  2. [S4504] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  3. [S4505] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.

Elizabeth Kersch1

F, #25434, b. 1884
Father*Leopoild Kersch1 d. before 1907
Mother*Elizabeth (?)1 b. August 5, 1853, d. December 22, 1949
     Elizabeth Kersch, daughter of Leopoild Kersch and Elizabeth (?), was born in 1884 in Hungary.1
Elizabeth married John Hummel, son of (?) Hummel, circa 1903 at Hungary.1
Elizabeth lived in 1907 in Zubadfalu, Hungary, residing with her were, her children Miklos and Peter, her mother Mrs. Elizabeth Kersch her brother, Peter Kersch.2
Elizabeth Kersch immigrated on October 23, 1907 to New York, New York, traveling on the ship Kaiser Wilhelm II from Bremen. Arriving with Elizabeth were Miklos "Mick" Hummel, Peter Hummel, Mrs. Elizabeth Kersch and Peter Kersch.2
Ship Kaiser Wilhelm II

Apparently John immigrated first around 1905 or 1906 then in 1907 Elizabeth followed with the children, her mother and her brother. It could be the rest of the family waited until Peter was old enough to travel, he was born in about December 1906.2
Elizabeth and John Hummel lived in 1910 at 3630 Rosewell Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Miklos, Peter and Helen, John's brother, Joseph Hummel, Elizabeth's mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Kersch..3
Elizabeth was enumerated as the wife of John Hummel under the name of "Elizabeth Hummel" on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 12, St. Louis, Missouri. She was listed as a 24-year-old woman born in Magyar (Hungary) as were her parents; she had been married for seven years and had three children, all still living.3
Elizabeth and John Hummel lived in 1920 at Union Road in St. Louis County, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children Miklos, Helen, Teresa and John, Elizabeth's mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Kersch..1
Elizabeth was enumerated as the wife of John Hummel under the name of "Elizabeth Hummel" on the 1920 U. S. Census of Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, Missouri. She was listed as a married 36-year-old woman born in Hungary as were her parents; she could not read, write or speak English.1
Elizabeth and John Hummel lived in 1930 at 4325 Eichelburger Street in St. Louis, Missouri. Residing with them were, their children John, Miklos and Margaret..4
Elizabeth was enumerated as the wife of John Hummel under the name of "Elizabeth Hummel" on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 13, St. Louis, Missouri. She was listed as a married 42-year-old woman born in Hungary as were her parents; she could read, write and speak English. She was 20-year-old at the time of her first marriage.4

Family

John Hummel b. 1882
Children

Citations

  1. [S4504] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  2. [S2724] Inc. The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, "Ellis Island Passenger Records" database.
  3. [S4506] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  4. [S4505] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.

Miklos "Mick" Hummel1,2

M, #25435, b. 1904
Father*John Hummel1 b. 1882
Mother*Elizabeth Kersch1 b. 1884
     Miklos "Mick" Hummel, son of John Hummel and Elizabeth Kersch, was born in 1904 in Hungary.1,2
Miklos lived with his parents, Elizabeth, in 1907 in Zubadfalu, Hungary.2
Miklos immigrated along with Elizabeth Kersch on October 23, 1907 at New York, New York, traveling on the ship Kaiser Wilhelm II.2
Ship Kaiser Wilhelm II
25438
     Apparently John immigrated first around 1905 or 1906 then in 1907 Elizabeth followed with the children, her mother and her brother. It could be the rest of the family waited until Peter was old enough to travel, he was born in about December 1906.2
He lived with his parents, Elizabeth and John, in 1910 at 3630 Rosewell Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri.3
Miklos was enumerated as the son of John Hummel under the name of "Mick Hummel" on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 12, St. Louis, Missouri. He was listed as a seven-year-old boy born in Magyar (Hungary) as were his parents.3
He lived with his parents, Elizabeth and John, in 1920 at Union Road in St. Louis County, Missouri.1
Miklos was a helper on the home farm in 1920 at Union Road, Missouri.1
Miklos was enumerated as the son of John Hummel under the name of "Mick Hummel" on the 1920 U. S. Census of Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, Missouri. He was listed as a 16-year-old boy born in Missouri, his parents were born in Hungary (he was actually born in Hungary.1
He lived with his parents, Elizabeth and John, in 1930 at 4325 Eichelburger Street in St. Louis, Missouri.4
Miklos was a tinner in 1930.4
Miklos was enumerated as the son of John Hummel on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 13, St. Louis, Missouri. He was listed as listed as a single 20-year-old male born in Missouri.4

Citations

  1. [S4504] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  2. [S2724] Inc. The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, "Ellis Island Passenger Records" database.
  3. [S4506] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  4. [S4505] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.

Helen Hummel1

F, #25436, b. 1908
Father*John Hummel1 b. 1882
Mother*Elizabeth Kersch1 b. 1884
     Helen Hummel, daughter of John Hummel and Elizabeth Kersch, was born in 1908 in Missouri.1
She lived with her parents, Elizabeth and John, in 1910 at 3630 Rosewell Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri.2
Helen was enumerated as the daughter of John Hummel on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 12, St. Louis, Missouri. She was listed as a two-year-old girl born in Magyar (Hungary) as were her parents.2
She lived with her parents, Elizabeth and John, in 1920 at Union Road, St. Louis County, Missouri.1
Helen was enumerated as the daughter of John Hummel on the 1920 U. S. Census of Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, Missouri. She was listed as listed as a 12-year-old girl born in Missouri, her parents were born in Hungary; she was attending school.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1910Ward 12, St. Louis, MissouriJohn Hummel2
1920Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, MissouriJohn Hummel1

Citations

  1. [S4504] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  2. [S4506] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.

Leopoild Kersch1,2

M, #25437, d. before 1907
     Leopoild married Elizabeth (?) at Hungary.1
Leopoild died before 1907 in Hungary.1

Family

Elizabeth (?) b. August 5, 1853, d. December 22, 1949
Children

Citations

  1. [S4504] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  2. [S6375] Comment posted to Berg family tree on Ancestry.
  3. [S2724] Inc. The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, "Ellis Island Passenger Records" database.

Elizabeth (?)1

F, #25438, b. August 5, 1853, d. December 22, 1949
     Elizabeth married Leopoild Kersch at Hungary.1 Elizabeth (?) was also known as Ersebet (?)2 Elizabeth (?) was born on August 5, 1853 in Romania.1,3
Elizabeth lived with her child, Elizabeth Kersch, in 1907 in Zubadfalu, Hungary.2
Elizabeth immigrated along with Elizabeth Kersch on October 23, 1907 at New York, New York, traveling on the ship Kaiser Wilhelm II.2
Ship Kaiser Wilhelm II

Apparently John immigrated first around 1905 or 1906 then in 1907 Elizabeth followed with the children, her mother and her brother. It could be the rest of the family waited until Peter was old enough to travel, he was born in about December 1906.2
She lived with her son-in-law, John Hummel and daughter, Elizabeth, in 1910 at 3630 Rosewell Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri.4
Elizabeth was enumerated as the mother-in-law of John Hummel under the name of "Elizabeth Kersch" on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 12, St. Louis, Missouri. She was listed as a 56-year-old widow born in Magyar (Hungary) as were her parents; she could not read or write English.4
She lived with her son-in-law, John Hummel and daughter, Elizabeth, in 1920 at Union Road in St. Louis County, Missouri.1
Elizabeth was enumerated as the mother-in-law of John Hummel under the name of "Elizabeth Kersch" on the 1920 U. S. Census of Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, Missouri. She was listed as listed as a 76-year-old widow born in Hungary (Magyar) as were her parents.1 Elizabeth (?) was buried in December, 1940 in Mt. Olive Catholic Cemetery in Lemay, St. Louis County, Missouri.3
Elizabeth died on December 22, 1949 in St. Louis, Missouri, at age 96.3

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1910Ward 12, St. Louis, MissouriJohn Hummel4
1920Carondelet Township, St. Louis County, MissouriJohn Hummel1

Family

Leopoild Kersch d. before 1907
Children

Citations

  1. [S4504] 1920 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  2. [S2724] Inc. The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, "Ellis Island Passenger Records" database.
  3. [S6375] Comment posted to Berg family tree on Ancestry.
  4. [S4506] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.

Margaret Hummel1

F, #25439, b. 1913
Father*John Hummel1 b. 1882
Mother*Elizabeth Kersch1 b. 1884
     Margaret Hummel, daughter of John Hummel and Elizabeth Kersch, was born in 1913 in Missouri.1
She lived with her parents, Elizabeth and John, in 1930 at 4325 Eichelburger Street, St. Louis, Missouri.1
Margaret was employed in a bag factory in 1930.1
Margaret was enumerated as the daughter of John Hummel on the 1930 U. S. Census of Ward 13, St. Louis, Missouri. She was listed as a 17-yer-old girl born in Missouri, her parents were born in Hungary.1

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1930Ward 13, St. Louis, MissouriJohn Hummel1

Citations

  1. [S4505] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.

Peter Hummel1

M, #25440, b. 1907, d. November 25, 1916
Father*John Hummel1 b. 1882
Mother*Elizabeth Kersch1 b. 1884
     Peter lived with his parents, Elizabeth, in 1907 in Zubadfalu, Hungary.2 Peter Hummel, son of John Hummel and Elizabeth Kersch, was born in 1907 in Hungary.1
Peter immigrated along with Elizabeth Kersch on October 23, 1907 at New York, New York, traveling on the ship Kaiser Wilhelm II.2
Ship Kaiser Wilhelm II

Apparently John immigrated first around 1905 or 1906 then in 1907 Elizabeth followed with the children, her mother and her brother. It could be the rest of the family waited until Peter was old enough to travel, he was born in about December 1906.2
He lived with his parents, Elizabeth and John, in 1910 at 3630 Rosewell Avenue in St. Louis, Missouri.3
Peter was enumerated as the son of John Hummel on the 1910 U. S. Census of Ward 12, St. Louis, Missouri. He was listed as a three-year-old boy born in Magyar (Hungary) as were his parents.3
Peter died on November 25, 1916 in St. Louis, Missouri.4 He was buried in November, 1916 in Gatewood Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.4

Census

Census YearPlaceHead of Household
1910Ward 12, St. Louis, MissouriJohn Hummel3

Citations

  1. [S4505] 1930 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  2. [S2724] Inc. The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, "Ellis Island Passenger Records" database.
  3. [S4506] 1910 U.S. Federal Census (Population Schedule), John Hummel household.
  4. [S6375] Comment posted to Berg family tree on Ancestry.